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News stories tagged with "chickens"

Cities and towns around the country have started allowing chickens and other agricultural activities in residential areas.<br />Photo: Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/11921146@N03/">Rachel Tayse</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Cities and towns around the country have started allowing chickens and other agricultural activities in residential areas.
Photo: Photo: Rachel Tayse, CC some rights reserved

Canton moves toward chickens, vegetable farms

The town of Canton is moving forward with zoning changes that would allow chickens and community gardens in residential areas. The Town Council decided Monday to draft two separate rules, one governing animals, and one for vegetable gardens.

Canton supervisor David Button says allowing chickens presents unique issues, so the town wants to address those specifically.  Go to full article
"Urban Chickens - An Open Forum" on Tuesday, April 12th, Plattsburgh City Hall, 7pm
"Urban Chickens - An Open Forum" on Tuesday, April 12th, Plattsburgh City Hall, 7pm

Plattsburgh forum on urban chickens

A group of Plattsburgh residents interested in keeping a limited number of backyard hens will hold a public forum next Tuesday night to the discuss the pros and cons of raising urban chickens. Some of their reasons for keeping chickens in the city include fresh eggs, a source of organic garden compost and gaining a closer relationship to the food they eat. It's illegal in the City of Plattsburgh to raise livestock, including chickens. But cities throughout the state, including Buffalo, Rochester, Saratoga Springs and New York City allow residents to raise chickens in their backyards. Todd Moe spoke with forum organizer Anne Lenox Barlow, who is an avid gardener and local food advocate.  Go to full article

City chicks: raising chickens a new trend among urban folks

A century ago - even just 60 years ago -- raising your own chickens wasn't unusual. Now, most of us get our eggs in cartons, and our chicken wings wrapped in plastic.

But there are a growing number of people nationwide who are reviving the art of chicken rearing. As part of a collaboration with Northeast stations, WNYC's Amy Eddings reports on backyard chicken farming in an unlikely place.  Go to full article
Linda Nellet brought a few of her birds to a backyard-chicken seminar in Chicago.
Linda Nellet brought a few of her birds to a backyard-chicken seminar in Chicago.

City chickens and urban eggs

Maybe it's easy to imagine chickens cooing and clucking on American farms, but how about in big-city backyards? Well, keeping chickens is legal in the nation's three largest cities, but in one of them, chicken-lovers nearly lost that right. Shawn Allee tells how some urban chicken-keepers were nearly caught off guard, and how they plan to keep their chickens in the coop.  Go to full article
3 baby chicks arrive at their new home.
3 baby chicks arrive at their new home.

Sound Portrait: "Chick Day" in Canton

It's another sure sign of spring in the North Country - the annual "Chick Day" at Wight & Patterson feed store in Canton. Todd Moe adopted 3 little peepers last Friday. He spoke with some of those, including David Nowell, who shepherded the 1,700 baby chicks to the store after they arrived at the post office.  Go to full article

Developing a New Test for West Nile Virus

Almost 6300 Americans contracted the West Nile virus this year. And 133 of them died. Each season, health officials scramble to predict where the virus will strike before it affects humans. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Karen Kelly reports on a experimental approach being used in Canada that might make that information faster and easier to collect.  Go to full article

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