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News stories tagged with "audobon"

Birding the Seaway Trail

Birders looking for the best birding spots along the big waters of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River have a new resource. The Seaway Trail Foundation has published a new birding theme guidebook to help birders find their favorite raptors, songbirds and waterfowl. Todd Moe talks with ornithologist Gerry Smith, author of Birding the Great Lakes Seaway Trail, about some of his favorite birding hot spots.  Go to full article
A Northern Hawk Owl spotted in Potsdam
A Northern Hawk Owl spotted in Potsdam

A winter of counting birds

Birders around the region are still talking about this season's Christmas Bird Count - it's an annual event around the country when on one specific day, volunteers fan out over a 15-mile-diameter designated area to record all the birds they see. These hardy volunteers, usually avid birders, go out no matter what the weather may be. Todd Moe has more.  Go to full article
Perhaps the most unusual bird on the count was a leucistic black-capped Chickadee at a Bloomingdale feeder (photo: Larry Master)
Perhaps the most unusual bird on the count was a leucistic black-capped Chickadee at a Bloomingdale feeder (photo: Larry Master)

Volunteers flock to annual bird count

For the 108th year, volunteer birders fanned out across the country for the annual birding census earlier this winter. The all-volunteer effort takes a snapshot of bird populations to monitor their status and distribution across the Western Hemisphere. The Audubon Society started the Christmas Bird Count in 1900 as an alternative to a Victorian-era holiday hunting tradition of shooting the greatest number of birds. Today, data collected during the Christmas Bird Count helps researchers monitor bird behavior and bird conservation. You could call it bird watching with a benefit. Todd Moe tagged along with some Adirondack bird enthusiasts who began their avian adventure at first light.  Go to full article

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