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News stories tagged with "border"

Lines at a Quebec-Vermont border crossing. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/premshree/2535275511/">Premshree Pillai</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Lines at a Quebec-Vermont border crossing. Photo: Premshree Pillai, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Customs: possible traffic delays at Quebec border

ST. ALBANS, Vt. (AP) U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials say there could be traffic delays at the Vermont-Canadian border during Quebec's two-week "Construction Holiday."

The annual holiday from July 20 through Aug. 2 could cause increased traffic since many residents from Quebec, including those not in the construction industry, go on vacation during this time.  Go to full article
The border crossing at CHamplain, NY. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mpd01605/3939455673/">Bobby Hidy</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
The border crossing at CHamplain, NY. Photo: Bobby Hidy, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

US border officials say to check traffic

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) Customs officials in Buffalo are advising travelers crossing the Canadian border to prepare for potentially longer wait times when the summer travel season starts this weekend.

With the Memorial Day weekend ahead, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection says travelers should allow for extra time in case of heavy traffic. They suggest choosing the least congested border crossing among the four in the Buffalo/Niagara region.  Go to full article
U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, Export-Import Bank president Fred Hochberg, and Congressman Bill Owens in Ogdensburg. Photo: Zach Hirsch
U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, Export-Import Bank president Fred Hochberg, and Congressman Bill Owens in Ogdensburg. Photo: Zach Hirsch

Exporting North Country goods with fewer headaches

Each year, billions of dollars in material goods flow between New York and Canada. On the North Country side of the border, more and more businesses are realizing they could make good money when they export their products.

For smaller businesses, though, dealing with foreign customers and distributers can be complicated and expensive.

But at a roundtable discussion in Ogdensburg on Friday, officials told North Country business owners they can make it easier to jump into the game of international trade.  Go to full article
The border crossing at CHamplain, NY. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mpd01605/3939455673/">Bobby Hidy</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
The border crossing at CHamplain, NY. Photo: Bobby Hidy, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Rep. Owens touts more border staff in northern NY

CHAMPLAIN, N.Y. (AP) A congressman says recently announced staffing increases along U.S. borders will help northern New York's economy.

U.S. Rep. Bill Owens says custom officials estimate there will be 20 more staffers at both the Champlain and Alexandria Bay crossings by the end of fiscal year 2015.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/lavagabunda/3619026326/">Sandra Cuffe</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Sandra Cuffe, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Mohawks threaten to boycott Canadian customs

Mohawks on the Canadian side of Akwesasne say they'll boycott Canadian customs if progress isn't made in talks with the Canadian government.  Go to full article
The new, low-level bridge going up last summer underneath the old span to Cornwall. Photo: Mohawk Council of Akwesasne  Communications.
The new, low-level bridge going up last summer underneath the old span to Cornwall. Photo: Mohawk Council of Akwesasne Communications.

New Cornwall bridge opens, but it still feels closed to Mohawks

Friday at 7am, Canada opens a new bridge across the St. Lawrence River to Cornwall. Officials said the $75 million project will speed up travel and contribute to economic growth.

The port-of-entry into Canada has been plagued by long wait times since it was moved off Cornwall Island four years ago.

But Akwesasne Mohawks say the new bridge won't make traffic move faster. And they say the new bridge won't do anything to ease travel between Mohawk communities divided by the international border. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
The 52-year-old high-level bridge to Cornwall will be demolished over the next two years. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/michelgagnon/8465547137/">Michel Gagnon</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
The 52-year-old high-level bridge to Cornwall will be demolished over the next two years. Photo: Michel Gagnon, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

New Cornwall bridge to open Friday

Travellers in and around Cornwall will finally get to use the new low-level bridge to Cornwall Island and the United States. The long-anticipated span is slated to open tomorrow morning at 7 am.  Go to full article
Eileen Simollardes (at right) from Vermont Gas outlines the pipeline project.  Cornwall select board chairman Bruce Hiland (in blue) looks on at left.  (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Eileen Simollardes (at right) from Vermont Gas outlines the pipeline project. Cornwall select board chairman Bruce Hiland (in blue) looks on at left. (Photo: Brian Mann)

NY-VT tension shapes Ticonderoga gas pipeline project

The US and Canada are carrying more and more energy produced in North America on rail tank cars. That's controversial, especially after this summer's disaster in Lac-Megantic.

But there's also a fierce debate underway over construction of new pipelines to carry the surge of domestic natural gas and oil. Much of the controversy has focused on the Keystone XL project in the Midwest. But we have our own pipeline battle shaping up here in the North Country.

A company in Vermont hopes to build a new line that would feed natural gas from Vermont underneath Lake Champlain to the International Paper mill in Ticonderoga. Some environmental activists and local government leaders in Vermont are promising to block the project unless major changes are made.  Go to full article
Lac-Megantic burning on the first day after the rail car derailment sent fireballs and streams of burning oil coursing through the Quebec village.  (Photo:  Surete du Quebec)
Lac-Megantic burning on the first day after the rail car derailment sent fireballs and streams of burning oil coursing through the Quebec village. (Photo: Surete du Quebec)

In Lac-Megantic, grief and resilience

Back in July, a massive tanker train filled with petroleum from North Dakota derailed in a tiny town in Quebec.
Explosions and fire ripped through the village, killing 47 people and destroying the downtown of Lac-Megantic.

Brian Mann has been covering the aftermath of that disaster for NPR and North Country Public Radio.

He was in Quebec on assignment again over the weekend. He joined Martha Foley on the line from NCPR's bureau in Saranac Lake.  Go to full article

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