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News stories tagged with "birds"

Owl Invasion Affords Close-Up Observation

Great Gray Owl invasions, also called "irruptions", happen about once every ten years. But this one is the largest on record. Brian Sullivan is the project leader of the website, ebird.org, at the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology. Birders have posted Great Gray sightings from Minnesota to Montreal. Sullivan says it was only a matter of time until one was spotted in New York. Great Grays are one of the largest owls in North America, and they have a mysterious air about them. They're also known as the "Great Gray Ghost" and the "Phantom of the North". Sullivan told David Sommerstein despite those monikers, they're active during the day as well as night.  Go to full article

Birders' Passion Helps Scientists

Every year, tens of thousands of avid birdwatchers wander through frozen fields and marshy swamps. Their job is to record as many birds as they can find in a given area. For birders, it's a day to enjoy the outdoors while doing what they love most. But as the Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Karen Kelly reports, that passion serves another purpose - it helps scientists.  Go to full article

Audubon Society Cheers Congress for Bird Law

The National Audubon Society is praising Congress for strengthening protections for American migratory birds. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Erin Toner reports.  Go to full article
One of the Sibley series of Audubon guidebooks.
One of the Sibley series of Audubon guidebooks.

Birding With David Allen Sibley

All a birdwatcher needs, really, is a patch of the outdoors - or a window -- and something to sit on. Patience and binoculars help. But there ARE certain skills that earn SERIOUS birders treasured sitings of rare or shy species, and a deeper understanding of bird behavior. A couple of years ago, Martha Foley got an early morning lesson in the best practices from ornithologist and artist David Allen Sibley, author of the new series of Sibley bird books from the Audubon Society. Her story first aired last October.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Ravens

Ravens, once common in the Adirondacks, disappeared during the early 20th Century, but are now reviving in the region. Martha Foley gives an eyewitness report. Dr. Curt Stager posits that the regrowth of woodland habitat, combined with rising road kill and other scavenger opportunities, account for the return of the ominous avian.  Go to full article

Bird Songs & Folksongs in the Adirondacks

Birders from across the state will gather at the Paul Smiths VIC this weekend for the second annual Great Adirondack Birding Festival. The event will feature bird walks, lectures, art, photography and a loon calling contest. On Sunday, the Saranac Lake Jazz Band, Dan Berggren, Dan Duggan and Peggy Lynn will take part in the annual Adirondack Music Celebration. Paul Smiths VIC spokesman Andy Flynn says the two events this weekend have been dubbed, "Spring into Song".  Go to full article

Natural Selections: The Barred Owl

Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley discuss the commonest northern forest member of the owl family. Curt's impersonation of this night hunter's call is hair-raising, and should be practiced, like a beginning bagpiper, far from other ears.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: How Birds Breathe

Respiration in birds in different from mammals and reptiles. In addition to lungs, birds have air sacs throughout the body. As Dr. Curt Stager explains, birds breathe in a four-step process, one inhalation and exhalation each for lungs and sacs. The process is more efficient for oxygen absorption, and as a side benefit, give birds an "air-cooled engine."  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Urban Birds

After a dip in bird populations, Curt Stager reports that numbers have increased, and in addition to birds that you'd expect to find in the city, some newcomers have moved into New York City's Central Park in the last few years, such as the peregrine falcon.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Penguins

Penguins, the formally-attired fowl of Antarctica, are true birds. Their furry-looking tuxedos are real feathers, and their flippers are wings on the inside, bone for bone. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about birds that fly underwater.  Go to full article

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