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News stories tagged with "bloomingdale"

Perhaps the most unusual bird on the count was a leucistic black-capped Chickadee at a Bloomingdale feeder (photo: Larry Master)
Perhaps the most unusual bird on the count was a leucistic black-capped Chickadee at a Bloomingdale feeder (photo: Larry Master)

Volunteers flock to annual bird count

For the 108th year, volunteer birders fanned out across the country for the annual birding census earlier this winter. The all-volunteer effort takes a snapshot of bird populations to monitor their status and distribution across the Western Hemisphere. The Audubon Society started the Christmas Bird Count in 1900 as an alternative to a Victorian-era holiday hunting tradition of shooting the greatest number of birds. Today, data collected during the Christmas Bird Count helps researchers monitor bird behavior and bird conservation. You could call it bird watching with a benefit. Todd Moe tagged along with some Adirondack bird enthusiasts who began their avian adventure at first light.  Go to full article

Book review: "Over the Mountain and Home Again"

In 1992, Edward Kanze and his wife Debbie bought an old camp on 18 acres of land bordering the Saranac River in Bloomingdale. Kanze's new book, Over the Mountain and Home Again, explores that land and the surrounding Adirondack wilderness. Betsy Kepes has this book review.  Go to full article

Ed Kanze: It Does Strike Twice

Martha Foley talks with Ed Kanze, writer and naturalist in Bloomingdale who's been struck by lightning twice.  Go to full article

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