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News stories tagged with "carr"

Resort developers Tom Lawson (L) and Michael Foxman (R) during yesterday's proceedings (Photos:  Brian Mann)
Resort developers Tom Lawson (L) and Michael Foxman (R) during yesterday's proceedings (Photos: Brian Mann)

Big Tupper developers win round in court, Nature Conservancy cries foul

Developers of a new resort in Tupper Lake won a major victory yesterday when a local jury awarded them road access to a 1200-acre parcel of land.

The decision will allow the Adirondack Club and Resort to maintain a short road easement across neighboring property owned by the Adirondack Nature Conservancy.

The company says they needed access in order to move their project forward. The green group says the developers wanted to take their private property rights.

Brian Mann was in Tupper Lake and has our story.  Go to full article
OK Slip Falls would be protected as part of the Finch deal (Photo: C. Heilman, courtesy of Nature Conservancy)
OK Slip Falls would be protected as part of the Finch deal (Photo: C. Heilman, courtesy of Nature Conservancy)

State DEC confirms that Finch, Pruyn deal "will have to wait"

State officials have confirmed that a plan to add more than sixty thousand acres of land to the Adirondack forest preserve is on hold until the state budget crisis has passed. The massive project, known as the Finch, Pruyn deal, was hailed by Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Pete Grannis when it was unveiled in 2007. The state's decision leaves the Adirondack Nature Conservancy holding more than $80 million of debt. Environmentalists were angered by this week's decision. But as Brian Mann reports, some critics are questioning whether the project should go forward at all.  Go to full article

Nature Conservancy plans layoffs

The Nature Conservancy is reportedly planning to lay off 10 percent of its staff worldwide as it deals with a struggling economy and a drop-off in donations. But, the impact on the organization's Adirondack chapter is still unknown. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

Huge Adirondack land deal completed in Clinton, Franklin Counties

New York state has purchased conservation easements on another huge swath of timberland in the northeastern Adirondacks. The $10.8 million deal was completed last week. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article
Mike Carr (at center in blue) of the Adirondack Nature Conservancy
Mike Carr (at center in blue) of the Adirondack Nature Conservancy

Big Adirondack land deals crash into NY economic crisis

As New York's fiscal crisis deepens, much of the debate in Albany has focused on schools and healthcare. But Governor David Paterson has also proposed using part of the Environmental Protection Fund, or EPF, to help close the budget gap. In the past, that money has been used to finance big conservation deals in the Adirondacks. Green groups want the state to buy tens of thousands of acres of forestland and add it to the Park's forest preserve. But as Brian Mann reports, a growing number of critics say land purchases should wait until New York's economy recovers.  Go to full article
Follensby Pond (Source: Adirondack Nature Conservancy
Follensby Pond (Source: Adirondack Nature Conservancy

With Follensby Pond deal, Adirondack environmentalists score prize

The Nature Conservancy announced yesterday that it has purchased another 14,000-acre parcel in the Adirondacks. The property, which lies on the outskirts of Tupper Lake, includes a pristine lake called Follensby Pond and more than ten miles of shoreline along the Raquette River. It is also the site of the fabled "Philosopher's Camp," visited by Ralph Waldo Emerson in the 1850s. The Conservancy will pay $16 million to the McCormick family, who live in Manchester, Vermont. As Brian Mann reports, green groups and outdoor recreation advocates have been chasing this deal for more than a decade.  Go to full article
Adrian Carr at the NCCCA in Plattsburgh. (photo: Luke Bush)
Adrian Carr at the NCCCA in Plattsburgh. (photo: Luke Bush)

Preview: Pianist Adrian Carr in Plattsburgh

Pianist and composer Adrian Carr hosts a concert of new music tonight and Saturday night (7 pm) at the North Country Cultural Center for the Arts in Plattsburgh. Carr is launching a new cd, Finding Charlotte. Adrian Carr grew up in Buffalo and attended the Juilliard School in New York City. But his life changed in 2003 during a hiking trip in the Adirondacks, and he now splits his time between Champlain and Montreal. Todd Moe spoke with him by phone about his music, career and the nagging question, "Who's Charlotte?"  Go to full article
Finch Pruyn deal changes Adirondack conservation map (Source: ANC)
Finch Pruyn deal changes Adirondack conservation map (Source: ANC)

In-depth: Finch, Pruyn deal affects communities, industry

The agreement last year that will preserve 161,000 acres of Finch Pruyn Paper company land is so large that it's reshaping the debate over conservation and economic development in the Adirondacks. The Adirondack Nature Conservancy engineered the $110 million purchase. Over the next four months, the green group will produce a management plan for the huge tract, which spreads over six counties and dozens of towns. The conservancy hopes to quickly sell much of the land and conservation easements to the state, at a price tag that could top $50 million. Other parcels will be sold for private development or to timber management companies. Brian Mann spoke at length about the project with the Adirondack Nature Conservancy's executive director, Mike Carr. Carr says there won't be a public process for the Finch, Pruyn project--no public hearings or formal comment period. But the Nature Conservancy is reaching out to as many local residents and officials as possible before next spring.  Go to full article
The Boreas Ponds are one of the gems of the Adk Nature Conservancy deal (Source: ANC)
The Boreas Ponds are one of the gems of the Adk Nature Conservancy deal (Source: ANC)

In-depth: Finch deal protects Adk lands, shifts debate

The Nature Conservancy deal with Finch, Pruyn, announced last summer, has drawn criticism and accolades. Local government leaders have questioned its impacts on communities, while green groups in the region heralded the acquisition as one of the biggest environmental coups of the last half-century. The architect of the project is Mike Carr, executive director of the Adirondack Nature Conservancy. Carr lives in Keene Valley and has deep family roots in the North Country. Overnight, the Finch, Pruyn deal made him into one of the most influential men in the region. The decisions he makes over the next few months will resonate far beyond conservation, affecting a half-dozen Adirondack communities, as well as local economies. Some of the 161,000 acres will go into the forest preserve, but other pieces will continue in timber production or be sold for private development. Mike Carr sat down recently to talk at length about his expanding role with Brian Mann. This is the first part of their conversation.  Go to full article

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