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News stories tagged with "climate-change"

Water wanted for thirsty lands.
Water wanted for thirsty lands.

Global warming, growing thirst

Here in the North Country, we rarely think of drinking water as a commodity, as a resource as precious as oil or timber. But the growing demand for fresh water in other parts of the country -- especially in the desert Southwest -- is changing the value of water in places where supplies have always been plentiful. In this first report of our special coverage of climate change, global and local, Brian Mann looks at how this region's drinking water could wind up in faraway cities like Phoenix and Las Vegas.  Go to full article

Assessing Spitzer's energy policy

New wind farms in Clinton and Franklin counties will get state funding for generating renewable power for New York. Noble Environmental Power's wind turbines in the towns of Clinton, Ellenburg, Altona, and Chateaugay are among 21 renewable energy projects that will share $295 million under Governor Spitzer's energy policy. Spitzer unveiled the plan in a speech last week. He said it would also reduce state electricity usage by 15% by 2015. And it would also fast-track new power plants that emit low or no emissions, create jobs to retrofit buildings for energy conservation, and lower utility bills. Environmental and business groups, including National Grid, applauded the announcement. We turn to Ben Wiles for a closer look. He's a senior attorney with the Public Utility Law Project, which represents low income and rural residents on New York's energy issues. He told David Sommerstein Spitzer's proposal is a departure from the former Pataki Administration.  Go to full article
Step It Up activists on Whiteface Mountain (Photo:  Susan Bibeau/Adirondack Explorer)
Step It Up activists on Whiteface Mountain (Photo: Susan Bibeau/Adirondack Explorer)

On Whiteface, celebrating winter in a warming age

One of Bill McKibben's motivations for organizing the Step It Up event over the weekend was his love for winter. For thousands of people in the North Country, the season of snow and ice are an endangered experience. Brian Mann joined more than a dozen activists who skied up Whiteface Mountain's toll road to raise awareness of global climate change. He sent this audio postcard.  Go to full article

Step It Up skiiers offer advice for a warming planet

While on the summit of Whiteface Mountain, Brian Mann asked some of the skiers and activists to offer their thoughts on how global climate change might be confronted -- by governments and by individuals.  Go to full article
The SLU Step It Up photo
The SLU Step It Up photo

SLU 'steps it up'

Step It Up rallies were held in more than 1400 places around the country Saturday. All the events shared one thing in common. Participants took a group photo, which was then to be sent to Congress. David Sommerstein was at St. Lawrence University's student center when about 70 people gathered for the group shot. He sent this audio montage.  Go to full article

Inuit tell of warming Arctic

The Arctic is among the regions hit hardest by early climate change. Inuit artists from Nunavut, Labrador and other Arctic territories are eyewitnesses to warmer winters. They gather in Ottawa twice a year for meetings of the Inuit Art Foundation. Lucy Martin spent an afternoon with the artists last April. They told her their lives are already changing. Note: The Inuit Art Foundation artists return to Ottawa for their "Arts Alive" celebration this Saturday, April 21, from 10 to 4.  Go to full article
Brian Mann explores the fastest-growing region of the U.S.
Brian Mann explores the fastest-growing region of the U.S.

North Country water eyed by thirsty U.S.

Here in the North Country, we rarely think of drinking water as a commodity, as a resource as precious as oil or timber. But the growing demand for fresh water in other parts of the U.S. -- especially in the desert Southwest -- is changing the value of water in places where supplies have always been plentiful. In this special report, Brian Mann looks at how this region's drinking water could wind up in faraway cities like Phoenix and Las Vegas.  Go to full article

Reading into the warm winter

So what's going on with the weather anyway? Is it El Nino? Global warming? Martha Foley talks with Steve Robinson, who teaches about climate at St. Lawrence University to help us sort out the context and causes of our warm winter.  Go to full article

Bugs boom as climate busts

A new study suggests global warming could bring a boom in bug populations. The Environment Report's Rebecca Williams reports that could mean bumper crops of pests.  Go to full article
Sir Harold Kroto
Sir Harold Kroto

Nobel laureate voices energy concerns

Sir Harold Kroto is known to the scientific community for discovering a previously unknown form of carbon, called "buckminsterfullerene". It's been called a "buckyball", because it looks like a molecular soccer ball. Kroto was awarded the Nobel prize in chemistry for the discovery in 1996. But Kroto had a more generalist message when he spoke Monday at Clarkson University. He said scientists have to speak out about our energy consumption habits and their effect on the global environment. Kroto is a professor of chemistry at Florida State University. He told David Sommerstein that scientists can quantify the long-term effects of our energy addiction.  Go to full article

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