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News stories tagged with "cave"

This sign is going up at more caves around the U.S.
This sign is going up at more caves around the U.S.

Deadly bat disease threatens wildlife and a passionate caving community

White nose syndrome, the deadly bat disease, continues to spread across the eastern U.S. As more caves become infected, more questions are being asked about the sport of caving, or "spelunking." Federal scientists are urging cavers to stay out of caves and mines until more is known about how white-nose is spread. But many cavers say a ban on the sport is premature. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Exploring cave life

Curt Stager and Martha Foley do some imaginary spelunking and talk about the peculiar variations of animal life in caves.  Go to full article
A bat in Vermont's Aeolus Cave frozen in icicle (Source:  Brian Mann)
A bat in Vermont's Aeolus Cave frozen in icicle (Source: Brian Mann)

Scientists battling "white nose" bat disease prepare for worst

The mysterious ailment called "White-nose Syndrome" continues to decimate bat populations across the Northeast. A new outbreak was confirmed earlier this month in New Hampshire and the disease has spread as far as West Virginia. Scientists have begun collecting tissue from infected caves, here in the North Country and in Vermont, creating a genetic record of bat colonies that could vanish completely. As part of a collaboration with public radio stations across the Northeast, Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

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