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News stories tagged with "clinton-county"

Smoke from an poorly controlled outdoor wood furnace. Photo: NYS DEC
Smoke from an poorly controlled outdoor wood furnace. Photo: NYS DEC

NY wants to help you buy a high efficiency wood furnace

Winter's still somewhat far off. But North Country residents who burn wood to heat their homes are already stacking cords for seasoning.

According to state figures, 3 percent of New Yorkers use wood as a primary source of heat, but that number jumps in the rural North Country. Fourteen percent of homes in St. Lawrence County use wood, 11 percent in Clinton County and 8 percent in Jefferson County.

Those numbers are higher than they used to be as more people have turned to wood as a renewable resource and to save money.

But older wood stoves and furnaces, even more recent outdoor wood boilers that have become very popular, are major sources of pollution, including tiny particles that are bad for the environment and people's lungs.  Go to full article

Troopers: Northern NY couple die in murder-suicide

ELLENBURG, N.Y. (AP) State police say autopsies are planned for a Clinton County couple after an apparent murder-suicide.

A concerned relative called troopers Saturday evening to check on the welfare of a resident of Ellenburg in northern Clinton County. Police found 44-year-old Pamela Williamson and 58-year-old Larry Williamson dead.  Go to full article
Rooftop solar panels in Poughkeepsie, NY. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_power_in_New_York#mediaviewer/File:Rooftop_Photovoltaic_Array.jpg">Lucas Braun</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Rooftop solar panels in Poughkeepsie, NY. Photo: Lucas Braun, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

California solar company eyes land at Plattsburgh Airport

Solar energy is on the rise in New York State, thanks in part to a company from California, and state incentives that make it more attractive to do business here. SolarCity already has plans for developing solar farms in Glens Falls, Queensbury, and Schenectady. The Plattsburgh International Airport may be next.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/dannyboymalinga/4876920844"/>Dan Davison</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Dan Davison, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

How do farmers feed the world in the 21st century?

By 2050, the planet will be supporting an estimated nine billion people. That number is from The Miner Institute, an agricultural research center in Chazy. Here's another: food production will have to rise 70 percent if all those people are to have enough to eat. But increased production won't be the only measure of success. All that food will have to be raised without degrading the environment.

Dr. John Bramley is a researcher and educator. He was president of the University of Vermont, as well as director of Vermont's agricultural experiment station. He'll talk about the challenges of feeding the world at the Miner Institute tonight. Martha Foley talked with Bramley this week.  Go to full article
Jessica Dulle. Photo: Strand Theatre
Jessica Dulle. Photo: Strand Theatre

Plattsburgh's Strand Theatre hires new director

The new director of the Strand Theatre and North Country Cultural Center for the Arts in Plattsburgh is in the first week of her new job overseeing final renovations and creation of the new Strand Center for the Arts.

Todd Moe talks with Jessica Dulle about her goals for the coming year, and new possibilities for the arts in Clinton, Franklin and Essex counties.  Go to full article
New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli. Photo: <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:New_York_State_Comptroller_Thomas_P._DiNapoli.jpg">Awhill34</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli. Photo: Awhill34, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Altona bookkeeper accused of stealing public money

State officials say a former town book-keeper in Altona in Clinton County embezzled $23,500 of taxpayer money. The alleged wrong-doing was found in an audit released yesterday by the New York State Comptroller's office.  Go to full article
43.7? Too cold. Amy says to wait for 50 degree (F) soil temperature before planting peas. Photo: <a href="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3646/3601931725_066a0fe319_o_d.jpg">Stephen Cochran</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
43.7? Too cold. Amy says to wait for 50 degree (F) soil temperature before planting peas. Photo: Stephen Cochran, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

When it's right to plant peas

The sun is out. The air is warm. It's late April. The crocuses are up and the daffodils aren't far behind. So, time to plant some peas, and maybe some lettuce, right?

Maybe, maybe not, says Cooperative Extension's Amy Ivy. She tells Martha Foley there's an easy way to tell, and it isn't the calendar. Stick a thermometer two inches down in the soil and see what it says. If it isn't 50 degrees down there, it's still too early.

They also talk about ways to warm things up a little and coddle those early season plantings. Amy explains row covers, and says even just protecting new seedlings from the wind can help.  Go to full article
Lenny Merculdi and Blake Putnam fill the "Bigfoot" with used plastics. Photo: David Sommerstein
Lenny Merculdi and Blake Putnam fill the "Bigfoot" with used plastics. Photo: David Sommerstein

Story 2.0: More farmers recycle ag plastics

Four years ago, state environmental officials made it illegal to burn trash and other waste anywhere in New York. That meant the end of the burn barrel, then a common sight across the countryside. Burn barrels were a major source of cancer-causing dioxin and other toxic chemicals in the air.

The burn ban also meant farmers could no longer burn the agricultural plastics that have become ubiquitous in farming. Trucking them to a landfill is the most common, but expensive, alternative. But more and more farmers are recycling them.

Our ongoing series, Story 2.0, checks back in on stories from the past.  Go to full article

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The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein
The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein

North Country wines survive the cold, please the palate

The New York wine industry is booming. According to the New York Wind and Grape Foundation, five million people visit New York wineries every year. The industry generates almost $4 billion.

The New York Farm Bureau is pushing for an official designation for a new Adirondack Wine Coast Trail to bring enthusiasts to seven vineyards in Clinton County.

A lot of the credit for New York wines can go to a team of researchers that's doing what you might call "extreme winemaking": Breeding grapes that survive the North Country's frigid winters and still make delicious wine.

They hope names like Frontenac and Marquette will one day be as popular as Cabernet and Merlot.  Go to full article

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