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News stories tagged with "birds"

Botulism Killing Birds on St. Lawrence, Lake Ontario

State environment officials are investigating the deaths of sea birds in the Thousand Islands area of the St. Lawrence River and along the shore of Lake Ontario. The DEC says bird carcasses tested earlier this month showed contamination with type E botulism. As Brian Mann reports, the disease can harm humans who eat birds of fish poisoned with the toxin.  Go to full article
Listening for Bicknell's thrush
Listening for Bicknell's thrush

On Lyon Mountain, an Increasingly Rare Songbird Makes Itself Heard

Every summer, birders across the Adirondacks and the Green Mountains climb high looking for alpine songbirds. The annual census helps researchers to track the health and population of rare and endangered birds. Brian Mann joined a group on Lyon Mountain last month searching for the Bicknell's thrush. He sent this audio postcard.  Go to full article
Adirondack loons fitted with radio transmitters (Source:  ACLP)
Adirondack loons fitted with radio transmitters (Source: ACLP)

Satellites Track Adk Loons To Their Winter Grounds & Back Again

Yesterday, we profiled Nina Schoch, head of the Adirondack Cooperative Loon Program. Schoch has been studying loons for six years, measuring their exposure to acid rain and mercury and trying to get an accurate measure of the birds' population. This morning, Brian Mann talks with Schoch about a program developed two years ago that tracks loons using satellites and radio transmitters. The goal was to discover exactly where Adirondack loons spend their winters.  Go to full article
photo: Amy Freiman
photo: Amy Freiman

Leaving the Nest: Owlets in the Wild

Monday morning during the 8 O'Clock Hour, Martha Foley told the story of a Great Horned Owl chick--an owlet--found over the weekend on the ground. Martha's story brought a response from Amy Freiman, who lives in Newcomb, and is a licensed wildlife rehabilitator. You'll find Amy's photo of three owlets in today's "Photo of the Day" section of our website. She spoke with Martha Foley.  Go to full article
President Bush in Adirondacks 2002
President Bush in Adirondacks 2002

Clear Skies Plan Fails in Senate, Environmental Defeat For White House

The Bush Administration suffered a major defeat yesterday in the Senate. The Clear Skies initiative failed to pass a key committee vote, thanks in part to opposition from Vermont Senator Jim Jeffords and New York Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton. Clear Skies had been hailed by the power industry and by some pro-environment groups as a way to replace outdated pollution control laws. Opponents described the plan as a gift to coal-fired power plants in the Midwest that are blamed for much of the acid rain and Mercury pollution that hits the north country. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article
The "Phantom of the North", photo by Brian Sullivan
The "Phantom of the North", photo by Brian Sullivan

Great Gray Owl Glides Into NNY

The Great Gray Owl usually lives deep in the boreal forests of Canada. It's the official bird of the province of Manitoba. But due to scarce food and severe weather, thousands of the raptors have drifted south this year. They've invaded Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan, even southern Ontario and Quebec. But a Great Gray hadn't been spotted in New York State since 1996, according to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Until last Wednesday, that is, when ornithologist Gerry Smith spotted one in the farm fields between Clayton and Cape Vincent in Jefferson County. It so happened that David Sommerstein was there too and has the story.  Go to full article

Owl Invasion Affords Close-Up Observation

Great Gray Owl invasions, also called "irruptions", happen about once every ten years. But this one is the largest on record. Brian Sullivan is the project leader of the website, ebird.org, at the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology. Birders have posted Great Gray sightings from Minnesota to Montreal. Sullivan says it was only a matter of time until one was spotted in New York. Great Grays are one of the largest owls in North America, and they have a mysterious air about them. They're also known as the "Great Gray Ghost" and the "Phantom of the North". Sullivan told David Sommerstein despite those monikers, they're active during the day as well as night.  Go to full article

Birders' Passion Helps Scientists

Every year, tens of thousands of avid birdwatchers wander through frozen fields and marshy swamps. Their job is to record as many birds as they can find in a given area. For birders, it's a day to enjoy the outdoors while doing what they love most. But as the Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Karen Kelly reports, that passion serves another purpose - it helps scientists.  Go to full article

Audubon Society Cheers Congress for Bird Law

The National Audubon Society is praising Congress for strengthening protections for American migratory birds. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Erin Toner reports.  Go to full article
One of the Sibley series of Audubon guidebooks.
One of the Sibley series of Audubon guidebooks.

Birding With David Allen Sibley

All a birdwatcher needs, really, is a patch of the outdoors - or a window -- and something to sit on. Patience and binoculars help. But there ARE certain skills that earn SERIOUS birders treasured sitings of rare or shy species, and a deeper understanding of bird behavior. A couple of years ago, Martha Foley got an early morning lesson in the best practices from ornithologist and artist David Allen Sibley, author of the new series of Sibley bird books from the Audubon Society. Her story first aired last October.  Go to full article

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