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News stories tagged with "apples"

Hispanic men and women - some of them quite young - provide labor illegally on many dairy farms. Photo: David Sommerstein
Hispanic men and women - some of them quite young - provide labor illegally on many dairy farms. Photo: David Sommerstein

Schumer says immigration bill will help NY dairy farms

U.S. Senator Charles Schumer says a new bipartisan immigration deal will provide an economic boost to New York farms and the agriculture industry.

In a press release, Schumer says the bill will be especially helpful to dairy farms and fruit growers.  Go to full article
Mature apple tree before and after pruning. Photo: W. Lord, UNH Co-operative Extension
Mature apple tree before and after pruning. Photo: W. Lord, UNH Co-operative Extension

The science and art of pruning apple trees

Pruning apple trees can bring trepidation to gardeners, but pruning improves the tree's vigor and fruit production. If you have an apple tree in your backyard, now is the time to start thinking about pulling out the pruners. Todd Moe talks with horticulturist Amy Ivy, who says now is a great time to start planning for pruning in March and April. She has some tips for best way to prune apple trees - and why you should take the time to prune.  Go to full article
Apple orchard at harvest time. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/people/88499915@N00/">Winnie Au</a>, cc <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Apple orchard at harvest time. Photo: Winnie Au, cc some rights reserved

Defying weather, North Country apples thrive

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is predicting low yield for New York's apple crop, about half of last year. Growers blame the spring weather: It was unseasonably warm in March, and trees started to bud. In some areas, they bloomed. Then in April, temperatures dipped below freezing, killing the blossoms. It's the same story in many apple growing states, including Washington and Michigan.

NCPR has been checking in with Patricia Sheehan of Rulf's Orchard in Peru throughout the season. And when Julie Grant spoke with her this week, Sheehan had good news: Her trees, and many in the North Country, didn't bloom in March, and so weren't killed off in the April frost. Still, she says the dry summer has had an effect on the apples.  Go to full article
Dean Beckstead
Dean Beckstead

Ontario apple orchard surveys this year's crop damage

Unusual weather this spring took a heavy toll on fruit growers across the region. Industry observers estimated crop damage to Ontario's apple crop at well over 80%. Smyth's Apple Orchard in South Dundas, Ontario was planted in the mid-1800's, very near where the first McIntosh Red apple was discovered in 1811. About 90 acres of apples are still grown at the 5th generation family operation. Smyth Orchard's Dean Beckstead told Lucy Martin it's going to be a very difficult year.  Go to full article

The challenge of growing fruit

The North Country climate isn't great for fruit trees. There are lots of apple orchards on Lake Champlain, particularly, but insuring a good apple harvest can be a challenge for the home gardener.

Cornell Cooperative extension horticulturist Amy Ivy has tips on other crops for home-grown fruit: berries.  Go to full article

Sour weather worries apple growers

While some North Country apple growers are worried sick about the weather - others say it's too soon to be concerned. After a week of temperatures in the 80s, apple trees started to bud. Julie Grant spoke yesterday with Patricia Sheehan, co-owner of Rulfs Orchard in Peru. Forecasters were predicting lows of around 15 degrees.

The forecast calls for better apple weather later this week, with highs near 50, and lows in the lower 30s.  Go to full article

Apple harvest looks good, despite weather

The word apple might make you think of your iPhone or Steve Jobs. But apples are also an important crop in northern New York. Growers say despite the extreme weather, they've harvested a successful crop of big, sweet apples this year.

Mason Forrence is president of Forrence Orchards in Peru. He's the third generation in his family to run the business. Forrence spoke with Julie Grant on his cellphone, from the field. He says they're finishing up the harvest in what has been a challenging year.  Go to full article
Ted Elk scrapes honey off of a comb.  Yum!  Photos: Julie Grant
Ted Elk scrapes honey off of a comb. Yum! Photos: Julie Grant

Tough times for bees

We get one of every three bites of food from crops pollinated by bees. That's about $15 billion into the U.S. economy each year. But North Country beekeepers are losing huge numbers of their little, busy coworkers.

Apiarists (beekeepers) from around the country--and the world--have been dealing with what's called Colony Collapse Disorder. It's been around for five years now.

Julie Grant visited with some beekeepers, and reports that scientists and the government don't agree on what should be done to help them.  Go to full article
The Forrence Family at their apple orchards in Peru (photo: TAUNY)
The Forrence Family at their apple orchards in Peru (photo: TAUNY)

A devotion to apples for generations

The Forrence Family Orchards, in Peru, NY, will be given an award by Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, this month. TAUNY will hand out its annual North Country Heritage Awards on Sunday, October 18th, in Canton. The Forrence family can trace its farming roots back to the early 1800s in the Champlain Valley. In the 1940s, the farm switched from producing milk to apples as its main crop. Today, it is owned and run by third and fourth generation Forrences, who use state-of-the-art technology to grow and harvest apples. But they still maintain many of the farm's original 18th century buildings. Todd Moe spoke with Mason Forrence about this year's apple harvest and a lifetime in the orchard.  Go to full article

Thinking ahead to apples and blueberries

Martha Foley and horticulturist Amy Ivy brush off thoughts of snow and cold and look ahead to more summer garden delights: apples and blueberries.  Go to full article

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