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News stories tagged with "art"

<em>Peace Oath</em>, ca. 1967, wood engraving, private collection
Peace Oath, ca. 1967, wood engraving, private collection

Rockwell Kent's enduring art, legacy

An exhibition of one of America's most famous 20th century artists, and an Adirondack farmer, is on display through mid-December at St. Lawrence University. Rockwell Kent: The Once Most Popular American Artist is a display of more than 75 works in a variety of media, including some recent acquisitions by the university, in the Brush Art Gallery and at the Owen D. Young Library Special Collections.  Go to full article
This artsy neon sign hangs in the window of the St. Lawrence County Arts Council in Potsdam.  Photo: Todd Moe
This artsy neon sign hangs in the window of the St. Lawrence County Arts Council in Potsdam. Photo: Todd Moe

Studio Tour: artistry and creativity up close

Todd Moe talks with Hillary Oak, director of the St. Lawrence County Arts Council, about this weekend's 25th annual Artists' Studio Tour. It's opportunity to meet artists and see the creative process first hand.  Go to full article
One of the many gingerbread creations at TAUNY over the past decade.  Photo:  TAUNY
One of the many gingerbread creations at TAUNY over the past decade. Photo: TAUNY

Time to think gingerbread

Traditional Arts in Upstate New York kicks off its tenth annual Sugar & Spice gingerbread contest and exhibit later this month. And to help would-be bakers and builders get into the mood, TAUNY is hosting a couple of workshops.

Todd Moe spoke with TAUNY folklorist Hannah Harvester about this year's contest, and the history of gingerbread houses. The tradition began in the mid-19th century when the story of Hansel and Gretel and a witch's candy cottage become popular. But Harvester says, in some cultures, baking gingerbread goes back centuries.  Go to full article
Hilary Oak and her dog, Venus.  Photo: St. Lawrence County Arts Council
Hilary Oak and her dog, Venus. Photo: St. Lawrence County Arts Council

Arts Council seeks new director

After more than ten years at its helm, the executive director of the St. Lawrence County Arts Council says she's stepping down, as soon as a replacement is found. Hilary Oak made the announcement earlier this season, and will stay on until her replacement is properly trained.

Oak joined the Arts Council in 2001 as board president and was named executive director in 2005. She, board members and volunteers have revived the group over the last decade. Under her leadership, the Arts Council has grown to include a gallery and gift shop in Potsdam and dozens of art education classes on the second floor of downtown Snell Hall.

Hilary Oak says it's time for someone with new energy, skills and creative ideas to lead the organization. She spoke with Todd Moe about the joys and challenges of helping to rebuild and strengthen the arts community in the North Country.  Go to full article
A sample of "The Door Project" at the Hyde Collection in Glens Falls. Photo: Hyde Collection
A sample of "The Door Project" at the Hyde Collection in Glens Falls. Photo: Hyde Collection

Opening doors for creative teens

A new exhibit at the Hyde Collection in Glens Falls features old doors transformed into new works of art by area teens. Todd Moe talks with the Hyde's curator of education, June Leary, about The Door Project.  Go to full article
Laura Foster and Ed Lavarnway along with an original "Bronco Buster" bronze and a computer-assisted copy at the Remington.
Laura Foster and Ed Lavarnway along with an original "Bronco Buster" bronze and a computer-assisted copy at the Remington.

Using high tech to create nearly perfect copies of a Remington icon

Artist Frederic Remington's bronze sculptures of cowboys, native Americans, and cavalry are considered prized collector's items. The Remington Museum in Ogdensburg is using the latest digital technology to reproduce one of Remington's first and most popular sculptures, The Bronco Buster. Original sculptures, cast in multiples, were made and sold during Remington's lifetime. The museum is using an original casting in its collection as a model for a series of 3-D laser-scanned copies.

