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News stories tagged with "boating"

The view from the boat. Photo: Sarah Harris
The view from the boat. Photo: Sarah Harris

Sailing on Lake Champlain

Sailing is a big part of life on Lake Champlain. Each summer, marinas from Whitehall to Rouses Point fill up with boats - and a lot of them belong to Canadians.  Go to full article
The Iroquois Dam helps control water levels on the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario. Photo courtesy New York Power Authority
The Iroquois Dam helps control water levels on the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario. Photo courtesy New York Power Authority

IJC prepares for hearings on "modified" water levels plan

A binational agency is poised to take another step towards revising the way water levels are managed on the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario.

The International Joint Commission says it "aims" to hold public hearings on changing the 55-year-old system as early as next month.  Go to full article
Iroquois Dam. Photo courtesy New York Power Authority
Iroquois Dam. Photo courtesy New York Power Authority

Why low Lake Ontario levels mean high St. Lawrence levels

We've reported for months - years even - that the Great Lakes, from Superior to Ontario, are at historically low water levels.

So we were surprised to get the news this week that regulators are lowering the gates at the Iroquois Dam near Ogdensburg because the St. Lawrence River is too high.

It's quite a puzzle.  Go to full article
Champlain Canal, First Lock. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/ifl/">Peretz Partensky</a> cc <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Champlain Canal, First Lock. Photo: Peretz Partensky cc some rights reserved

Vermont Senator pressures NYS to close Champlain Canal

New York State is under increasing pressure to close the Champlain Canal to keep a new invasive species out of Lake Champlain. Vermont Senator Patrick Leahy yesterday blasted New York for "ignoring" the threat of the spiny water flea. The water flea was discovered earlier this month in the Feeder Canal near Glens Falls, and the Champlain Canal, both operated by New York.

The Champlain Canal is 60 miles long. It was built at the same time the Erie Canal was constructed to connect the Hudson River to Lake Champlain. It stretches through Rensselaer, Saratoga and Washington counties, from Waterford past Ft. Edward to Whitehall.

Adirondack Bureau Chief Brian Mann has covered both Lake Champlain and invasive species and joined Martha Foley for an update this morning.  Go to full article
Competitor number on a 50th anniversary race guideboat
Competitor number on a 50th anniversary race guideboat

50th Anniversary Willard Hanmer Guideboat Races

The Willard Hanmer Guideboat Race in Saranac Lake celebrated it's 50th anniversary this past weekend. Following tradition it was held on the closest Sunday to 4th of July.

See the slideshow below

Hanmer was a guideboat builder in Saranac Lake from 1930 until his death in 1962 at the age of 60. He learned the craft from his father. The race was created in Hanmer's memory in 1962 and has been held every year since, 2012 being the 50th. After Hanmer's death, his wife sold the boat shop on Lake Street to Carl Hathaway, who apprenticed under Hanmer, and built guideboats in it until 1991 when he sold it to its current boat builder Chris Woodward who apprenticed under Hathaway.

The "two Chris's", Chris Woodward of the Woodward Boatshop and Chris Covert of Guideboat Realty are the race organizers and sponsors. The race has seen dwindling participation in recent years, however this year's event, with support from the Saranac Lake Women's Civic Chamber, saw a resurgence to it's former glory with a significant turnout.

The biggest attraction was the parade of almost 60 guideboats that did a parade lap around Lake Flower commemorating the 50th Hanmer race. In one of the lead boats of the parade were octogenarians Natalie Leduc from Saranac Lake and Jim Frenette of Tupper Lake, both former competitors in the Hanmer Race.  Go to full article
Hydrilla. Photo: Purdue Extension
Hydrilla. Photo: Purdue Extension

NY boaters asked to help prevent spread of invasive water plant

Hydrilla is one of the most aggressive, invasive water plants. Its long, trailing stems form thick mats that prevent native water vegetation and fish from getting enough oxygen, light and nutrients.

Hydrilla was found at Cayuga Inlet, near Ithaca, last August. If unchecked it could spread Cayuga Lake, other Finger Lakes, as well as Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. Cornell Cooperative Extension is warning recreational boaters to take precautions and prevent the spread of the invasive plant. Sarah Harris has more.  Go to full article
Most recreational boaters don't have expensive navigation tools. (Photo: Julie Grant)
Most recreational boaters don't have expensive navigation tools. (Photo: Julie Grant)

Security complicates boating along the border

It's been a year of uncertainty for boaters along the St. Lawrence River. The U.S.-Canada border snakes down the St. Lawrence through the Thousand Islands past Massena, NY. When Canadian border agents seized an American fishing boat earlier this season, they upset a long held understanding of U.S. boaters. Roy Anderson hadn't docked or anchored. He had simply drifted across the international border.

Canadian border agents said Anderson hadn't checked in at a port of entry. They forced him to pay $1000 or have his boat seized. American boaters were shocked. They didn't know they needed to check in with Canada when drifting.

Anderson has since gotten most of his money back from the Canadian government. And politicians on both sides of the border are trying to provide some clarity about what is and isn't OK. Charter boat captains hope something can be done. They say the dispute is bad for business. Julie Grant went to Clayton to see firsthand the challenges of boating the border.  Go to full article
Our primary purpose is to return the River to the position it was in two months ago.

Owens proposes customs ease on River

North Country Congressman Bill Owens and his counterpart in Canada want to make it easier for boaters to cruise the Thousand Islands without running afoul of border check-in requirements.

In a phone press conference Wednesday, Owens said he's introduced a bill in the House that would allow Canadian boaters to cross the international border without checking in with customs officers as long as they don't stop in U.S. territory. Canada would pass a similar law for U.S. boaters.  Go to full article
The Thousand Islands divided by the international border ©Google
The Thousand Islands divided by the international border Google

Canadian fine prompts confusion on the St. Lawrence

There's a lot of confusion today among boaters, fishermen and others in the thousand islands region. This after the State Department said Tuesday that Canadian Border Officials were well within their rights to threaten to seize an American fisherman's boat, and fine him a thousand dollars for fishing in Canadian waters without registering at customs.  Go to full article
Theyre worried about will this happen again to other Americans during the summer

Lawmakers question St. Lawrence boat seizure

Lawmakers on both sides of the border are looking for answers after a fisherman's boat was seized in Canadian waters on the St. Lawrence River.

Canadian border agents said U.S. citizen, Roy Anderson, didn't check in at a port of entry. They fined Anderson a thousand dollars.

But Anderson's boat wasn't docked or anchored. Lawmakers say requiring boats that drift across the international border to check in would wreak havoc on the fishing and tourism industries. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

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