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News stories tagged with "biology"

Can you see the octopus on the right? The picture was taken from the underwater camera called a yo yo cam. Photo: Glenn Clark
Can you see the octopus on the right? The picture was taken from the underwater camera called a yo yo cam. Photo: Glenn Clark

Parishville-Hopkinton teacher coming home from Antarctica

With the continuing cold weather here in the North Country, it might feel like we're in Antarctica, but Parishville-Hopkinton biology teacher Glenn Clark has one on us in that regard. Clark returns to the North Country later this week after nearly two months in the real Antarctica; he was one of 17 teachers selected from across the country to work with the Arctic Research Consortium's PolarTREC program, studying climate change.

Clark lived and worked aboard the RV Palmer, an ice breaker research vessel near the Totten Glacier System on the eastern Antarctica coast, one of the most remote, uncharted regions of the world.

He's journaled about his experiences online, and spoken by phone with his students throughout the trip. Todd Moe caught up with him via satellite phone as the ship was heading north and he was packing up for the return trip (listen here.)  Go to full article
A turtle under the ice. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/90434877@N00/3206736457/">Richard Due</a>. Creative COmmons, some rights reserved
A turtle under the ice. Photo: Richard Due. Creative COmmons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: How do turtles survive a winter underwater?

Unlike frogs, turtles don't hibernate through the winter. In fact, sometimes you can see snappers and other species moving around under the ice. While their metabolism runs at very low ebb in the cold, they remain alert to changes in light and temperature that signal the coming spring.

How do they survive without oxygen? As Paul Smiths College biologist Curt Stager tells Martha Foley, they get energy from their body tissues, and their shells neutralize the resulting lactic acid build-up.  Go to full article
Penguins heading for open water. Photo: Glenn Clark
Penguins heading for open water. Photo: Glenn Clark

Parishville-Hopkinton teacher studies climate change in Antarctica

Have you seen a whale, penguin or seal lately? Parishville-Hopkinton biology teacher Glenn Clark has: He's in Antarctica right now. Clark is one of 17 teachers selected from across the country to work with the Arctic Research Consortium's PolarTREC program, studying climate change.

He's living and working aboard the RV Palmer, an ice breaker research vessel near the Totten Glacier System on the eastern Antarctica coast, one of the most remote, uncharted regions of the world.  Go to full article
Snowy Owl.  Photo:  Larry Master
Snowy Owl. Photo: Larry Master

More arctic wanderers heading south

More Snowy Owls have been sighted around the Northeast and Great Lakes states this winter. Kevin McGowan, a biologist at the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, says the recent Snowy Owl irruption is the largest seen in decades, and the large, white owls are expected to stick around through early spring. He spoke with Todd Moe.  Go to full article
<em>Elysia chlorotica</em> is a photosynthetic slug that uses chloroplasts from the algae it eats to make energy from sunlight. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Elysia_chlorotica_%281%29.jpg">Patrick Krug</a>, Cataloging Diversity in the Sacoglossa LifeDesk
Elysia chlorotica is a photosynthetic slug that uses chloroplasts from the algae it eats to make energy from sunlight. Photo: Patrick Krug, Cataloging Diversity in the Sacoglossa LifeDesk

Natural Selections: "Alternative" animals

In general, plants make food from sunlight, and animals fuel themselves by "burning" oxygen. But some animals think outside the box.

Curt stager and Martha Foley look at a photosynthetic slug that hijacks the genetic machinery of the algae in its diet, and at a jellyfish that needs no oxygen, burning the alternative fuels of hydrogen and sulphur.  Go to full article
Susan Willson and The Gorilla. Photo: Zach Hirsch
Susan Willson and The Gorilla. Photo: Zach Hirsch

Cat collar scholar: SLU biologist examines a new way to curb songbird mortality

Right now in the Canton-Potsdam area, there are about 50 people dressing their cats in technicolored, fluffy, Elizabethan collars. But they're not doing this because they think it's cute, or because they're making the next viral cat video.

The pets and their owners are part of a new study that has big implications for cats and their prey. Zach Hirsch has more.  Go to full article
Laura Von Rosk's <i>Mt. Coleman</i>.  The gallery talk on Saturday at Tannery Pond Community Center (4 pm) will include video work from filmmaker Hilary Hudson and musician Henry Kaiser.  Photo: Laura Von Rosk
Laura Von Rosk's Mt. Coleman. The gallery talk on Saturday at Tannery Pond Community Center (4 pm) will include video work from filmmaker Hilary Hudson and musician Henry Kaiser. Photo: Laura Von Rosk

Exploring art and science at the bottom of the world

An artist and a scientist will unveil a new exhibit Saturday afternoon at the Tannery Pond Community Center in North Creek. AntARTica includes works by artist Laura Von Rosk and cell biologist Sam Bowser. The exhibit will include Von Rosk's landscape paintings and Bowser's watercolor paintings of tiny, single-celled organisms called Foraminifera that live under the ice. The two were part of a team of biologists and artists that traveled to antarctica in 2011.

Todd Moe spoke with Bowser and Von Rosk about how artists and scientists can inspire each other and collaborate on projects.  Go to full article
Photo: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Photo: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Fossilized polar bear jawbone speaks to scientists about climate change

A 130,000 year old jawbone is providing a glimpse into how Polar Bears might react to the earth's rising temperature, thanks to researchers in Buffalo who recently investigated how polar bears responded to climate change in the past. Daniel Robison of the Innovation Trail reports.  Go to full article

DEC surveys waterbird populations on Little Galloo Island

Every 10 years or so, the Department of Environmental Conservation goes out to Little Galloo Island, which is 20 miles off the coast of Cape Vincent in Lake Ontario, to survey waterbird populations there.

The island, with a few dead trees, some grass and a rocky shoreline, is a haven for colonial waterbirds. It has nests of Caspian terns, herring gulls and tens of thousands of ring-billed gulls, the standard seagull seen throughout the north country.

It's a wildlife management area owned by the DEC. Reporter Joanna Richards accompanied the state biologists out to the island this spring to get a look at this special nesting ground and see how the DEC does its work.  Go to full article
Frog and flatfish, in stages of metamorphosis
Frog and flatfish, in stages of metamorphosis

Biologist passes along his fascination with metamorphosis

Dr. Alexander Schreiber studies change--the metamorphosis of amphibians and flatfish. His St. Lawrence University biology lab teems with frogs and fish in various stages of development.

His enthusiasm for his subject sends him off campus to local grade schools. And at SLU, it attracts even English majors like our intern, Roger Miller. Schreiber told Roger he just never stopped being a kid.

Roger Miller is a senior at St. Lawrence University. He's worked as an intern in our news and web departments for the last couple of years. We'll miss him, and wish him well after graduation this weekend.  Go to full article

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