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News stories tagged with "campaign-finance-reform"

Empire Plaza in Albany.
Empire Plaza in Albany.

Reformers focus on "useless" state Board of Elections

Reform groups are focusing attention on Governor Cuomo's anti corruption commission's recommendations to beef up the anemic State Board of Elections but say they have not given up hope of public campaign financing for state wide races.  Go to full article
A lot of things will need to come together inside the NYS Capitol to get to an end-of-session deal. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/54021469@N00/394233312/">Holley St. Germain</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
A lot of things will need to come together inside the NYS Capitol to get to an end-of-session deal. Photo: Holley St. Germain, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Down to the wire on hot-button issues in Albany

It's getting down to the wire for major pieces of legislation still pending in Albany. As the end of session approaches in Albany, there are no agreements yet on a number of hot-button issues, including women's rights and campaign finance reform.

But that's not unusual in a government where last minute deals are part of the routine.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/25947183@N04/5728324248/">Ove Overmeyer</a>, CC some rights reserved
Photo: Ove Overmeyer, CC some rights reserved

Is it time for reform at the state Board of Elections?

Anti-corruption proposals are proliferating in Albany, following two high profile bribery scandals. Some of them focus on the long neglected state Board of Elections, which hasn't even had an investigator on staff in over a year.  Go to full article
NY Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:SpeakerSilver.jpg">NYer42</a>, public domain
NY Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver. Photo: NYer42, public domain

Cuomo, Assembly Dems roll out reform ideas

At the New York State Capitol, lawmakers are scrambling to put forward plans responding to the recent twin corruption scandals involving bribery charges against a state Senator and Assemblyman.

Tuesday it was the Assembly Democrats' turn to weigh in, while Gov. Andrew Cuomo rolled out two more components of his own reform plan.  Go to full article
Move On, Occupy and other groups protest corruption in Albany outside Senate chamber with Hall of Shame of convicted or charged lawmakers. Photo: Karen DeWitt
Move On, Occupy and other groups protest corruption in Albany outside Senate chamber with Hall of Shame of convicted or charged lawmakers. Photo: Karen DeWitt

Lawmakers return to confront scandals

New York State lawmakers returned to work after a two week spring break. It's their first meeting since two lawmakers have been charged with bribery in corruption scandals.  Go to full article

Reform Group: Big campaign donations mean big tax loopholes

A group pressing for public campaign financing has compiled a list of large corporations who gave hundreds of thousands of dollars to some New York lawmakers. They charge that the donations are preventing the legislature from closing what they say are corporate tax loopholes.  Go to full article
Sen. Tkaczyk being sworn in on Jan. 24, 2013. Photo: www.nysenate.gov
Sen. Tkaczyk being sworn in on Jan. 24, 2013. Photo: www.nysenate.gov

Newest NY Senator says she'll fight for campaign finance reform

New York's newest Senator, Cecilia Tkaczyk, has been on the job for just over a week now, after a two and half month long court battle over absentee ballots resulted in a narrrow 18-vote win for her.

Tkaczyk, a sheep farmer, school board member and former legislative housing analyst, is a Democrat who won the newly drawn Senate seat in the Hudson and Mohawk Valleys that was designed for a Republican. Karen DeWitt spoke to Senator Tkaczyk during one of her first days on the job.  Go to full article

At the state capitol, things get testy over campaign finance reform

Democrats and Republicans in the State Senate are engaged in some good old-fashioned partisan squabbling over reform of the state's campaign finance system. In Albany, Karen DeWitt has more:  Go to full article
Former NY-20 Rep. Scott Murphy, member of NY Lead.
Former NY-20 Rep. Scott Murphy, member of NY Lead.

Bipartisan group says campaign finance reform good for democracy

A new bipartisan group is endorsing Governor Andrew Cuomo's call for a change in the way New York State politicians finance their campaigns. The group--NY Lead--includes some big names in business, like David Rockefeller and George Soros's son Jonathan Soros...and former elected officials from the democratic and republican parties.

NY Lead is pushing for a public financing system, which it says will encourage candidates to fund their campaigns by getting lots of small donations. It's also calling for lower limits on individual and business contributions.  Go to full article
This system right now is built for the big donor. Itís not built for the average donor.

Bipartisan groups looks to limit NY State campaign contributions

A new bipartisan coalition of former elected officials, and business and civic leaders, is endorsing Governor Andrew Cuomo's plan for campaign finance reform.

The group includes wealthy civic leaders including David Rockefeller, Jonathan Soros, the son of George Soros, and Frederick A.O. Schwartz, who is now with NYU's Brennan Center as well as former elected officials of both major parties. (Correction: the spokesman for the group is former North Country Congressman Scott Murphy, not Chris Murphy.)  Go to full article

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