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News stories tagged with "artist"

Allen Blagden traveled to the Wild Center to paint the resident porcupine Stickley especially for the "Moments" exhibit.  Photo: Wild Center
Allen Blagden traveled to the Wild Center to paint the resident porcupine Stickley especially for the "Moments" exhibit. Photo: Wild Center

Watercolorist Allen Blagden inspires "Moments" exhibit in Tupper Lake

The art of one of the nation's best watercolorists is on display at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake. It's part of the inspiration for the "Moments, Reimagining Nature through Art" exhibit. The interactive display, that's part multi-media, part art show, part hands-on art project, encourages visitors to engage with nature through art.  Go to full article
Akwesasne Mohawk collage artist, musician and poet Alex Jacobs at a display of his work in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  Photo: Todd Moe
Akwesasne Mohawk collage artist, musician and poet Alex Jacobs at a display of his work in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Photo: Todd Moe

A Santa Fe artist with roots in Akwesasne

Alex Jacobs is a Native American visual and performing artist who has called Santa Fe home for almost 30 years. But he hasn't forgotten his roots in Akwesasne, the St. Regis Mohawk Reservation in northern Franklin County. Jacobs first travelled to the southwest as a student at the Institute of American Indian Arts, where he graduated in 1977. In the 1980's, he supported his family as an ironworker and has also been an activist, broadcaster, musician, poet and art teacher.

Todd Moe met Jacobs while touring the farmers' market at the historic Santa Fe Railyard this summer. His fabric collage works of art resemble brightly colored paintings. It's his own technique - "painting" with fabrics - that combines elements from New Mexico with the quilt-making traditions of his Mohawk mother and grandmother. He still visits family in the North Country, but also enjoys the challenge of creating art in the southwest and navigating Santa Fe's busy arts community.  Go to full article

Climbing, collecting and shaping rocks

About 20 years ago, Matt Horner started climbing rocks and ice in the High Peaks. Today, the Keene Valley resident continues to work and play around granite boulders, but he's found a way to make art. More than 60 of his works -- carved sculptures and stone vessels -- are on display at View in Old Forge this season.

Matt is also a professional fly-fishing guide and well-acquainted with the smooth river stones in the region. He told Todd Moe that shaping stones started a few years ago while working on a rock wall.  Go to full article
Jay Howard Doig's 1890 self portrait on the Moose River.
Jay Howard Doig's 1890 self portrait on the Moose River.

Adirondack Attic: a charming 19th century watercolor

We continue our series, the Adirondack Attic, with Andy Flynn. You may know Andy from his series of "Adirondack Attic" books on local history. He uses the objects people make, use and leave behind to tell stories about the life and times of the region. NCPR is collaborating with Andy and his sources at the Adirondack Museum and other historical associations and museums in the region to bring these stories to air. Today, a watercolor painting by a Lowville painter from the late 19th century that celebrates fly-fishing.  Go to full article
Puppets will help tell the story of Remington's life and art.
Puppets will help tell the story of Remington's life and art.

Remington Museum celebrates namesake's 150th birthday

Horse-drawn wagon rides, pumpkin carving and cake will be part of a birthday party in Ogdensburg on Saturday for Frederic Remington. Todd Moe stopped by Kid's Place to talk with Education Specialist Lauren Gilmour for a preview of a 150th birthday party for Frederic Remington.  Go to full article
The 90-ton doors stand open above the silo.  Its future use - a dance space.
The 90-ton doors stand open above the silo. Its future use - a dance space.

A Cold War relic with a new mission

Australian architectural designer Alexander Michael opens an exhibit of his sculptures this Saturday at his part time Adirondack hidden home that once housed an anti-ballistic missile (ABM). Michael will also give tours of his former Atlas Missile Silo in Lewis, in the Champlain Valley.

Twelve ABM sites were built near the Plattsburgh Air Force base in the early 1960's, hidden in the mountains. Each deep underground silo held a missile, and quarters where the crews lived and worked. Many of these silos were taken off alert and fully decommissioned within a few years.

Following their closure, most of them were sold off to local towns, salvage companies or left to decay. But Michael's Lewis Missile Base, also known as Boquet 556-5, is one of the more impressively restored missile silos.

He lives there for about eight weeks each year, and for more than ten years, he's pumped out water, hauled out or recycled scrap metal, restored the former Launch Control Center into an underground retreat. Todd Moe stopped by for a tour.  Go to full article
One of Alex's lifesize sculptures.
One of Alex's lifesize sculptures.

Once a nuclear missle silo, now a site for art

Dozens of artists in the Tri-Lakes area will open their doors to visitors this weekend. It's the annual Artists at Work Studio Tour and a chance to ask questions and view art being created up close in studios in Lake Placid, Saranac Lake and Tupper Lake.

Alexander Michael, an architectural designer from Australia, is an artist-in-residence for the event. He'll be working on a series of fiberglass sculptures at 7444 Gallery in Saranac Lake this weekend, and then offering tours of his decommissioned North Country missile silo and part time home near Plattsburgh, next weekend.

Todd Moe caught up with him to talk about living in missile silo and designing art that explores religion, culture and creative expression.  Go to full article
Jackie Altman paints "en plein air" near Lake Placid.
Jackie Altman paints "en plein air" near Lake Placid.

Art in the making -- outdoors

Many Adirondack artists will tell you that our region offers nearly all the elements a landscape painter looks for - mountains, trees, waterways and ever-changing hues of green, gray and blue. You'll find dozens of artists outdoors this week in the Adirondacks painting "plein air" during Saranac Lake's Third Annual Plein Air Festival, part of the "Great Adirondack Days" celebration.

It's a time-honored tradition, particularly by artists who want to convey a sense of immediacy. They'll find a spot with a great view of a mountain or along a stream, prop up an easel and paint just as they see it. Most works are completed within hours on the spot. Spontaneity is key. Bugs, rain and fleeting sunlight are challenges.

Todd Moe tagged along when Lake Placid artist Jackie Altman returned to a favorite spot with views of some of the High Peaks.  Go to full article

Painting large in watercolor

Some very large watercolors by Saranac Lake artist Tim Fortune will be on display at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts, starting Friday, August 12th. Watercolor Encounters is a one man show that will include 15 large format watercolors that Tim has worked on over the last four years. He spoke with Todd Moe about the sheer size of the paintings and their impact on viewers.  Go to full article
"Crooked Tamarack and Cotton Grass Three" by Georgeanne Gaffney. Used with permission.
"Crooked Tamarack and Cotton Grass Three" by Georgeanne Gaffney. Used with permission.

Creating and sharing art in a favorite place

A new exhibit at the Paul Smiths Visitor Interpretive Center features artwork based on hikes at the VIC throughout the seasons. Todd Moe talks with artist Georgeanne Gaffney about her show, "Meander". She says most of the eleven new pieces are based on trips through the woods at the VIC.  Go to full article

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