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News stories tagged with "boats"

(photo: Brad Miller)
(photo: Brad Miller)

Schmitt to take the helm at boat museum

The Antique Boat Museum in Clayton will have a new leader later this spring. John MacLean, the museum's executive director for the last 8 years, is retiring in May and the Board of Trustees has named Fred Schmitt as the new director. Schmitt will oversee the museum's campus along the St. Lawrence, eight buildings, more than 270 antique boats and 40 full and part-time employees. He told Todd Moe that he has an academic background in history and museum studies, nearly 30 years of management and consulting experience with businesses and organizations worldwide -- and a love of boats.  Go to full article
Peter Hornbeck in his shop in Olmstedville (Source:  Hornbeck boats website)
Peter Hornbeck in his shop in Olmstedville (Source: Hornbeck boats website)

Hornbeck says he?s been misportrayed in APA confirm fight

Governor David Paterson has nominated businessman and environmental activist Peter Hornbeck to serve on the Adirondack Park Agency board. Hornbeck, a boatbuilder from Olmstedville, has the support of his local town board and supervisor. In a letter issued last week, Minerva town supervisor Sue Montgomery-Corey described Hornbeck as intelligent and thoughtful.

"We believe that he will represent the needs of Adirondack communities and businesses well," Corey wrote.

But Hornbeck's nomination has drawn fire from other local government groups in the Adirondacks and from state Senator Betty Little. They point to the fact that he serves on the board of Protect the Adirondacks, a group that is currently suing the APA. Last week, Senator Little predicted that Hornbeck wouldn't be confirmed by the state Senate.

Until now, Hornbeck himself has kept quiet about the uproar that has erupted around his candidacy. But on Friday he spoke in-depth with Brian Mann.  Go to full article

APA opens hearings on boathouse rules

The Adirondack Park Agency convened the first of four public hearings on new rules for boathouses last night at its headquarters in Ray Brook. The proposal limits new boathouses to 900 square feet in size, 15 feet in height, and sets a minimum roof pitch for a boathouse. Contractors, architects and environmentalists turned out to comment. Chris Knight reports.

(The APA has scheduled three more public hearings on the revised boathouse definition: tonight in Old Forge and Thursday in Albany and Lake George.)  Go to full article

APA Board Rejects Lows Lake Waters Classification

The Adirondack Park Agency Board of Commissioners rejected a plan on Friday that would have classified the lakebed of Lows Lake as wilderness. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article
Lois McClure under sail (Source: LCMM)
Lois McClure under sail (Source: LCMM)

In Essex, a sunny celebration of the Champlain Quadricentennial

Quadricentennial events continue all summer long in the Champlain Valley, celebrating the four hundredth anniversary of Samuel de Champlain's arrival in the region. Brian Mann stopped by for the Essex Day celebration in the town of Essex on Saturday and he sent this audio postcard.  Go to full article
Jonathan Jenkins and Ellen Giraud won Cranberry Lake's first Cardboard Boat Race.
Jonathan Jenkins and Ellen Giraud won Cranberry Lake's first Cardboard Boat Race.

Cardboard boats inspire ingenuity, fun

The Cranberry Lake Boat Club is celebrating its centennial with a series of events this summer. Last Sunday, dozens gathered to watch homemade boats, made of cardboard, duct tape, layer after layer of glue and paint, race around a buoy near the town beach. Teams displayed their makeshift boats as each was called one-by-one to the water. So, do cardboard boats sink or sail? Todd Moe found that most were seaworthy.  Go to full article
Dale Henry (r) and apprentice Brian McDonald (l) work on the bateau at Fort Ticonderoga
Dale Henry (r) and apprentice Brian McDonald (l) work on the bateau at Fort Ticonderoga

Wood, work, patience and finally, a bateau!

An authentic British wooden bateau is being built on the grounds of Fort Ticonderoga this month. Two stalwarts in the preservation and re-creation of Colonial American traditions, Fort Ticonderoga and the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum have collaborated on the project. Bateau were nautical "work horses," used for everything from ferrying troops to hauling supplies and farm animals. The bateau is taking shape under the skilled hands of Dale Henry. His crew is working only with hand tools and using construction techniques that date back to the 18th century. Henry told Todd Moe the boat itself is based on the remains of a bateau raised from the lake floor in 1960.  Go to full article

Preview: No-Octane Regatta in Tupper Lake

NCPR is media sponsor for the No-Octane Regatta this Saturday at Little Wolf Lake just outside Tupper Lake. The event is open to all people-powered small craft, with a special emphasis on wooden boats. Todd Moe talks with co-organizer Hallie Bond about what's new at the regatta this year.  Go to full article
The new hybrid speedboat from Frauscher (Photo courtesy of California Chris Craft)
The new hybrid speedboat from Frauscher (Photo courtesy of California Chris Craft)

Green technology hits the water

A green technology popular on highways is now ready for the waterways just in time for summer. Only one catch: the world's first hybrid recreational boat could put a hole in your wallet. Tamara Keith reports.  Go to full article

Very special place: Hanmer Boat Shop

The dying art of building a boat by hand is still being kept alive by a few talented craftsmen in the North Country. The Hanmer boat shop in Saranac Lake has changed hands twice in its nearly one-hundred-year history and is now called the Woodward Boat Shop, but it's mission remains the same: to build and restore the classic Adirondack guide boat. Today NCPR and TAUNY, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, continue our look at some very special places in the North Country. Varick Chittenden has visited the boat shop on several occasions and he talked with Joel Hurd about the shop, and the importance of the Adirondack guide boat to the region's history.  Go to full article

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