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News stories tagged with "botany"

Bumblebee pollinating blueberries. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/people/pollinatorsinfo/">Athena Rayne Anderson</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Bumblebee pollinating blueberries. Photo: Athena Rayne Anderson, CC some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Native pollinators

With the collapse of the population of the European honeybee, introduced to North America in colonial times, many growers are looking for aids in pollinating their crops. But the honeybee may not be the most effective bee. Bumblebees and other native pollinators do a better job on crops like blueberries and cranberries. Martha Foley and Curt Stager discuss.  Go to full article
Burl on a sequoia tree. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/people/hickstro/">Troy Hicks</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Burl on a sequoia tree. Photo: Troy Hicks, CC some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Burl wood

Burl wood, the knobs of complex grain that some trees form, is prized by woodworkers for its beauty and utility. What causes wood grain to deviate from the straight and narrow in this way is something of a mystery. Martha Foley and Curt Stager try to untangle the knot.  Go to full article
Some are plants, some not so much. Blanket of brilliant green moss, mounds of reindeer lichens, and conifer saplings growing on smooth rock banks between Blue Ridge and Newcomb. Archive Photo of the Day: Ann Pilcher.
Some are plants, some not so much. Blanket of brilliant green moss, mounds of reindeer lichens, and conifer saplings growing on smooth rock banks between Blue Ridge and Newcomb. Archive Photo of the Day: Ann Pilcher.

Natural Selections: What is a plant?

Mushrooms grow out of the soil like plants, but are fungi. Lichens may look leafy, but they are symbiotic colonies of fungi and algae. Seaweed looks like a plant, but is an algae colony. And Indian Pipe looks like a fungi, but is a plant. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager discuss the ins and outs of botany.  Go to full article
Haircap moss, showing both "generations." Photo: <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Fabelfroh">Kristian Peters</a>, CC <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/en:GNU_Free_Documentation_License">some rights reserved</a>
Haircap moss, showing both "generations." Photo: Kristian Peters, CC some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Alternation of generations

What if people gave birth to puppies, and those puppies in turn gave birth to people? That's similar to what some species, such as haircap moss, do. Each alternate generation has a different form and function. Dr Curt Stager and Martha Foley explore the biological oddity "alternation of generations."  Go to full article
How fluids move in plants.
How fluids move in plants.

Natural Selections: Plant blood

Do plants have blood? How does the human circulatory system compare to that of plants and trees? Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager tackle the question.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Ghosts of Evolution

Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley discuss plants that have outlived the animals they co-evolved with.  Go to full article
(Photo: Wikipedia)
(Photo: Wikipedia)

Natural Selections: Poison Ivy

"Leaves of three, let it be." Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about poison ivy. They discuss whether it's really an ivy, why we call it "poison," and how humans and animals react differently to the plant.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Bamboo

This hollow reed, prized for everything from fishing poles to furniture, may grow to tree height, but as Dr Curt Stager and Martha Foley explain, is actually a grass.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Tree Shapes

Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager explain how tree shapes, like our own physical shapes, are determined by both genetics and environment.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Plant defenses

Plants have a number of ways of defending themselves from predation and parasites. Martha Foley and Curt Stager talk about some of them, including wild tobacco which, in addition to its toxic nicotine content, emits chemicals into the air which repel attackers.  Go to full article

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