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News stories tagged with "biodiesel"

Gasification: alternative energy miracle?

The Potsdam-based Zeropoint Clean Technology is building a privately funded plant in Massena. It's scheduled to be built by early 2007. It's a small test facility, but the process could pioneer a radically different approach to making ethanol and other biofuels. The process was invented by Clarkson chemist Phillip Leveson. Gregory Warner recently visited Dr. Leveson's lab to talk about gasification, and glimpse a possible future.  Go to full article

Biofuel Economy, Part I: Biodiesel

Biofuel. You hear a lot about it these days. And how the growing industry means new opportunities for farmers and foresters and other businesses in the North Country. Over the next few days we're going to take a closer look at what the biofuel economy might mean for the North Country. We'll look at big plans and small solutions.

First, what is biofuel? Biofuel means using biological material for energy. Like burning wood in a woodstove for heat. There are two kinds of biofuel used for transportation: ethanol and biodiesel. Ethanol is a gasoline additive made from vegetable crops - mostly corn. We'll talk more about ethanol tomorrow.

Today we'll look at biodiesel. Biodiesel is basically vegetable oil with the glycerin removed. It can run in diesel engines. It's mostly made from soybean oil. As fuel prices rise, It's becoming more cost-competitive. But as Gregory Warner reports, many consumers and farmers are still wary.  Go to full article

After Oil, What?

The world will eventually run out of oil. The question is how much we have left. And a growing number of geologists and scientists, even oil industry executives, are warning - not much. But that's not even the real problem. The real problem comes sooner: as we start to run out, after we pass what's known as the peak of oil production, oil will get increasingly expensive. And that affects everything from gas prices to heating oil to transporting food from farm to supermarkets.
     Richard Heinberg is the author of two books on the issue: The Party's Over - Oil, War, and the Fate of Industrial Societies and Powerdown - Options and Actions for a Post-Carbon World. He told Gregory Warner, we're talking about a drastic change to civilization as we know it.
     Richard Heinberg will be speaking Friday evening at 7 pm at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Canton. He's also giving public lectures every Tuesday and Thursday this month at SUNY Potsdam in room 319 of Satterly Hall.  Go to full article

Energy Fair Looks at the Big Picture

If you're concerned about high gas prices you may be interested in interested in alternative fuels.Or maybe you'd like your home to be more energy efficient. You'd like to use solar, wind or micro-hydro energy, or build "green". There is a long list of alternative ways to produce or save energy, and most of that list can be found somewhere on the agenda for the Eleventh Annual North Country Sustainable Energy Fair at Canton College today and tomorrow. A panel on biodiesel kicks off the fair tonight at canton College. Martha Foley talked with Ann Heidenreich, of Community Energy Services, one of the organizers.  Go to full article

Biodiesel to Help Farmers and the Environment

There's been a lot of attention to biodiesel, and other alternative fuels. Biodiesel is made from agricultural products like soybeans or corn. It's environmentally friendly, less toxic than table salt, and runs in regular diesel engines. Biodiesel production got a late start in this country, but the industry has grown considerably in the past few years.

Legislators are hoping that New York State can become a leader in the alternative fuel industry. Recently Governor Pataki announced a state grant of $4 million to a biofuel plant in Fulton. It's the second alternative fuel facility in that area.

Last year Congress passed a tax credit for biodiesel to encourage demand. The Senate's recent Energy Bill extended the credit to 2010. Congressman John McHugh is pushing the House to do the same. As Gregory Warner reports, the credit will likely help North Country farmers, but there's a lot further to go.  Go to full article

Biodiesel Plant Shapes Up Slowly

Plans to build a biodiesel plant in St. Lawrence County are taking longer than expected. Canton College officials want to double the capacity of the factory. But they're still waiting for investors and federal legislation to make the project financially feasible. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

SUNY Canton to Spearhead Biodiesel Plant

SUNY Canton yesterday announced plans to help build a factory in the North Country that turns soybeans, corn, canola, and even used frying oil into fuel. As David Sommerstein reports, the college believes a biodiesel plant could create hundreds of jobs and provide a boost to ailing farms.  Go to full article
Joe Rappa shows off the final product.
Joe Rappa shows off the final product.

Biodiesel: Brew Your Own Fuel

Tomorrow in Canton the North Country Sustainable Energy Fair showcases alternative energies and conservation techniques, from wind and solar power to "green" construction. One presenter will share his experience turning used vegetable oil into biodiesel fuel to power his car. David Sommerstein has this profile.  Go to full article

Biodiesel Makes Inroads As Alternative Fuel

While the debate over the economic and ecological viability of ethanol continues, another fuel made from crops is becoming more available in the region. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Jonathan Ahl has more.  Go to full article

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