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News stories tagged with "cape-vincent"

Virus Killing More Fish in Lake Ontario?

Thousands more dead fish are washing up on the shore of eastern Lake Ontario and the upper St. Lawrence River. Biologists and local businesses are concerned because many different species are being killed. As David Sommerstein reports, a new virus may be causing the die-off.  Go to full article

Virus Threatens River Muskies

Biologists are concerned a new fish virus may become an ongoing threat in the St. Lawrence River. DEC officials have confirmed Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia, or VHS, killed hundreds of round gobies, an invasive species, last month near Cape Vincent. The virus also killed 18 muskies, a prized native fish in the St. Lawrence. The DEC says it hasn't affected river trout or salmon populations so far. David Sommerstein spoke with John Farrell. Farrell directs SUNY ESF's Thousand Islands Biological Station near Clayton. He says the virus is common in Europe and Japan, and in saltwater in the Pacific Northwest. It first showed up in the Great Lakes watershed last year, in the Bay of Quinte in Lake Ontario.  Go to full article

Round Goby Die-Off May Be Viral

Environmental officials say a disease might be killing an invasive species of fish in eastern Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River. Tests have ruled out botulism. Scientists say the disease may be a virus. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Red-breasted Mergansers<br />dead of Type E Botulism on Lake Erie, 1999. Photo by I.K. Barker
Red-breasted Mergansers
dead of Type E Botulism on Lake Erie, 1999. Photo by I.K. Barker

Profs Troll for Botulism Cause

Two Clarkson University professors are trying to determine what causes a potentially fatal disease in birds and fish. Earlier this month, two dead seagulls in Cape Vincent tested positive for Type E Botulism. It was the first time the disease was identified on the St. Lawrence River. Botulism can harm humans who eat birds or fish poisoned with the toxin. David Sommerstein spoke with Tom Langen, a biology professor at Clarkson. He and colleague Michael Twiss are testing dead birds and fish on the St. Lawrence. Type E Botulism first showed up in the Great Lakes in 1998. Langen's hypothesis is that it's tied to invasive species like the round goby and zebra and quagga mussels.  Go to full article
Napolean and the Festival Queen in Cape Vincent.
Napolean and the Festival Queen in Cape Vincent.

A Cultural Melange at the French Festival

In the early 1600s, French Jesuit priests paddled hundreds of miles up the St. Lawrence River. They settled on the fertile land by the river's source at the eastern end of Lake Ontario. It's estimated a third of today's population in northern Jefferson County is descended from those French settlers. Last weekend, Cape Vincent held its 37th annual French Festival to celebrate that heritage. North Country Public Radio was also celebrating there. It was the grand opening of our new translator in Cape Vincent, reaching listeners at 93.9 FM. David Sommerstein was on hand and sends this audio postcard.  Go to full article
The "Phantom of the North", photo by Brian Sullivan
The "Phantom of the North", photo by Brian Sullivan

Great Gray Owl Glides Into NNY

The Great Gray Owl usually lives deep in the boreal forests of Canada. It's the official bird of the province of Manitoba. But due to scarce food and severe weather, thousands of the raptors have drifted south this year. They've invaded Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan, even southern Ontario and Quebec. But a Great Gray hadn't been spotted in New York State since 1996, according to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Until last Wednesday, that is, when ornithologist Gerry Smith spotted one in the farm fields between Clayton and Cape Vincent in Jefferson County. It so happened that David Sommerstein was there too and has the story.  Go to full article

Owl Invasion Affords Close-Up Observation

Great Gray Owl invasions, also called "irruptions", happen about once every ten years. But this one is the largest on record. Brian Sullivan is the project leader of the website, ebird.org, at the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology. Birders have posted Great Gray sightings from Minnesota to Montreal. Sullivan says it was only a matter of time until one was spotted in New York. Great Grays are one of the largest owls in North America, and they have a mysterious air about them. They're also known as the "Great Gray Ghost" and the "Phantom of the North". Sullivan told David Sommerstein despite those monikers, they're active during the day as well as night.  Go to full article

North Country Prisons to Lose 148 Jobs

The director of New York's state prisons says he'll move forward with a plan to cut the number of corrections officers. Commissioner Glenn Goord says nearly 150 jobs will be "down-sized" at three prisons in the north country. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

School Plans Tentative Amid Budget Battle

As the budget showdown in Albany reaches its climax, millions of dollars in education aid for North Country schools hang in the balance. School districts are making tentative plans for what they'd do with the extra money. As David Sommerstein reports, in most cases it's a mix of restoring cuts and lowering taxes.  Go to full article
The Fralick's 1832 stone house near Cape Vincent.
The Fralick's 1832 stone house near Cape Vincent.

Stone Building Group Collecting Opinions, Histories

Stone house owners in Jefferson county are collecting stories, histories and photos of the old buildings. Some say there may be more stone structures in Jefferson county than any other county in the U.S. Todd Moe toured an old stone house near Cape Vincent and chatted with owners Sandra and David Fralick, who are members of the Stone Building Appreciation Society. The group wants to update a listing of old stone buildings in the North Country. For more information about the Stone Building Appreciation Society call 315-782-1558.  Go to full article

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