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News stories tagged with "clayton"

The <em>Robinson Bay</em> breaks Seaway ice back in 2001. NCPR file photo: Lisa Lazenby
The Robinson Bay breaks Seaway ice back in 2001. NCPR file photo: Lisa Lazenby

Shipping hampered by ice on St. Lawrence Seaway

CLAYTON, N.Y. (AP) Huge chunks of ice are causing problems on the Saint Lawrence Seaway even though the shipping season started two weeks ago.

Canadian Coast Guard ice cutters were trying to disperse ice clogging the shipping channel Tuesday as several ocean-bound cargo vessels waited to pass through.  Go to full article
"Lighthouse Rock Island" Rock Island Lighthouse, Thousand Islands, New York. Photo: Ted Van Pelt
"Lighthouse Rock Island" Rock Island Lighthouse, Thousand Islands, New York. Photo: Ted Van Pelt

Are the Thousand Islands scenic...enough?

The ice is out along much of the St. Lawrence River and the colors, sounds, and movement of Spring in the Thousand Islands region are on their way.

But here's a question: is the Thousand Islands--the fifty mile archipelago with its constellation of villages, castles, cottages, and parks--scenic enough? And what's more: is it significant? That's what around 60 people from the community gathered late last month to figure out.  Go to full article
The crew of Coast Guard Cutter <em>Neah Bay</em>, homeported in Cleveland, works to keep the <em>CSL Laurentien</em> moving during an escort in eastern Lake Erie March 27, 2014. Photo: courtesy USCG
The crew of Coast Guard Cutter Neah Bay, homeported in Cleveland, works to keep the CSL Laurentien moving during an escort in eastern Lake Erie March 27, 2014. Photo: courtesy USCG

Relentless winter's ice delays St. Lawrence River shipping

Three U.S. Coast Guard cutter vessels are to help with annual ice-breaking operations in Thunder Bay's harbour on Lake Superior--the far end of the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Canadian Coast Guard crews and their icebreakers are leading the effort after the harsh winter produced what are being called "unusually heavy and persistent" ice conditions.

The annual opening of the Seaway is one of the signs of spring in the North Country. But as with pretty much everything this year, winter is still having its way with the calendar.

The Seaway is holding its opening ceremony to welcome commercial ship traffic between the Great Lakes and the Atlantic Ocean this morning near Buffalo. But it's had to delay the opening of the St. Lawrence River part of the Seaway for three days until Monday due to ice.

David Sommerstein joined Martha Foley to discuss the annual debate over the Seaway's opening date.  Go to full article
Fortunately, Walldroff's Farm Equipment in Watertown had power on Christmas Eve. Santa's taking a tractor this year. Photo: Joanna Richards
Fortunately, Walldroff's Farm Equipment in Watertown had power on Christmas Eve. Santa's taking a tractor this year. Photo: Joanna Richards

Some celebrate dark, chilly Christmas Eve but it's not all bad

Utility crews worked down to the wire last night to try to get everyone's lights and heat back on by Christmas morning. Most of the 70,000 customers who lost power during the ice storm had it on again by yesterday evening. But a handful of residents celebrated a dark and chilly Christmas Eve.  Go to full article
The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein
The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein

North Country wines survive the cold, please the palate

The New York wine industry is booming. According to the New York Wine and Grape Foundation, five million people visit New York wineries every year. The industry generates almost $4 billion.

The North Country has almost two dozen wineries. The state legislature recently designated an Adirondack Wine Coast Trail to draw attention to a pocket of vineyards near Lake Champlain.

A lot of the credit for New York wines can go to a team of researchers that's doing what you might call "extreme winemaking" - breeding grapes that survive the North Country's frigid winters and still make delicious wine.

They hope names like Frontenac and Marquette will one day be as popular as Cabernet and Merlot. David Sommerstein reports from a vineyard in the Thousand Islands.  Go to full article
Jay Nash and friends will perform at the Clayton Opera House, Sunday, September 1, 7:30pm.   Tickets: 315-686-2200.
Jay Nash and friends will perform at the Clayton Opera House, Sunday, September 1, 7:30pm. Tickets: 315-686-2200.

Preview: 10th "Rock for the River" concert in Clayton

A second Rock for the River concert will be held this Sunday night in Clayton featuring Jay Nash and friends. A concert on the St. Lawrence River earlier this summer sold out within days, so Nash agreed to headline this special Labor Day weekend concert. Each year, Nash brings some of the best original song writers and musicians from across the country to the Clayton Opera House for an evening of live music in support of Save The River.

Jay Nash grew up in Syracuse and spent most summers playing guitar in the Thousand Islands, which he still considers home. His music took him to Los Angeles, but now he and his family live on a farm in Vermont and travel to the St. Lawrence each summer. Todd Moe caught up with Nash by phone to talk about Sunday night's Rock for the River reprise concert.  Go to full article
Clayton Distillery in the Thousand Islands is part of the locavore distillery trend -- it produces distilled products from locally grown grains and fruits. Photo courtesy <a href="http://claytondistillery.com/">Clayton Distillery</a>
Clayton Distillery in the Thousand Islands is part of the locavore distillery trend -- it produces distilled products from locally grown grains and fruits. Photo courtesy Clayton Distillery

Craft distilleries are the latest in the locavore trend

As people turn away from mass-produced products, demand is growing for locally produced food, wine and beer.

In upstate New York this trend is also reaching the field of craft distilleries, and the state is seeing a comeback of the small, artisan liquor operations of the pre-prohibition era.  Go to full article
The six commissioners of the International Joint Commission took testimony from more than two dozen people last night in Alexandria Bay. Photo: David Sommerstein.
The six commissioners of the International Joint Commission took testimony from more than two dozen people last night in Alexandria Bay. Photo: David Sommerstein.

River residents give water levels plan thumbs up

There were no surprises last night at a public hearing in Alexandria Bay about managing water levels on Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River. More than 150 area residents overwhelmingly supported a new plan that would restore wetlands, fish and wildlife, and lengthen the boating season.

The Jefferson and St. Lawrence county legislatures both support the plan. Assemblywoman Addie Russell spoke in favor, as did influential green group Save The River.

And there were no surprises the night before near Rochester, either, where residents of the south shore of Lake Ontario railed against the plan for the damage it could do to their property.

But as David Sommerstein reports, what emerged last night were personal stories that illustrate what's at stake, and the challenge the agency in charge of making the decision faces.  Go to full article
Save The River is sending telegrams like these - and a message that management of the St. Lawrence River is outdated - to Gov. Cuomo. [courtesy Save The River]
Save The River is sending telegrams like these - and a message that management of the St. Lawrence River is outdated - to Gov. Cuomo. [courtesy Save The River]

Save The River's throwback water levels strategy

A Thousand Islands based green group is using a 1950s era technology to protest a water levels plan from the same decade. Save The River is sending Governor Andrew Cuomo hundreds of telegrams urging him to change the way the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario are managed. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein
The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein

North Country wines survive the cold, please the palate

The New York wine industry is booming. According to the New York Wind and Grape Foundation, five million people visit New York wineries every year. The industry generates almost $4 billion.

The New York Farm Bureau is pushing for an official designation for a new Adirondack Wine Coast Trail to bring enthusiasts to seven vineyards in Clinton County.

A lot of the credit for New York wines can go to a team of researchers that's doing what you might call "extreme winemaking": Breeding grapes that survive the North Country's frigid winters and still make delicious wine.

They hope names like Frontenac and Marquette will one day be as popular as Cabernet and Merlot.  Go to full article

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