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News stories tagged with "border"

Montreal police have struggled to cope with three months of continuing demonstrations. Photo: Monica Eileen Patterson
Montreal police have struggled to cope with three months of continuing demonstrations. Photo: Monica Eileen Patterson

In Montreal, student protests target Quebec's Liberal government

Massive demonstrations in the city of Montreal have continued for more than a hundred straight days.

The protest began when Quebec's Liberal Party tried to hike tuition rates for college students. But the sometimes violent street rallies have exploded into a much wider debate in French Canada over civil liberties and the future of popular social programs.

As Brian Mann reports, some students are now calling for the resignation of Quebec's premier.  Go to full article
Student strikes have swept Montreal for more than 100 days. Photo: Monica Patterson
Student strikes have swept Montreal for more than 100 days. Photo: Monica Patterson

Montreal student protests widen, tackle big Quebec questions

For more than 100 days, the city of Montreal has been rocked by massive student protests - rallies and marches which have grown on some days to include tens of thousands of people.

The movement was sparked by a move by Quebec's provincial government to raise student tuitions. But an effort by Prime Minister Jean Charest to crack down on street marches and limit protests earlier this month triggered a political backlash.

Brian Mann has been traveling to Montreal to cover the street protests there, for NCPR, NPR and for PRI's The World. He joined Martha Foley on the line from our bureau in Saranac Lake.  Go to full article
A portion of the proposed underwater power cable route.
A portion of the proposed underwater power cable route.

NYS Senator says Lake Champlain power cable will stifle Upstate power

A State senator from Niagara county is pushing back against a plan to pipe more electricity from producers in Canada to consumers in New York City.

Senator George Maziarz says the big electricity transmission line planned to run under the water of Lake Champlain and the Hudson River would edge out power producers here in New York. Martha Foley has details.  Go to full article
Students on strike in Montreal. Photo: Yanik Crépeau
Students on strike in Montreal. Photo: Yanik Crépeau

Montreal tense after months of student unrest

Austerity measures in Europe have sparked protests and political chaos. But belt tightening has also sparked unrest closer to home. In the province of Quebec, a plan to hike university tuitions has led to weeks of violent rallies, civil disobedience, and clashes with police.

As North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann reports, the US Consulate in Montreal has issued a security warning to American travelers in the city.  Go to full article
Indian River Lakes Conservancy region (Source: IRLC website)
Indian River Lakes Conservancy region (Source: IRLC website)

Indian River Lakes Conservancy expands, builds bridge to Canada

On Friday, North Country Public Radio reported that some small land conservation deals are still moving forward in the Adirondack Park, despite the state's cash crunch. Groups outside the blue line are also working to protect key parcels of open space.

This spring, the Indian River Lakes Conservancy in the St. Lawrence Valley bought another parcel of wetlands and shorelines around Grass Lake, using a major grand from the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The group now owns more than 1500 acres.

As Brian Mann reports, the land could serve as part of a key wildlife corridor between the Adirondacks in New York and Algonquin Park in Canada.  Go to full article
A Trans Canada worker inspects a pumping station in Steele City, Nebraska. Photos: Brian Mann
A Trans Canada worker inspects a pumping station in Steele City, Nebraska. Photos: Brian Mann

New York and the US look to Canada for energy, raising big questions about the environment

North Country congressman Bill Owens is praising a Canadian company for its plan to move forward with construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. Owens' backing for the controversial pipeline comes at a time when New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is also pushing a plan to import more hydro-electric power from Quebec.

Canada is already the biggest foreign supplier of energy to the US. And across the political spectrum, American leaders see Canada as a safer alternative to energy suppliers in the Middle East and Central America.

But there are growing questions about the environmental costs to Canada's energy boom and the debate is causing some Canadians to rethink their country's image as one of the world's most environmentally friendly societies. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
Cargo ship discharging ballast water. Photo: USCG
Cargo ship discharging ballast water. Photo: USCG

NY scraps tough ballast water regs, prompting praise and rebuke

On Friday, we reported that New York state is pushing Federal officials to toughen proposed new standards for ballast water pollution on freighters using the St. Lawrence Seaway.

In that report, we mistakenly reported that the Cuomo administration is still planning to implement its own set of ballast water regulations, scheduled to go into effect next year.

But officials in Albany say they've decided to scrap the state rules, a move that's drawing mixed reviews from industry groups and environmentalists. Brian Mann has our update.  Go to full article
Using a refractometer to test salinity in ballast water. Photo: David Sommerstein
Using a refractometer to test salinity in ballast water. Photo: David Sommerstein

NY pushes Obama administration to toughen ballast water protections

A state vs. federal feud over ballast water carried by ocean-going freighters is heating up again.

New York is steward of a long stretch of the St. Lawrence River. Since the St. Lawrence Seaway was opened to international shipping in the 50s, it's been a major route for invasive species that have ended up in the Great Lakes and their tributaries.

The state's Department of Environmental Conservation has tough ballast water standards set to go into effect next year. The DEC -- and many environmentalists -- think the strict new rules are needed to keep more invasive plants and animals from reaching the US.

Officials with the federal Environmental Protection Agency -- along with the shipping industry -- think less stringent laws will keep invasives out - and they say their standards are achievable.

Brian Mann spoke about the debate with Martha Foley.  Go to full article
The International Joint Commission focuses on water levels in the Great Lake system.
The International Joint Commission focuses on water levels in the Great Lake system.

Save the River focuses on water levels plan

A new plan for controlling water levels in Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River will be the main agenda item at Save the River's annual conference at the Clayton Opera House this weekend.

The new plan allows water levels to stay high (or low) for longer periods than the current plan does. The more natural fluctuations are intended to restore diversity in the shoreline ecosystems. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article
Wolfe Island Wind Farm.  Photo: Chris Trimmer and Aleksandra Bragoszewska
Wolfe Island Wind Farm. Photo: Chris Trimmer and Aleksandra Bragoszewska

Wolfe Island, transformed by wind power

Most experts agree we need to move toward renewable energy to save the planet. Giant wind farms are already up and running across America - from the high deserts of California to the North Country's Tug Hill Plateau. And from coast to coast, communities have been divided over wind power development. Supporters around the nation imagine wind providing clean energy--and green jobs--for generations to come. But wind farms have a downside.

In 2009, dozens of wind towers were installed on Wolfe Island on the Canadian side of the border, just where Lake Ontario feeds into the St. Lawrence River. The turbines rise like thirty story buildings, transforming the landscape and sharply dividing a once-sleepy farming community. This audio collage, produced by Chris Trimmer and Aleksandra Bragoszewska of Kingston, Ontario for Front and Center, captures the low roar of the turbines and the dissonance they've spread in the community.  Go to full article

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