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News stories tagged with "climate-change"

The fire hall in Ausable Forks was seriously damaged during tropical storm Irene two years ago. Photo: Brian Mann
The fire hall in Ausable Forks was seriously damaged during tropical storm Irene two years ago. Photo: Brian Mann

Cuomo talks storm readiness, avoids climate talk

Governor Andrew Cuomo was in the Adirondacks again yesterday. He visited Ausable Forks to talk about how New York communities can harden themselves to prepare for future storms and flooding.

Cuomo also offered funding to help communities develop their infrastructure, and he delivered $1.5 million in aid to help rebuild the Upper Jay fire hall, which was damaged during tropical storm Irene.

While Cuomo continues to talk about storm readiness, he also continues to raise questions about climate change - which many scientists believe is causing more extreme weather events.  Go to full article
Coal-fired turbines at Cayuga power plant in Lansing, NY. Photo: Teresa Peltier-WSKG
Coal-fired turbines at Cayuga power plant in Lansing, NY. Photo: Teresa Peltier-WSKG

How old coal-fired plants challenge NY's greener future

New York has some of the oldest coal-fired power plants in the country.
Their place in the state's changing energy landscape is still to be settled.

The state's Public Service Commission is considering the future of one of them, the Lansing plant on the shore of Cayuga Lake near Ithaca. The pending decision has sparked a debate that says a lot about the challenges New York will face if it's serious about switching to new sources of power.

Once every week, a freight train loaded with coal makes its way through Ithaca to the coal-fired power plant north of town, in Lansing, on the shore of Cayuga Lake. Those shipments may stop soon.  Go to full article
Turbines at the Marble River wind farm in Clinton, NY. Photo: Sarah Harris
Turbines at the Marble River wind farm in Clinton, NY. Photo: Sarah Harris

Wind company pulls out of Hammond

One of the world's largest wind power company is walking away from a project to build wind towers in the St. Lawrence County town of Hammond. Iberdrola of Spain says it's slowing down investment worldwide.

The plan generated bitter disputes in Hammond and several lawsuits to stop it.  Go to full article
A building in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood destroyed by Sandy. Photo<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/ccho/"> CCHO</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
A building in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood destroyed by Sandy. Photo CCHO, CC some rights reserved

Storm preparedness on Cuomo's SOS list

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says he intends to include recommendations from a disaster preparedness commission in his State of the State address next week.

Cuomo says he has both short-term and long-term preparedness in mind.  Go to full article
Michael Mann in the studio with NCPR News Director Martha Foley. Photo: Nora Flaherty
Michael Mann in the studio with NCPR News Director Martha Foley. Photo: Nora Flaherty

Noted researcher Michael Mann on the science and politics of climate change

The U.S. has just experienced one of the hottest, and most extreme summers of weather in its history. But climate change hasn't been much of an issue in this year's presidential race.

Michael Mann is a climate scientist at Pennsylvania State University who contributed work to the the International Panel on Climate Change that received the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He's familiar with both the science and politics of climate change. And he's speaking this evening as part of St. Lawrence University's forum on the issue.

People who deny climate change - and want to prove that it's a fraud - have focused much of their effort on Mann. He joined Martha Foley in the studio to talk climate and politics.  Go to full article
Indian River Lakes Conservancy region (Source: IRLC website)
Indian River Lakes Conservancy region (Source: IRLC website)

Indian River Lakes Conservancy expands, builds bridge to Canada

On Friday, North Country Public Radio reported that some small land conservation deals are still moving forward in the Adirondack Park, despite the state's cash crunch. Groups outside the blue line are also working to protect key parcels of open space.

This spring, the Indian River Lakes Conservancy in the St. Lawrence Valley bought another parcel of wetlands and shorelines around Grass Lake, using a major grand from the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The group now owns more than 1500 acres.

As Brian Mann reports, the land could serve as part of a key wildlife corridor between the Adirondacks in New York and Algonquin Park in Canada.  Go to full article
Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager
Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager

Signs of Spring Call-in, weird weather edition

NCPR's Natural Selections team, Paul Smith's College naturalist Dr. Curt Stager and news director Martha Foley, talks with callers about the unusual weather this spring, what they have observed, and what it might mean for wildlife, crops, gardens and forests for the rest of the year.  Go to full article

Sour weather worries apple growers

While some North Country apple growers are worried sick about the weather - others say it's too soon to be concerned. After a week of temperatures in the 80s, apple trees started to bud. Julie Grant spoke yesterday with Patricia Sheehan, co-owner of Rulfs Orchard in Peru. Forecasters were predicting lows of around 15 degrees.

The forecast calls for better apple weather later this week, with highs near 50, and lows in the lower 30s.  Go to full article
Dr. Aileen O'Donoghue
Dr. Aileen O'Donoghue

Why it's warm, and more about the night sky

Physics professor Aileen O'Donoghue's visit to NCPR studios this morning was a two-fer. O'Donoghue teaches astronomy and climate at St. Lawrence University. So this morning, before talking about where the planets are in the night sky, and how the lovely new moon will rise this week, she explained how the scant snow this winter is contributing to the current hot spell.
She talked with Martha Foley.  Go to full article
Theres no part of the plan mandated to occur. (And) We have to consider cost when we consider item actions in it.

Climate action plan still on the table in St. Lawrence County

St. Lawrence County legislators are scheduled to take another look at a Climate Action Plan next week. When legislators asked the County Planning Department to write the plan last March, they wanted ways to save money by being more energy efficient.

The climate plan was tabled last summer, when students and professors at the four universities in Canton and Potsdam started a cost-benefit analysis of some ideas in the plan.  Go to full article

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