Todd Moe visited the Remington Museum for a chat with curator Laura Foster and executive director Ed Lavarnway about using computers and high tech cameras to create hyper-accurate reproductions of Remington's art.  Go to full article
A postcard of Remington's The Howl of the Weather against the Cranberry Lake shoreline.  Photo: Remington Art Museum, Ogdensburg
A postcard of Remington's The Howl of the Weather against the Cranberry Lake shoreline. Photo: Remington Art Museum, Ogdensburg

In search of Remington's Cranberry Lake haunts

The focus this weekend during Canton's annual Remington Arts Festival, will be on famous native son and 19th century artist Frederic Remington. While he immortalized the western frontier in oil and bronze, Remington also enjoyed visits to the Adirondacks.

Every summer, from 1889 to 1900, he and his wife Eva visited friends on Cranberry Lake. He completed sketches for the first illustrated edition of Longfellow's Song of Hiawatha during visits to the lake, where he also enjoyed hunting, fishing and relaxing. Modern artists and art lovers enjoy re-tracing Remington's footsteps in "the Great South Woods", as it was called.

Since 2000, Allen and Marilyn Splete have been seasonal residents of Cranberry Lake. They love the lake, local history and Remington's art. Earlier this month they invited Todd Moe along for a boat ride to explore a little-known facet of Remington's life.  Go to full article
Jackie Altman paints "en plein air" near Lake Placid.
Jackie Altman paints "en plein air" near Lake Placid.

Art that conveys a sense of immediacy

Many Adirondack artists will tell you that our region offers nearly all the elements a landscape painter looks for - mountains, trees, waterways and ever-changing hues of green, gray and blue. You'll find dozens of artists outdoors this week in the Adirondacks painting "plein air" during Saranac Lake's Fourth Annual Plein Air Festival, part of the "Great Adirondack Days" celebration.

It's a time-honored tradition, particularly by artists who want to convey a sense of immediacy. They'll find a spot with a great view of a mountain or along a stream, prop up an easel and paint just as they see it. Most works are completed within hours on the spot. Spontaneity is key. Bugs, rain and fleeting sunlight are challenges.

Last summer, Todd Moe tagged along when Lake Placid artist Jackie Altman returned to a favorite spot with views of some of the High Peaks.  Go to full article
Jean Barberis and Ben Cohen test their paper skiff around the docks at the Antique Boat Museum in Clayton.
Jean Barberis and Ben Cohen test their paper skiff around the docks at the Antique Boat Museum in Clayton.

Down the St. Lawrence in a paper boat

Rowboats are a common sight on the St. Lawrence River, but a paper skiff is making its way through the Thousand Islands and down river to Montreal this week. The 17-foot boat was made by a group of New York City artists at the Antique Boat Museum in Clayton.

The urban artist/boat builders spent the last two weeks using the museum's collection and resources to build a new boat and learn more about the boating culture on the St. Lawrence. Their residency is a partnership with the museum's current exhibition of maritime-inspired art, called "Floating Through: Boats and Boating in Contemporary Art."

The artists are members of a Brooklyn collective called "Mare Liberum" and approach boat building in a non-traditional way: cheaply and quickly. With a little help from experts at the museum, they completed the boat in two weeks. But, a skiff made of paper? Could it really be rowed 168 miles past islands, through shipping channels and the St. Lawrence Seaway? Todd Moe stopped by the Antique Boat Museum late last week during the final stages of construction.  Go to full article

Movie makers, film buffs gather in Lake Placid

The 12th annual Lake Placid Film Festival opens Wednesday, with new stars, new movies and a panel discussion on the future of small town theaters. This year's festival will feature screenings of films from local, national and International filmmakers, special guests and events such as the North Country Shorts and the return of the 24 hour student film-making competition, "Sleepless in Lake Placid."

Todd Moe spoke with Tim Brearton, the festival's project specialist. He's helped out since the inaugural forum in 2000. He calls it an event that brings people together, supports local artists and allows film students from area colleges to learn about the rigors of the film industry.  Go to full article

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