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News stories tagged with "cats"

Susan Willson and The Gorilla. Photo: Zach Hirsch
Susan Willson and The Gorilla. Photo: Zach Hirsch

Cat collar scholar: SLU biologist examines a new way to curb songbird mortality

Right now in the Canton-Potsdam area, there are about 50 people dressing their cats in technicolored, fluffy, Elizabethan collars. But they're not doing this because they think it's cute, or because they're making the next viral cat video.

The pets and their owners are part of a new study that has big implications for cats and their prey. Zach Hirsch has more.  Go to full article
<i>Tired Paws & Weary Wings</i>, paintings by Gwendolyn Best at Orange Gallery in Ottawa through June 9th.  Photo: Gwendolyn Best
Tired Paws & Weary Wings, paintings by Gwendolyn Best at Orange Gallery in Ottawa through June 9th. Photo: Gwendolyn Best

Remembering the Cats of Parliament Hill in art

An Ottawa artist has painted a series of works celebrating the Cats of Parliament Hill. Gwendolyn Best's cats are on display through June 9th at the Orange Gallery, in the Hintonburg neighborhood. The paintings were created to honor the many felines who made Parliament Hill their home. The sanctuary closed in early January when there were only four cats remaining in the colony. Those four joined the other dozen or so cats who over the years were adopted by volunteers.

The cats' ancestors arrived in the early 1900's to help control pests in nearby government buildings. The Canadian government and local volunteers had provided a place for them to take shelter and receive food and water since the 1970s. The cat sanctuary even had the Queen's blessing.

A couple of years ago, Todd Moe played tourist on Parliament Hill and met some of the cats and their caregivers. Brian Caines was one of the many volunteers who had visited the cats daily.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: How do cats purr?

As the secrets of the natural world give way to science, it's nice to know some mystery remains. Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley explore one of the last great conundrums: How do cats purr? Science has theories, but no definitive answer.  Go to full article
A cat nap in the shadow of Canada's Parliament.
A cat nap in the shadow of Canada's Parliament.

Prowling around Canada's Parliament Hill

Nestled amongst the trees along the western edge of Parliament Hill in Ottawa is a small spot reserved for the residential feral cat population. Their ancestors arrived in the early 1900's to help control pests in nearby government buildings. The Canadian government and local volunteers have provided a place for them to take shelter and receive food and water since the 1970's. This cat sanctuary even has the Queen's blessing.

Today, the complex includes neat rows of tiny kitty condos, built by cat lover Renee Chartrand. Renee, dubbed the "Cat Man of Ottawa", is 90 and still lives in the city, although he's not able to make the daily trek up Parliament Hill. A team of friends and volunteers have cheerfully taken up his cause. Todd Moe recently played tourist on Parliament Hill and met some of the cats and their caretakers.  Go to full article

Pet shelters feel the economic pinch

This year's economic downtown has had an impact on animal shelters in the region. They've seen a surge in numbers as stressed owners give up pets they can no longer afford to keep. The Potsdam Humane Society is planning to expand its current facility that was built back in the '50s. They're in the midst of a capital campaign and recently turned to the internet for a boost. Todd Moe talks with Linda Caamano, a Potsdam Humane Society board member.  Go to full article

Animal shelters weigh euthanasia, flood of cats and dogs

On Thursday, Brian Mann looked at the plight of tens of thousands of dogs, mostly pit bulls, exploited and killed every year by illegal dog fighting rings. Animal control experts say dog fighting is only one small front in a national pet crisis. Put simply, there are too many dogs and cats in America. Every single day, more than 11,000 unwanted pets are euthanized. Hundreds of thousands more live in horrific conditions. Today, in part two of a special project reported for National Public Radio, Brian Mann reports on the effort to reduce ease the pet overpopulation crisis.  Go to full article
Elisabeth Ward's book is available for $12: Shaggy Dog Press, PO Box 318, Westport, NY 12993.
Elisabeth Ward's book is available for $12: Shaggy Dog Press, PO Box 318, Westport, NY 12993.

New Book Celebrates Pets and Poetry

Elisabeth Ward is a Westport writer who's put together a collection of poems called Naked Weimaraner: The Dogs, The Cats, The Rest. It contains more than 25 poems about dogs, cats, goats, squirrels, foxes, and the rest. All the proceeds from the book are being donated to the North Country Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in Westport. Todd Moe spoke with Elisabeth Ward about her new book which explores the poetry of everyday life and the importance of living among animals.  Go to full article

SLU Celebrates "Blessing of the Animals"

Dozens of furry and finned critters and their human friends gathered in Canton for the annual "Blessing of the Animals" celebration at St. Lawrence University yesterday. Lots of dogs, a few cats, horses, and even fish mingled outside Gunnison Chapel. You might say it was doggie heaven. But for cats it was a little less divine - most stayed huddled in their pet carriers. As Todd Moe found out, the Blessing was an opportunity to reflect upon the positive impact animals have on our emotional and physical well-being. Wednesday's event included prayers, poems, stories and a tribute to St. Francis of Assisi, a 13th century monk noted for his hospitality to all creatures.  Go to full article

Canton Tackles Complaints about Cats

Canton has a cat problem. Maybe. Complaints of cats left loose to prowl neighbors' flower beds and stalk their birdfeeders lead earlier this year to consideration of ways to control cats - laws about licenses or leashes - like rules that govern dogs and their owners in the vllage. But results of a survey released this week suggest that cat control may not be a widespread concern after all. Martha Foley talks with Canton Mayor Robert Wells.  Go to full article

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