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News stories tagged with "central-new-york"

West Side United Methodist Church in Syracuse is on the auction block. Photo: David Chanatry
West Side United Methodist Church in Syracuse is on the auction block. Photo: David Chanatry

After 140 years, a church closes its doors

This a bittersweet story, especially coming just as the Christmas draws near.

Another church has gone silent.

The West Side United Methodist Church in Syracuse has closed its doors, and last week the contents went to auction.  Go to full article
Abdullahi Majeni, Jeylani Semboga and Mganga Mbwera, help run a Somali-Bantu community group. Photo: Ryan Delaney<br />	<br />
Abdullahi Majeni, Jeylani Semboga and Mganga Mbwera, help run a Somali-Bantu community group. Photo: Ryan Delaney

Refugees pump life into post-industrial Utica

Utica has long seen itself as a city of immigrants. The arrival of Italians, Germans and Irish drove the city's population to peak at around 100,000. During the mid 1970's in the wake of major changes to the city's industrial base and dwindling employment opportunities, the population fell by nearly half.

"This city that we have now," said Joe Marino, a city councilor, "these new refugees really, really rebuilt the city."  Go to full article
The U.S. Salt plant, owned by Inergy. Salt is currently mined here, and the caverns from previous mining are where Inergy wants to store gas and LPG's (propane and butane.) Photo: David Chanatry
The U.S. Salt plant, owned by Inergy. Salt is currently mined here, and the caverns from previous mining are where Inergy wants to store gas and LPG's (propane and butane.) Photo: David Chanatry

Are the Finger Lakes the place to store natural gas?

It's something few people think about, but all the natural gas and other fossil fuels being produced by hydrofracking have to be stored somewhere before they get to the consumer. Often used for the job: underground salt caverns like the ones near Watkins Glen in the Finger Lakes.

Now an out-of-state company wants to expand storage there, a plan some local residents call risky.  Go to full article
Greta Oglesby (Caroline), Séamus Gailor (Noah Gellman).  Photo: T. Charles Erickson
Greta Oglesby (Caroline), Séamus Gailor (Noah Gellman). Photo: T. Charles Erickson

Theatre Review: "Caroline, or Change" at Syracuse Stage

The musical Caroline, or Change is running at Syracuse Stage through February 26. Resident theatre critic Connie Meng attended a recent performance and has this review.  Go to full article
We see far in the future. We have a long memory and we know about things— the earth...

Onondaga Nation applies traditional values to high tech investments

The Onondaga are among only a handful of Native American nations who refuse money from the US Federal Bureau of Indian Affairs. They do so to preserve their independence. They've also refused to open a casino.

But the Onondaga are reaching out--applying their traditional values and consensus-based decision-making--in a new series of business partnerships with clean tech companies. Emma Jacobs brings us this report from the Innovation Trail.

Support for the Innovation Trail comes from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. The Innovation Trail is a collaboration between five upstate public media outlets, reporting about New York's innovation economy.  Go to full article
The silver lining has been the dialogue the community is having... What are the decisions we want to make?

Tompkins County gets out front on hydrofracking

Tompkins County, headquartered in progressively-minded Ithaca, has a reputation for being opposed to hydrofracking. In fact, the town of Ithaca was among the first in the state to ban hydrofracking.

But Tompkins County is out front on getting ready for the reality of fracking. Officials are pushing lots of paper as the county gets set for the impacts on the local economy and infrastructure -- as well as the environment. Emma Jacobs reports for the Innovation Trail.  Go to full article
Linda Marie Larson (as Virginia), Alma Cuervo (as Ana), Gisela Chipe (as Matilde), David Adkins (as Charles), and Carol Halstead (as Lane) Photo: T. Charles Erickson
Linda Marie Larson (as Virginia), Alma Cuervo (as Ana), Gisela Chipe (as Matilde), David Adkins (as Charles), and Carol Halstead (as Lane) Photo: T. Charles Erickson

Theatre Review: "The Clean House" at Syracuse Stage

The Clean House is running at Syracuse Stage through May 22. Resident theatre critic Connie Meng was at the opening night and has this review.  Go to full article
It's amazing people don't realize that... it's kind of this little secret here in our own backyard.

Constellation Brands goes local

Pop quiz: Where's the headquarters of the world's largest wine company?
No, not Bordeaux. Not Napa, either.

Until last week, the correct answer would've been Victor, N.Y., just south of Rochester, and the company would've been Constellation Brands. But now the AP is reporting that E. & J. Gallo Winery of Modesto, Calif. holds that distinction.

That's after Constellation sold off the bulk of its money-losing Australian, British and South African holdings for $230 million.

Right as the evolving wine giant was pulling back abroad, The Innovation Trail's Zack Steward took a look at Constellation's growing place role in the local Finger Lakes wine economy.  Go to full article
Molly Brennen as the Red Queen, Lindsey Noel Whiting as Alice.  Photo: Ken Huth
Molly Brennen as the Red Queen, Lindsey Noel Whiting as Alice. Photo: Ken Huth

Theatre Review: "Lookingglass Alice" at Syracuse Stage

Lookingglass Alice runs at Syracuse Stage through March 14. Resident theatre critic Connie Meng was at the opening night and has this review.  Go to full article
Joseph Midyett as Picasso, Michael Tisdale as Freddy, Matt Harrington as Einstein. Photo: T. Charles Erickson.
Joseph Midyett as Picasso, Michael Tisdale as Freddy, Matt Harrington as Einstein. Photo: T. Charles Erickson.

Theatre Review: "Picasso at the Lapin Agile" at Syracuse Stage

Picasso at the Lapin Agile has opened the season at Syracuse Stage and runs through November 1. Resident theatre critic Connie Meng was at a recent performance and has this review.  Go to full article

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