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News stories tagged with "cap-and-trade"

I think the public deserves to hear their elected officials talk about policy direction based on facts...

Carbon auction may be in trouble

A coalition of 10 Northeastern states can lay claim to the first pubic auction of "carbon credits" - essentially permits to pollute, mostly bought by big power producers.

But some of the coalition's members are having second thoughts. And the regional effort to curb global warming could be in trouble.

The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, or RGGI, auctioned its first credits in September 2008. It provided the "trade" part of "cap and trade." The marketplace was designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 10-percent by 2018.
Now, three of the original 10 states are considering withdrawing, in part because of the cost to electric ratepayers.

As part of a collaboration with Northeast stations, Amy Quinton with New Hampshire Public Radio reports.  Go to full article
John McHugh and George Pataki were architects of the national cap and trade system for fighting pollution. (File photos)
John McHugh and George Pataki were architects of the national cap and trade system for fighting pollution. (File photos)

GOP support for cap-and-trade erodes

In this year's mid-term elections, environmental issues have largely taken a back seat to jobs and the economy.

But here in the New York and across the Northeast, one trend is changing the political landscape and threatening to dismantle a model project aimed to fight climate change.

Many Republicans in the region once backed climate change legislation, and embraced a policy known as cap-and-trade to reduce greenhouse gases and other kinds of pollution

But a lot of Republican candidates in the Northeast are now campaigning aggressively against the cap-and-trade.

As Brian Mann reports, they're following the lead of conservative party leaders in other parts of the country.  Go to full article

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