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News stories tagged with "blue-green-algae"

Algae bloom. Photo: Lake George Waterkeeper
Algae bloom. Photo: Lake George Waterkeeper

Blue green algae may have caused fish kill in Lake Champlain

Blue-green algae blooms in Lake Champlain have intensified with late summer heat. Rouses Point, Missisquoi Bay, and North Beach in Burlington all issued warnings last week, and scientists say the algae blooms may have triggered a fish kill several weeks ago in Missisquoi Bay.  Go to full article
Archival photograph of blue green algae from the Vermont Department of Health
Archival photograph of blue green algae from the Vermont Department of Health

Toxic blue green algae plagues Lake Champlain

Health officials in New York and Vermont say there have already been at least two outbreaks of toxic blue-green algae on Lake Champlain. The first was reported last week near the Crown Point bridge. The second, reported Tuesday, forced closure of the public beaches in Port Henry. There have also been reports of outbreaks near Burlington and Missisquoi Bay. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article
The International Joint Commission in St Armand, Quebec
The International Joint Commission in St Armand, Quebec

Public hearings in VT, Quebec on phosphorus in Lake Champlain's Missisquoi Bay

Missisquoi Bay is in the northeast corner of Lake Champlain, along the Vermont-Quebec border. The bay has some of the highest phosphorus concentrations in the lake and is frequently plagued by blue/green algae. In 2008, the US government asked the International Joint Commission, a bi-national body that helps manage US and Canadian boundary waters, to assist in reducing phosphorus levels in the bay.

They've now completed a study that identifies where the phosphorus is coming from and how it gets to the lake. Two public hearings are underway to discuss the results. Sarah Harris was at last night's meeting in Saint Armand, Quebec and has more.  Go to full article

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