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News stories tagged with "canning"

Winnie and Rob Sachno's root cellar in Pierrepont, NY. (photo: Paula Schechter)
Winnie and Rob Sachno's root cellar in Pierrepont, NY. (photo: Paula Schechter)

Heard Up North: more than roots in this cellar

Root cellars were an essential part of nearly every home a hundred years ago. And along with an increase in the number of people growing their own food is the return to the root cellar. More than a basement, it's the cousin to canning and freezing and another way of preserving the harvest into the winter months. A couple of winters ago, Todd Moe visited Winnie and Rob Sachno's root cellar on their St. Lawrence County farm for a closer look at a simpler way of storing food.  Go to full article
Flip Fillippi and Matt Kidwell seal a deal
Flip Fillippi and Matt Kidwell seal a deal

A canning swap to stock up for winter

The harvest seems like a long time ago. But lots of people are still savoring the fruits of the garden with a technique as old as their great-grandparents.

Canning and preserving fruits and vegetables is enjoying a revival, thanks to the burgeoning foodie and locavore movements.

A group of canners got together in Canton recently to barter and diversify their winter larder. As David Sommerstein reports, they make the old-fashioned...cool.  Go to full article
Cornell Cooperative Extension intern Cassandra Hamilton explains some of the finer points of canning.
Cornell Cooperative Extension intern Cassandra Hamilton explains some of the finer points of canning.

New and veteran canners bond and learn new tricks at Canton workshop

It might not have felt like it this week, but autumn is officially here--and winter is on its way. For many people saving some of summer's harvest by "putting up" fruits, vegetables, and sauces is an annual tradition. Others are looking to learn.

Canning has become popular among frugal people and foodies alike...and a mix of about a dozen canning veterans and amateurs came out to Coakley Ace hardware in Canton recently for a workshop put on by Cornell Cooperative Extension. No cooking went on, but a lot of recipes--and a lot of enthusiasm--were exchanged. Nora Flaherty has this story:  Go to full article
Flip Fillippi and Matt Kidwell seal a deal.
Flip Fillippi and Matt Kidwell seal a deal.

A canning swap to stock up for winter

The harvest seems like a long time ago. But lots of people are still savoring the fruits of the garden with a technique as old as their great-grandparents.

Canning and preserving fruits and vegetables is enjoying a revival, thanks to the burgeoning foodie and locavore movements.

A group of canners got together in Canton recently to barter and diversify their winter larder. As David Sommerstein reports, they make the old-fashioned...cool.  Go to full article
Late blight.
Late blight.

More bad news about late blight

Yesterday, Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy delivered more bad news about the tomato late blight that's devastated home and commercial tomato crops this year.

You can't can tomatoes that are showing signs of the disease.

Home-gardeners may be used to cutting out a bad spot or two when putting otherwise healthy tomatoes up for the winter. But late blight? Youve got to throw the whole tomato out. The trouble is, lots of people have already done some preserving and might be tempted to try to salvage the batch in question.

Martha Foley called Anne Lenox Barlow, horticulture educator with the Clinton and Essex County extension office. She just said, "No."  Go to full article

Still more late-blight news

Martha Foley and horticulturist Amy Ivy share more news on late-blight and tomatoes. Amy urges caution during the canning season.  Go to full article

Preserving the garden harvest

Martha Foley and horticulturist Amy Ivy talk about some ways to preserve vegetables from the garden - canning or freezing?  Go to full article

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