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News stories tagged with "birds"

photo: Amy Freiman
photo: Amy Freiman

Leaving the Nest: Owlets in the Wild

Monday morning during the 8 O'Clock Hour, Martha Foley told the story of a Great Horned Owl chick--an owlet--found over the weekend on the ground. Martha's story brought a response from Amy Freiman, who lives in Newcomb, and is a licensed wildlife rehabilitator. You'll find Amy's photo of three owlets in today's "Photo of the Day" section of our website. She spoke with Martha Foley.  Go to full article
President Bush in Adirondacks 2002
President Bush in Adirondacks 2002

Clear Skies Plan Fails in Senate, Environmental Defeat For White House

The Bush Administration suffered a major defeat yesterday in the Senate. The Clear Skies initiative failed to pass a key committee vote, thanks in part to opposition from Vermont Senator Jim Jeffords and New York Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton. Clear Skies had been hailed by the power industry and by some pro-environment groups as a way to replace outdated pollution control laws. Opponents described the plan as a gift to coal-fired power plants in the Midwest that are blamed for much of the acid rain and Mercury pollution that hits the north country. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article
The "Phantom of the North", photo by Brian Sullivan
The "Phantom of the North", photo by Brian Sullivan

Great Gray Owl Glides Into NNY

The Great Gray Owl usually lives deep in the boreal forests of Canada. It's the official bird of the province of Manitoba. But due to scarce food and severe weather, thousands of the raptors have drifted south this year. They've invaded Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan, even southern Ontario and Quebec. But a Great Gray hadn't been spotted in New York State since 1996, according to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Until last Wednesday, that is, when ornithologist Gerry Smith spotted one in the farm fields between Clayton and Cape Vincent in Jefferson County. It so happened that David Sommerstein was there too and has the story.  Go to full article

Owl Invasion Affords Close-Up Observation

Great Gray Owl invasions, also called "irruptions", happen about once every ten years. But this one is the largest on record. Brian Sullivan is the project leader of the website, ebird.org, at the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology. Birders have posted Great Gray sightings from Minnesota to Montreal. Sullivan says it was only a matter of time until one was spotted in New York. Great Grays are one of the largest owls in North America, and they have a mysterious air about them. They're also known as the "Great Gray Ghost" and the "Phantom of the North". Sullivan told David Sommerstein despite those monikers, they're active during the day as well as night.  Go to full article

Birders' Passion Helps Scientists

Every year, tens of thousands of avid birdwatchers wander through frozen fields and marshy swamps. Their job is to record as many birds as they can find in a given area. For birders, it's a day to enjoy the outdoors while doing what they love most. But as the Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Karen Kelly reports, that passion serves another purpose - it helps scientists.  Go to full article

Audubon Society Cheers Congress for Bird Law

The National Audubon Society is praising Congress for strengthening protections for American migratory birds. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Erin Toner reports.  Go to full article
One of the Sibley series of Audubon guidebooks.
One of the Sibley series of Audubon guidebooks.

Birding With David Allen Sibley

All a birdwatcher needs, really, is a patch of the outdoors - or a window -- and something to sit on. Patience and binoculars help. But there ARE certain skills that earn SERIOUS birders treasured sitings of rare or shy species, and a deeper understanding of bird behavior. A couple of years ago, Martha Foley got an early morning lesson in the best practices from ornithologist and artist David Allen Sibley, author of the new series of Sibley bird books from the Audubon Society. Her story first aired last October.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Ravens

Ravens, once common in the Adirondacks, disappeared during the early 20th Century, but are now reviving in the region. Martha Foley gives an eyewitness report. Dr. Curt Stager posits that the regrowth of woodland habitat, combined with rising road kill and other scavenger opportunities, account for the return of the ominous avian.  Go to full article

Bird Songs & Folksongs in the Adirondacks

Birders from across the state will gather at the Paul Smiths VIC this weekend for the second annual Great Adirondack Birding Festival. The event will feature bird walks, lectures, art, photography and a loon calling contest. On Sunday, the Saranac Lake Jazz Band, Dan Berggren, Dan Duggan and Peggy Lynn will take part in the annual Adirondack Music Celebration. Paul Smiths VIC spokesman Andy Flynn says the two events this weekend have been dubbed, "Spring into Song".  Go to full article

Natural Selections: The Barred Owl

Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley discuss the commonest northern forest member of the owl family. Curt's impersonation of this night hunter's call is hair-raising, and should be practiced, like a beginning bagpiper, far from other ears.  Go to full article

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