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News stories tagged with "art"

Ursula Trudeau and Max pose wearing favorite hats surrounded by dozens of others at the Saranac Laboratory in Saranac Lake.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Ursula Trudeau and Max pose wearing favorite hats surrounded by dozens of others at the Saranac Laboratory in Saranac Lake. Photo: Todd Moe

Saranac Lake's queen of hats

Some of Ursula Trudeau's favorite hats are on display at the historic Saranac Laboratory in Saranac Lake. Ursula Trudeau is known in the community for her collection of colorful hats, many of which are works of art in their own right. She's the widow of Dr. Frank Trudeau, whose grandfather founded the laboratory for the study of tuberculosis in 1894.

The exhibit, organized by the Historic Saranac Lake staff, includes hats from China, Morocco, Russia, and designers from Montreal and New York City. You'll find straw hats, top hats, cowboy hats, garden party hats and even a native American headdress. Todd Moe stopped by as the hats, and hat boxes, were being arranged for the summer show.

You're invited to tonight's opening reception for the "A Life in Hats" exhibit from 5:00-7:00 in the John Black Room of the Saranac Laboratory.  Go to full article
Georgia O'Keeffe, <i>Petunias</i>, 1925, oil on board
Georgia O'Keeffe, Petunias, 1925, oil on board

Summer at the Hyde Collection: O'Keeffe and Stieglitz at Lake George

The work by two giants of American modernism are on display at the Hyde Collection art museum in Glens Falls this summer. Modern Nature and Family Album include dozens of paintings and photographs by Georgia O'Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz from their summers together on Lake George. From 1918 to 1934, O'Keefe lived for part of each year at Stieglitz's family estate in the southern Adirondacks.

Todd Moe talks with the Hyde Collection's Erin Coe, who curated the show. The exhibit is divided into six themes that include abstractions, landscapes, barns, and botanicals. All related to her visits to Lake George.  Go to full article
Sara Lynch carves details into a ceramic cat bowl that will later be glazed and fired in her kiln.  Photo: Todd Moe
Sara Lynch carves details into a ceramic cat bowl that will later be glazed and fired in her kiln. Photo: Todd Moe

How a young artist is creating her niche in the art world

Over the next few months, we'll bring you some of the voices of the many folks in the North Country who make a living in their own workshops, basements and spare rooms. It might sound charming - setting your own work hours - but the artisans we've talked to say full-time art is not an easy decision and a lot of hard work. Finding space, commissions, marketing, moral support, and reserving uninterrupted creative time are some of the challenges.

Today, a trip to the Potsdam studio of painter, photographer and ceramicist Sara Lynch. Her paintings are a blend of acrylics and found objects. She's experimenting with turning wasp nests into jewelry. Sara's ceramics are functional sculptures that combine everyday objects -- mugs and bowls -- with her favorite flora and fauna. Todd Moe has more.  Go to full article
Laura Von Rosk's <i>Mt. Coleman</i>.  The gallery talk on Saturday at Tannery Pond Community Center (4 pm) will include video work from filmmaker Hilary Hudson and musician Henry Kaiser.  Photo: Laura Von Rosk
Laura Von Rosk's Mt. Coleman. The gallery talk on Saturday at Tannery Pond Community Center (4 pm) will include video work from filmmaker Hilary Hudson and musician Henry Kaiser. Photo: Laura Von Rosk

Exploring art and science at the bottom of the world

An artist and a scientist will unveil a new exhibit Saturday afternoon at the Tannery Pond Community Center in North Creek. AntARTica includes works by artist Laura Von Rosk and cell biologist Sam Bowser. The exhibit will include Von Rosk's landscape paintings and Bowser's watercolor paintings of tiny, single-celled organisms called Foraminifera that live under the ice. The two were part of a team of biologists and artists that traveled to antarctica in 2011.

Todd Moe spoke with Bowser and Von Rosk about how artists and scientists can inspire each other and collaborate on projects.  Go to full article
Meaghan, Michael and Maureen Pierce with their Dale Chihuly-inspired macchia on display at the Winter Gallery at the Remington Art Museum in Ogdensburg.  Photo: Todd Moe
Meaghan, Michael and Maureen Pierce with their Dale Chihuly-inspired macchia on display at the Winter Gallery at the Remington Art Museum in Ogdensburg. Photo: Todd Moe

Remington hosts 30th annual Elementary Art Exihibit

Sculpture, fiber and found objects are all part of the 30th annual Elementary Art Exhibit on display this spring at the Frederic Remington Art Museum in Ogdensburg. The show continues through May 11th in the Richard E. Winter Gallery.

