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News stories tagged with "clear-skies"

President Bush in Adirondacks 2002
President Bush in Adirondacks 2002

Clear Skies Plan Fails in Senate, Environmental Defeat For White House

The Bush Administration suffered a major defeat yesterday in the Senate. The Clear Skies initiative failed to pass a key committee vote, thanks in part to opposition from Vermont Senator Jim Jeffords and New York Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton. Clear Skies had been hailed by the power industry and by some pro-environment groups as a way to replace outdated pollution control laws. Opponents described the plan as a gift to coal-fired power plants in the Midwest that are blamed for much of the acid rain and Mercury pollution that hits the north country. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article
Photo © 2002 Adirondack Daily Enterprise, Michele Buck
Photo 2002 Adirondack Daily Enterprise, Michele Buck

Sorting Out Clear Skies

On Earth Day in 2002, President George Bush visited the Adirondacks to talk about acid rain - and introduce the plan he calls "Clear Skies". The President said his "clear skies" plan would revolutionize environmental law - ending acid rain, without crippling industry. Critics say the plan would allow heavy pollution to continue for decades. In this story from last year, Brian Mann sorts out how the "clear skies" plan would work:  Go to full article

McHugh On Clear Skies

Monday, the Environmental Protection Agency issued a formal rule to implement a crucial part of the clear skies plan - called new source review. New York, Vermont and 10 other states immediately sued to block the action, saying that only Congress can make such deep changes to such a bedrock law. Congressman John McHugh is co-sponsor of two bills that would address acid rain. He told Martha Foley he agrees with the states that it should be up to Congress to re-write the clean air rules, not the Bush administration.  Go to full article

Bush Administration Moves To Ease Clean Air Rules

The Bush Administration moved yesterday to ease rules designed to force power plants and factories to clean up their smokestacks. Nine east-coast states have filed suit to block the change. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article
President Bush visits Adirondacks<br />Photo:  Michele Buck, Adirondack Daily Enterprise
President Bush visits Adirondacks
Photo: Michele Buck, Adirondack Daily Enterprise

Bush?s Clean Air Plan Wins Cautious Optimism, Lawsuits & Distrust

Last week, the Bush Administration announced plans to relax key rules of the Clean Air Act, rules designed to clean up factories and power plants that contribute to acid rain. New York's attorney general immediately joined with other Northeastern states, filing a lawsuit to block the changes. Conservation groups support the lawsuit, but they disagree about President Bush's environmental agenda. Brian Mann has this report.  Go to full article

EPA Touts "Clear Skies"

The debate over how to clean America's air is heating up. In response to sharp criticisms, the Bush Administration is using computer projections to back up its "Clear Skies" proposal for curbing air pollution that causes acid rain in the Adirondacks. David Sommerstein reports many Democrats and environmentalists are backing a competing plan from Vermont Senator Jim Jeffords.  Go to full article

The Politics of Acid Rain: A new Proposal, A Bitter Fight Among Old Friends

For years, environmental groups have been pushing Congress to clean up the pollution that causes acid rain. In February, President Bush unveiled his own plan. The "clear skies" initiative has sparked a bitter debate among environmentalists. Some say the President wants serious reform. But critics say the plan is a sham that gives too much freedom to big factories and power plants. The issue has opened a rift in the way environmental groups see the Bush Administration. As Brian Mann reports, the opening may be enough for the President to move "clear skies" forward.  Go to full article

New Acid Rain Plan Draws Mixed Reviews

On Earth Day, President George Bush visited the Adirondacks to talk about acid rain. Each year, power plants and factories in the Midwest spit out tons of pollution. Clouds of sulfur and mercury drift across the north country, sterilizing lakes and killing forests. The President says his new "clear skies" plan would revolutionize environmental law - ending acid rain, without crippling industry. Critics say the plan would allow heavy pollution to continue for decades. In this second of a three-part series on acid rain, Brian Mann looks at how the "clear skies" plan would work.  Go to full article
Photo: Adirondack Daily Enterprise, Michele Buck
Photo: Adirondack Daily Enterprise, Michele Buck

President Visits Adirondacks for Earth Day

President George Bush is scheduled to arrive at Lake Clear Airport later this morning. He'll spend Earth Day in the Adirondacks, helping to rebuild a trail and talking about his plan to cut acid rain. As Brian Mann reports, the President will be met with excitement...and with protests.  Go to full article

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