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News stories tagged with "clayton"

The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein
The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein

North Country wines survive the cold, please the palate

The New York wine industry is booming. According to the New York Wine and Grape Foundation, five million people visit New York wineries every year. The industry generates almost $4 billion.

The North Country has almost two dozen wineries. The state legislature recently designated an Adirondack Wine Coast Trail to draw attention to a pocket of vineyards near Lake Champlain.

A lot of the credit for New York wines can go to a team of researchers that's doing what you might call "extreme winemaking" - breeding grapes that survive the North Country's frigid winters and still make delicious wine.

They hope names like Frontenac and Marquette will one day be as popular as Cabernet and Merlot. David Sommerstein reports from a vineyard in the Thousand Islands.  Go to full article
Jay Nash and friends will perform at the Clayton Opera House, Sunday, September 1, 7:30pm.   Tickets: 315-686-2200.
Jay Nash and friends will perform at the Clayton Opera House, Sunday, September 1, 7:30pm. Tickets: 315-686-2200.

Preview: 10th "Rock for the River" concert in Clayton

A second Rock for the River concert will be held this Sunday night in Clayton featuring Jay Nash and friends. A concert on the St. Lawrence River earlier this summer sold out within days, so Nash agreed to headline this special Labor Day weekend concert. Each year, Nash brings some of the best original song writers and musicians from across the country to the Clayton Opera House for an evening of live music in support of Save The River.

Jay Nash grew up in Syracuse and spent most summers playing guitar in the Thousand Islands, which he still considers home. His music took him to Los Angeles, but now he and his family live on a farm in Vermont and travel to the St. Lawrence each summer. Todd Moe caught up with Nash by phone to talk about Sunday night's Rock for the River reprise concert.  Go to full article
Clayton Distillery in the Thousand Islands is part of the locavore distillery trend -- it produces distilled products from locally grown grains and fruits. Photo courtesy <a href="http://claytondistillery.com/">Clayton Distillery</a>
Clayton Distillery in the Thousand Islands is part of the locavore distillery trend -- it produces distilled products from locally grown grains and fruits. Photo courtesy Clayton Distillery

Craft distilleries are the latest in the locavore trend

As people turn away from mass-produced products, demand is growing for locally produced food, wine and beer.

In upstate New York this trend is also reaching the field of craft distilleries, and the state is seeing a comeback of the small, artisan liquor operations of the pre-prohibition era.  Go to full article
The six commissioners of the International Joint Commission took testimony from more than two dozen people last night in Alexandria Bay. Photo: David Sommerstein.
The six commissioners of the International Joint Commission took testimony from more than two dozen people last night in Alexandria Bay. Photo: David Sommerstein.

River residents give water levels plan thumbs up

There were no surprises last night at a public hearing in Alexandria Bay about managing water levels on Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River. More than 150 area residents overwhelmingly supported a new plan that would restore wetlands, fish and wildlife, and lengthen the boating season.

The Jefferson and St. Lawrence county legislatures both support the plan. Assemblywoman Addie Russell spoke in favor, as did influential green group Save The River.

And there were no surprises the night before near Rochester, either, where residents of the south shore of Lake Ontario railed against the plan for the damage it could do to their property.

But as David Sommerstein reports, what emerged last night were personal stories that illustrate what's at stake, and the challenge the agency in charge of making the decision faces.  Go to full article
Save The River is sending telegrams like these - and a message that management of the St. Lawrence River is outdated - to Gov. Cuomo. [courtesy Save The River]
Save The River is sending telegrams like these - and a message that management of the St. Lawrence River is outdated - to Gov. Cuomo. [courtesy Save The River]

Save The River's throwback water levels strategy

A Thousand Islands based green group is using a 1950s era technology to protest a water levels plan from the same decade. Save The River is sending Governor Andrew Cuomo hundreds of telegrams urging him to change the way the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario are managed. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein
The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein

North Country wines survive the cold, please the palate

The New York wine industry is booming. According to the New York Wind and Grape Foundation, five million people visit New York wineries every year. The industry generates almost $4 billion.

The New York Farm Bureau is pushing for an official designation for a new Adirondack Wine Coast Trail to bring enthusiasts to seven vineyards in Clinton County.

A lot of the credit for New York wines can go to a team of researchers that's doing what you might call "extreme winemaking": Breeding grapes that survive the North Country's frigid winters and still make delicious wine.

They hope names like Frontenac and Marquette will one day be as popular as Cabernet and Merlot.  Go to full article
David Dodge, the Antique Boat Museum's in-water fleet coordinator, pilots the swanky "Miss T.I.". Photo: David Sommerstein
David Dodge, the Antique Boat Museum's in-water fleet coordinator, pilots the swanky "Miss T.I.". Photo: David Sommerstein

Heard Up North: Gentleman's runabout in the Thousand Islands

Spring means life on St. Lawrence River in the Thousand Islands is coming back to life. One of the region's anchor destinations, the Antique Boat Museum in Clayton, opens for the season this weekend.

Fritz Hager is the museum's executive director. "We've got a lot going on here. We've got a lot of boats under restoration here," says Hager, "including our gigantic 110-foot houseboat, La Duchesse, which will be in restoration for a couple of years. So there's always a lot going on here boat-building wise. We also have boat rides, sailing classes, and other educational programs, and it all starts on Friday."  Go to full article
Maple Ridge wind farm near Lowville. Photo: David Sommerstein<br />
Maple Ridge wind farm near Lowville. Photo: David Sommerstein

Wind farms test New York's home rule tradition

A company that wants to erect 48 wind turbines in the town of Clayton recently announced it would seek permitting through the state's Article X, not the town council. Another company did the same thing in nearby Cape Vincent earlier this year.

Article X is a law passed last year. It gives a state board the authority to green light new power plants, including wind farms, possibly over local objections.  Go to full article
Jean Barberis and Ben Cohen test their paper skiff around the docks at the Antique Boat Museum in Clayton.
Jean Barberis and Ben Cohen test their paper skiff around the docks at the Antique Boat Museum in Clayton.

Down the St. Lawrence in a paper boat

Rowboats are a common sight on the St. Lawrence River, but a paper skiff is making its way through the Thousand Islands and down river to Montreal this week. The 17-foot boat was made by a group of New York City artists at the Antique Boat Museum in Clayton.

The urban artist/boat builders spent the last two weeks using the museum's collection and resources to build a new boat and learn more about the boating culture on the St. Lawrence. Their residency is a partnership with the museum's current exhibition of maritime-inspired art, called "Floating Through: Boats and Boating in Contemporary Art."

The artists are members of a Brooklyn collective called "Mare Liberum" and approach boat building in a non-traditional way: cheaply and quickly. With a little help from experts at the museum, they completed the boat in two weeks. But, a skiff made of paper? Could it really be rowed 168 miles past islands, through shipping channels and the St. Lawrence Seaway? Todd Moe stopped by the Antique Boat Museum late last week during the final stages of construction.  Go to full article
Jan McInnis
Jan McInnis

Comedy for Baby Boomers in Clayton

Family, kids, work and aging are all fair game at the Clayton Opera House tonight (7:30). Jan McInnis and Kent Rader will host an evening of Baby Boomer Comedy. The show advertises itself as a "clean, fun night." Both in their 50's, Jan says she and Kent cover all the topics common to their generation.

Todd Moe spoke with Jan McInnis, who began her career in the corporate world before turning to comedy. She's been a full time comedian for more than 16 years.  Go to full article

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