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News stories tagged with "champion"

No Foul Play in Collapse of Bridge Near Santa Clara

The Department of Environmental Conservation has determined there was no criminal activity involved in the collapse of a bridge in the Champion lands in September. But, as Chris Knight reports, a criminal investigation continues to determine the cause of a fire that destroyed another nearby bridge the same day.  Go to full article

Arsonist Hits Adirondack Camps

Last month, an arsonist set fire to another historic hunting cabin owned by the Adirondack League Club in Old Forge. The Club owns more than fifty thousand acres in Hamilton and Herkimer Counties. The organization, with four hundred members, is seventh-largest landowner inside the blue line. Since 2000, six of their most remote cabins have burned mysteriously. The Club's general manager, Egan Willard, spoke with Brian Mann. He says there have been two attacks this year.

Anyone with information can call the state police in Herkimer at 315-866-7275. State police and the Department of Environmental Conservation are also investigating an unrelated case of possible arson in Franklin County, where two bridges were damaged on the former Champion timberlands.  Go to full article

DEC Truck Crashes on Vandalized Bridge in Disputed Champion Lands

State officials are investigating the vandalism of two bridges in the Champion Easement lands near Santa Clara in the northern Adirondacks. One of the bridges collapsed earlier this month, causing a state Environmental Conservation dump truck to roll into the St. Regis River. The driver of the truck wasn't injured. As Brian Mann reports, the Champion lands are still controversial, five years after the state signed one of the biggest conservation deals in New York's history.  Go to full article

APA & DEC To Discuss Champion Lands

The Adirondack Park Agency meets this morning in Ray Brook. As Brian Mann reports, commissioners and state DEC officials will talk about a recreation plan for Champion Easement lands.  Go to full article

Adirondack Hunting Camps: Traditional Use or Backcountry Condos?

For more than a century, hunters and fishermen in the Adirondacks have leased land for their cabins from big logging companies. But changes in the timber industry - and conservation deals made with the state - are displacing hundreds of hunting clubs. Now, more sportsmen are looking to buy their land, hoping to keep the tradition alive. As Brian Mann reports, the shift is raising new concerns about development in the backcountry.  Go to full article

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