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News stories tagged with "climate-change"

Eileen Simollardes (at right) from Vermont Gas outlines the pipeline project.  Cornwall select board chairman Bruce Hiland (in blue) looks on at left.  (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Eileen Simollardes (at right) from Vermont Gas outlines the pipeline project. Cornwall select board chairman Bruce Hiland (in blue) looks on at left. (Photo: Brian Mann)

NY-VT tension shapes Ticonderoga gas pipeline project

The US and Canada are carrying more and more energy produced in North America on rail tank cars. That's controversial, especially after this summer's disaster in Lac-Megantic.

But there's also a fierce debate underway over construction of new pipelines to carry the surge of domestic natural gas and oil. Much of the controversy has focused on the Keystone XL project in the Midwest. But we have our own pipeline battle shaping up here in the North Country.

A company in Vermont hopes to build a new line that would feed natural gas from Vermont underneath Lake Champlain to the International Paper mill in Ticonderoga. Some environmental activists and local government leaders in Vermont are promising to block the project unless major changes are made.  Go to full article

"Subversive gardening" on World Food Day

Today is World Food Day, a day to think about hunger and food insecurity around the world and in our backyard.

High school students from around the North Country are meeting at SUNY Potsdam today for a Food Day Youth Summit.

Keynote speaker Roger Doiron, founder and director of Kitchen Gardeners International, led the successful effort to get a kitchen garden planted at the White House.  Go to full article
Ellen Beberman's hillside market garden. Photo: Zach Hirsch
Ellen Beberman's hillside market garden. Photo: Zach Hirsch

Listen: Ellen Beberman on mountain gardening

Ellen Beberman is the manager of the farmers market in Tupper Lake, where she also sells her own produce. She grows her onions, leafy greens, carrots in perhaps the last place you'd expect to find a market garden. Beberman's land is on a steep slope in Vermontville, which poses special challenges for the grower.

Zach Hirsch caught up with her last week.  Go to full article
Limnologist Michael Twiss from Clarkson University. Photo: David Sommerstein.
Limnologist Michael Twiss from Clarkson University. Photo: David Sommerstein.

A mystery at the bottom of the Great Lakes food web

Phytoplankton - the algae that are food for plankton which in turn feed fish - are behaving strangely. They're surrounded by a nutrient they need to grow. But for some reason, they're not using it.

The puzzle has big implications for how scientists think about the Great Lakes' future in a warming world. David Sommerstein reports from the St. Lawrence River.  Go to full article
Kintigh Generating Station in Somerset, NY emitted almost 3.8 million tons of CO2 last year. Photo: <a href=" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Kintigh_Generating_Station_-_Somerset,_New_York.jpg"> Matthew D. Wilson</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Kintigh Generating Station in Somerset, NY emitted almost 3.8 million tons of CO2 last year. Photo: Matthew D. Wilson, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

America's dirtiest power plants: five are in New York

Environmental groups are renewing pressure on Governor Cuomo to make good on his commitment to reduce carbon pollution in the state. The Research and Policy Center of Environment New York is out with its list of America's Dirtiest Power Plants including the five worst in New York State.

Scientists call them the elephant in the room.  Go to full article
The fire hall in Ausable Forks was seriously damaged during tropical storm Irene two years ago. Photo: Brian Mann
The fire hall in Ausable Forks was seriously damaged during tropical storm Irene two years ago. Photo: Brian Mann

Cuomo talks storm readiness, avoids climate talk

Governor Andrew Cuomo was in the Adirondacks again yesterday. He visited Ausable Forks to talk about how New York communities can harden themselves to prepare for future storms and flooding.

Cuomo also offered funding to help communities develop their infrastructure, and he delivered $1.5 million in aid to help rebuild the Upper Jay fire hall, which was damaged during tropical storm Irene.

While Cuomo continues to talk about storm readiness, he also continues to raise questions about climate change - which many scientists believe is causing more extreme weather events.  Go to full article
Coal-fired turbines at Cayuga power plant in Lansing, NY. Photo: Teresa Peltier-WSKG
Coal-fired turbines at Cayuga power plant in Lansing, NY. Photo: Teresa Peltier-WSKG

How old coal-fired plants challenge NY's greener future

New York has some of the oldest coal-fired power plants in the country.
Their place in the state's changing energy landscape is still to be settled.

The state's Public Service Commission is considering the future of one of them, the Lansing plant on the shore of Cayuga Lake near Ithaca. The pending decision has sparked a debate that says a lot about the challenges New York will face if it's serious about switching to new sources of power.

Once every week, a freight train loaded with coal makes its way through Ithaca to the coal-fired power plant north of town, in Lansing, on the shore of Cayuga Lake. Those shipments may stop soon.  Go to full article
Turbines at the Marble River wind farm in Clinton, NY. Photo: Sarah Harris
Turbines at the Marble River wind farm in Clinton, NY. Photo: Sarah Harris

Wind company pulls out of Hammond

One of the world's largest wind power company is walking away from a project to build wind towers in the St. Lawrence County town of Hammond. Iberdrola of Spain says it's slowing down investment worldwide.

The plan generated bitter disputes in Hammond and several lawsuits to stop it.  Go to full article
A building in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood destroyed by Sandy. Photo<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/ccho/"> CCHO</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
A building in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood destroyed by Sandy. Photo CCHO, CC some rights reserved

Storm preparedness on Cuomo's SOS list

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says he intends to include recommendations from a disaster preparedness commission in his State of the State address next week.

Cuomo says he has both short-term and long-term preparedness in mind.  Go to full article
Michael Mann in the studio with NCPR News Director Martha Foley. Photo: Nora Flaherty
Michael Mann in the studio with NCPR News Director Martha Foley. Photo: Nora Flaherty

Nobel Prize-winning scientist Michael Mann talks climate change politics

The U.S. has just experienced one of the hottest, and most extreme summers of weather in its history. But climate change hasn't been much of an issue in this year's presidential race.

Michael Mann is a Nobel Prize-winning climate scientist at Pennsylvania State University. He's familiar with both the science and politics of climate change. And he's speaking this evening as part of St. Lawrence University's forum on the issue.

People who deny climate change - and want to prove that it's a fraud - have focused much of their effort on Mann. He joined Martha Foley in the studio to talk climate and politics.  Go to full article

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