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News stories tagged with "civil-war"

Lonel Woods and Julie Miller, faculty members at the Crane School of Music at SUNY Potsdam, will perform songs from the Civil War on Saturday night in Dekalb Junction.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Lonel Woods and Julie Miller, faculty members at the Crane School of Music at SUNY Potsdam, will perform songs from the Civil War on Saturday night in Dekalb Junction. Photo: Todd Moe

Remembering the canons, not cannons, of the Civil War

The music of the Civil War era is more than marches and bugle calls. Baritone Lonel Woods and pianist Julie Miller will perform songs from the Civil War at the Meeting House Museum in Dekalb Junction, south of Canton, Saturday night (7 pm).

Todd Moe caught up with Woods and Miller during a rehearsal this week to talk about the wide variety of songs written and performed on the battlefield and at home in the mid-1860's -- music that was popular in the north and the south. Woods says those songs ranged from hymns and spirituals to parlor songs and political propaganda.  Go to full article
One of Dennis Barr's photos from the 150th Civil War reenactment at Gettysburg.
One of Dennis Barr's photos from the 150th Civil War reenactment at Gettysburg.

Photo exhibit features Gettysburg's 150th, historic Canton

Canton photographer Dennis Barr spent time this summer at the 150th Civil War reenactment at Gettysburg. He took thousands of photos and is sharing some of them in an exhibit that opens tonight at 7 pm at Creative Spirit Gallery in Potsdam. The show also includes historic photos of Canton recently restored from glass plate negatives.  Go to full article
Betty Dochstader and Maria Hull are organizing a Civil War fashion show in Massena on Saturday.
Betty Dochstader and Maria Hull are organizing a Civil War fashion show in Massena on Saturday.

Serious about Civil War fashion: don't call them costumes

Civil War re-enactors from around the region will gather at Robert Moses State Park in Massena this weekend. But it isn't all cannons and uniforms. The many layers of a 19th century woman will be revealed as part of a fashion show on Saturday afternoon.

Todd Moe spoke with Maria Hull during last summer's annual Civil War Reenactment Weekend. She's a technology teacher in the Hudson Valley, who is also a Civil War re-enactor. Women's fashions from that era were all about making the waist appear small. Hull says hoop skirts, petticoats and full sleeves helped. She studied theater arts in college, makes her own Civil War era dresses and is an expert on women's fashions from the 1860s.  Go to full article
Harriet Tubman in the 1880s
Harriet Tubman in the 1880s

Remembering an Underground Railroad icon

Todd Moe talks with Syracuse University historian Milton Sernett, an expert on African American history. He'll give two talks in Canton on Thursday on Harriet Tubman, and the Underground Railroad in northern New York. Todd talks with him about how Tubman became the dominant symbol of the Underground Railroad and is still an inspiration today for many Americans.  Go to full article
Betty Dochstader and Maria Hull helped organize a Civil War fashion show in Massena.
Betty Dochstader and Maria Hull helped organize a Civil War fashion show in Massena.

Serious about Civil War fashions: don't call them costumes

Historic and re-enactment groups around the region are commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War this year. But it isn't all cannons and uniforms. The many layers of a 19th century woman were revealed as part of a fashion show in Massena recently.

Todd Moe talks with Maria Hull, a technology teacher in the Hudson Valley, who is also a Civil War re-enactor. Women's fashions from that era were all about making the waist appear small. Hull says hoop skirts, petticoats and full sleeves helped. She studied theater arts in college, makes her own Civil War era dresses and is an expert on women's fashions from the 1860s.  Go to full article

Preview: "Johnsburg Goes to War"

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War. Commemorative events are being held throughout the Northeast, including small towns. North Creek's Civil War weekend begins this Friday and will include lectures, historic photo displays and re-enactors in period uniforms. Todd Moe talks author and local historian Glenn Pearsall about the sacrifices Adirondack families made in the war. Pearsall says small towns, like North Creek and Johnsburg lost many of their young men in battle.  Go to full article
Martha Maine as Corporal Harrison (photo: Susan Mende)
Martha Maine as Corporal Harrison (photo: Susan Mende)

Secret warriors: women in the Civil War

Civil War buffs are commemorating the war's 150th anniversary this year. As part of an occasional series of conversations about the Civil War and its North Country connections, Todd Moe talks with a local re-enactor about women soldiers. Some women served as nurses, spies or camp cooks during the war, but others marched into battle. Forbidden from the military during the Civil War, hundreds of women disguised their gender by wearing uniforms and using masculine names. Canton Civil War re-enactor Martha Maine takes on the persona of her great grandfather, Harrison Carter Maine. She says patriotic, eager for adventure, or to accompany their husbands, hundreds of women assumed male identities to win the right to fight.

Maine speaks on "Women Soldiers in the Civil War" at a Brown Bag Lunch program at noon this Thursday at the St. Lawrence County Historical Association in Canton.  Go to full article

Book review: "March Toward the Thunder"

Many villages in the North Country have a statue or a plaque memorializing men who fought in the Civil War. Some of those soldiers were very young, and some of them were Native American. Betsy Kepes reviews Joseph Bruchec's novel for young adults, March Toward the Thunder, A Native American Perspective on the Civil War.  Go to full article
National Guard soldiers and Civil War reenactors bear the remains of a New York soldier (Photos:  Brian Mann)
National Guard soldiers and Civil War reenactors bear the remains of a New York soldier (Photos: Brian Mann)

A Civil War soldier lost at Antietam, returned to New York

Yesterday marked the 147th anniversary of the Civil War battle at Antietam in Maryland. It was the single bloodiest day in US history, with more than 20,000 men killed or wounded. Three hundred New Yorkers are still unaccounted for from that battle, their remains lost in the farm fields and the woods. But last summer, a hiker in an area known as the Corn Field discovered the remains of a soldier. His buttons and his belt identified him as a volunteer from New York. That soldier was finally laid to rest yesterday at Saratoga National Cemetery. In just a moment, we'll hear from the historian who arranged the long-delayed funeral. First, here's Brian Mann's audio portrait of the ceremony. It begins with the rumble of a motorcycle honor guard, which accompanied the soldier on his final journey from Maryland.  Go to full article
More than 20,000 men were killed or wounded at Antietam
More than 20,000 men were killed or wounded at Antietam

From a handful of remains, a soldier identified & a bitter day brought back to life

After yesterday's ceremony, Brian Mann spoke with Michael Aikey, head of the New York State Military Museum and Veteran Research Center. The Museum helped to organize yesterday's ceremony and also assisted with the forensic work after the soldier's remains were discovered last summer.  Go to full article

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