The annual show allows the museum to showcase the creative process happening in school arts programs. Todd Moe toured the exhibit and spoke with Ogdensburg Free Academy art teacher Dianne Drayse-Alonso, and with Maureen, Meaghan and Michael Pierce about their Remington Home School Art Class project, based on the work of professional artist, Dale Chihuly.  Go to full article
Lis Barsuglia-Madsen and her husband Michael, love spending the winter months in their rustic home, filled with looms, near Harrisville.  Originally from Denmark, Lis uses bright colors to help offset overcast skies and the snowy landscape. Photo: Todd Moe
Lis Barsuglia-Madsen and her husband Michael, love spending the winter months in their rustic home, filled with looms, near Harrisville. Originally from Denmark, Lis uses bright colors to help offset overcast skies and the snowy landscape. Photo: Todd Moe

Living with looms and working with wool

March is the start of another busy season of exhibits, fairs and road trips for artisans across the region. Over the next few months, we'll bring you some of the voices of the many folks in the North Country who make a living in their own workshops, basements and spare rooms. It might sound charming - setting your own work hours - but the artisans we've talked to say full-time art is not an easy decision and a lot of hard work. Finding space, commissions, marketing, moral support, and reserving uninterrupted creative time are some of the challenges.

Today, a trip to the woods near Harrisville, in the northwestern Adirondacks, to visit a couple who gave up jobs in marketing and at the post office to devote their attention to all things fiber, from woven rugs to knitted sweaters. Lis Barsuglia-Madsen and her husband Michael moved from New Jersey to the North Country twenty years ago. The new environment offered a chance to focus on following a dream -- spending time together as artisans inspired by the mountains, deep woods and solitude.  Go to full article
<i>Maple tapping in the early spring</i>, butternut, Tom Cote. Photo:  Todd Moe
Maple tapping in the early spring, butternut, Tom Cote. Photo: Todd Moe

Artists who look to the forest for ideas, inspiration

Considered America's oldest working woodlands, the Northern Forest -- stretching from the Tug Hill through the Adirondacks to the coast of Maine -- is also home to a remarkable range of traditional artists. This month, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, opened a new exhibit that features art from among the trees.

TAUNY executive director Jill Breit says the concept behind Artists of the Forest is to showcase how artists are using the resources that are growing around them in the woods. The pieces featured in the show come from northern New York, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine.  Go to full article
<i>Goddess of Earth and Nature</i>, by Jordan Snyder, 7th grade, is one of the pieces in the annual middle and high school art exhibit at the Remington through Sunday.  Photo: Todd Moe
Goddess of Earth and Nature, by Jordan Snyder, 7th grade, is one of the pieces in the annual middle and high school art exhibit at the Remington through Sunday. Photo: Todd Moe

Young artists get creative in Remington exhibit

Artwork from middle and high school students around St. Lawrence County is on display this week at the Frederic Remington Art Museum in Ogdensburg. The 16th annual middle and high school art exhibit continues through Sunday in the Richard E. Winter Gallery.

Todd Moe stopped by for a tour with curator Laura Foster, who says the annual show allows the museum to showcase the creative process happening in arts programs at local public schools. There's also art on display created by home schooled students who use the Remington for art classes.  Go to full article
<i>Goodwill from Sharon</i> by Sharon Cheng is part of the "New Work for a New Year" exhibit in Potsdam.
Goodwill from Sharon by Sharon Cheng is part of the "New Work for a New Year" exhibit in Potsdam.

New art for the new year

Artwork by more than 30 North Country artists is featured in a new exhibit at the St. Lawrence County Arts Council in Potsdam. New Work for a New Year features art produced over the last 12 months.

Todd Moe spoke with Arts Council executive director Rebekah Wilkins-Pepiton about the show, which will be on display in the gallery through mid-March.  Go to full article
Sam Gilliam, <i>Asking</i>, 1972, acrylic on canvas.  Photo: Hyde Collection
Sam Gilliam, Asking, 1972, acrylic on canvas. Photo: Hyde Collection

Fifty years of collecting art at the Hyde

The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls is celebrating its 50th anniversary as a public museum this year. Todd Moe talks with Hyde chief curator and interim co-director Erin Coe about the museum's legacy and some of the pieces in its golden anniversary exhibition.

About three hundred people attended an opening reception for the exhibit, 50 at 50: Five Decades of Collecting at The Hyde, last Saturday night. Coe says she had a lot of fun exploring the archives of the permanent collection and hanging the commemorative show.  Go to full article

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