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News stories tagged with "champlain-valley"

Jay town supervisor Randy Douglas is the first Democrat to lead Essex County in three decades (Source:  Town of Jay)
Jay town supervisor Randy Douglas is the first Democrat to lead Essex County in three decades (Source: Town of Jay)

In Essex County, Democrats make gains and history

Republicans are hoping to stage a revival in the Northeast this year, inspired by the upset victory of Senator Scott Brown in Massachusetts. But here in northern New York, Democrats continue to make surprising gains, eroding the GOP's decades-long dominance. Democrats Scott Murphy from Glens Falls and Bill Owens from Plattsburgh both won House seats in the last year. The party is also making inroads at the grassroots level, capturing local government offices. Brian Mann reports from Essex County.  Go to full article

Essex farmer Lewis wins another court fight against Adirondack Park Agency

Essex County farmer Salim "Sandy" Lewis won another round in court yesterday in his battle with the Adirondack Park Agency. According to the New York Times, a state judge has ordered the APA to pay all of Lewis's legal fees and expenses following a lengthy court fight. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article
Governor David Paterson was in Crown Point, as workers were still removing wreckage from the old Lake Champlain Bridge
Governor David Paterson was in Crown Point, as workers were still removing wreckage from the old Lake Champlain Bridge

Governor: Crown Point-Addison ferry to open on Sunday

Governor David Paterson was in the North Country yesterday, announcing that a new, temporary ferry will begin serving Crown Point and Addison Vermont as early as this weekend. The Lake Champlain bridge closed in mid-October after inspectors founds the concrete pilings were disintegrating. As Brian Mann reports, residents and business-owners in the Champlain Valley see the new ferry as another big step toward returning their lives to normal.  Go to full article

Does the town of Moriah have a future after the prison industry?

People plan to rally Thursday afternoon at 4:30 in Port Henry, at the Knights of Columbus Hall, in support of Moriah Shock. Governor David Paterson has slated the prison for closure as part of his statewide budget-cutting plan. Moriah town supervisor Tom Scozzafava says closing the camp will cripple his town's economy and end one of the most innovative programs in the state's prison system.  Go to full article

Story 2.0: A fresh start at Moriah Shock

Even many prison reform advocates, who want fewer New Yorkers sent to prison, say the state's so-called "shock" program offers alternatives that can benefit low-level, non-violent criminals. Inmates from Moriah Shock have long served useful roles in the region as well, helping forest rangers battle wild fires in the Adirondacks. Over the weekend, they were among the volunteers building the ice palace for Saranac Lake's Winter Carnival. A decade ago, Brian Mann spent a day behind bars at Moriah Shock, attending a graduation, talking with the inmates and their families.  Go to full article
After the explosion, the bridge's skeleton remained (Photos:  Mark Kurtz)
After the explosion, the bridge's skeleton remained (Photos: Mark Kurtz)

After eight decades, historic Crown Point bridge meets fiery end

The Crown Point bridge across Lake Champlain was demolished yesterday morning, just after ten o'clock. The span had served as a major link between Vermont and upstate New York for eight decades. It became a part of the North Country landscape and lore. Deterioration of the bridge and its closure in mid-October have crippled the Champlain Valley economy, straining ties between communities on both sides of the lake. As Brian Mann reports, many local people hope that yesterday's massive explosion marks a first step toward getting their lives back to normal.  Go to full article
Workers repair the cement supports of the Crown Point bridge (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Workers repair the cement supports of the Crown Point bridge (Photo: Brian Mann)

Lake Champlain bridge in worse shape than believed, fix could take years

One of the most important land crossings between Northern New York and Vermont is in worse shape than once believed. According to transportation officials from New York, some of the most important steel girders and cement pilings that support the Crown Point bridge are deteriorating rapidly. The route is used by more than 3,000 vehicles every day. About half of those cars and trucks are driven by people going to work. The bridge is also an important route for tourists. As Brian Mann reports, state and Federal agencies say replacing or permanently repairing the bridge could take half a decade.  Go to full article
The Forrence Family at their apple orchards in Peru (photo: TAUNY)
The Forrence Family at their apple orchards in Peru (photo: TAUNY)

A devotion to apples for generations

The Forrence Family Orchards, in Peru, NY, will be given an award by Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, this month. TAUNY will hand out its annual North Country Heritage Awards on Sunday, October 18th, in Canton. The Forrence family can trace its farming roots back to the early 1800s in the Champlain Valley. In the 1940s, the farm switched from producing milk to apples as its main crop. Today, it is owned and run by third and fourth generation Forrences, who use state-of-the-art technology to grow and harvest apples. But they still maintain many of the farm's original 18th century buildings. Todd Moe spoke with Mason Forrence about this year's apple harvest and a lifetime in the orchard.  Go to full article
The Depot Theatre in Westport NY
The Depot Theatre in Westport NY

Theatre Review: "Almost, Maine" at the Depot Theatre

Almost, Maine is running at the Depot Theatre in Westport through September 20. Resident theatre critic Connie Meng was at the opening night and has our review.  Go to full article

Feuds, lawsuits, criminal charges embroil Clinton County town of Peru

Small-town politics can be a tough business. Feuds over local taxes and skirmishes for control of village boards can be every bit as nasty as the political fights in Albany or Washington DC. But the rancor that has enveloped in the town of Peru, in Clinton County, is in a class by itself. For nearly four years, town supervisor Donald Covel has battled openly with members of his town board. There have been public shouting matches, a recall effort, and a flurry of costly lawsuits. Covel is now facing criminal charges of official misconduct and abuse of power. As Brian Mann reports, many locals say the rancor and bitterness have crippled their local government.  Go to full article

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