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News stories tagged with "clothing"

The Seaway Trail Discovery Center in Sackets Harbor
The Seaway Trail Discovery Center in Sackets Harbor

Recreating historic clothing, quilts by hand

Historical re-enactors will gather in Sackets Harbor this weekend as part of a War of 1812 bicentennial commemoration. But the conversations will focus on period clothing and quilts, rather than muskets and cannons. Todd Moe talks with Ted Schofield, a re-enactor from Chaumont, about his early 19th century reproduction sewing implements and a love of recreating historic clothing.  Go to full article
Shubel Clark's War of 1812 jacket at the Potsdam Museum.
Shubel Clark's War of 1812 jacket at the Potsdam Museum.

Heard Up North: An old coat is War of 1812 relic

The Potsdam Museum recently rediscovered an historic War of 1812 officer's uniform in its archives -- just in time for bicentennial commemorations. Museum officials say the dark blue and red wool uniform is in "very nice" condition for a 200-year old garment.

It's thought to have belonged to Shubel Clark, a soldier from Canton who was assigned to the New York Detached Militia in Ogdensburg. The heirloom was donated to the museum in 1953 by Clark's family.

Todd Moe stopped by for a closer look yesterday. The story behind the old coat is today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article
Betty Dochstader and Maria Hull helped organize a Civil War fashion show in Massena.
Betty Dochstader and Maria Hull helped organize a Civil War fashion show in Massena.

Serious about Civil War fashions: don't call them costumes

Historic and re-enactment groups around the region are commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War this year. But it isn't all cannons and uniforms. The many layers of a 19th century woman were revealed as part of a fashion show in Massena recently.

Todd Moe talks with Maria Hull, a technology teacher in the Hudson Valley, who is also a Civil War re-enactor. Women's fashions from that era were all about making the waist appear small. Hull says hoop skirts, petticoats and full sleeves helped. She studied theater arts in college, makes her own Civil War era dresses and is an expert on women's fashions from the 1860s.  Go to full article
Robert Pel makes and sells contemporary kilts
Robert Pel makes and sells contemporary kilts

Taking Kilts into the 21st century

Scottish emigrants ended up in nearly every corner of the world, so highland games featuring all things Scottish have also become widespread. A number of specialized vendors follow this busy summer circuit, bringing goods to throngs of their most likely customers. At this year's Glengarry Highland Games in Maxville, Ontario one such booth included a compact tailor's shop. Industrial sewing machines sat ready for serious stitching, with crisp fashion displays out front. And what was on the manikins? Kilts, of course. But not Great-granddad's scratchy plaids. Innovator Robert Pel told Lucy Martin the always-evolving garment is going mainstream.  Go to full article
Julia Ferreri's "clock" for the opera at Crane.
Julia Ferreri's "clock" for the opera at Crane.

Backstage at the opera: creativity and craftsmanship

Months before the opening night of any theatrical production, the drama starts backstage with the set, lighting and costume designs. Props, makeup and clothing are created by folks you won't see in front of the curtain, but by a crew of hidden artists.

For today's "Heard Up North," we step behind the scenes. Julia Ferreri is the costume shop manager at SUNY Potsdam. She's designing the costumes for next week's opera production of Ravel's The Child and the Enchanted Ones - the story of a rude child whose toys and furniture one day retaliate as they come to life. The designer draws inspiration from the story, the characters and the director. In between is a lot of common sense and creativity. And it's more of a challenge when the characters are chairs, a teacup or a grandfather clock.  Go to full article
Edwina Sutherland and some of her dolls.
Edwina Sutherland and some of her dolls.

Dressing the part for history

Clothing has always been a product of time and place. Thanks to various sources, experts know a lot about who wore what, and when. Information that comes in handy these days for plays, museums and re-enactment projects. The village of Manotick, Ontario marks its 150th anniversary this year. Events planned for the coming year will sometimes feature volunteers in period costumes. To help participants look the part, Edwina Sutherland, of Edwina Richards Studio, is presenting a lecture tomorrow on fashions of the mid-to-late 1800s, followed by a workshop on period dressing on February 7. She spoke with Ottawa correspondent Lucy Martin about clothing in centuries past, and the craft of sewing and replicating what people wore.  Go to full article

Assembly Considers Sales Tax Break on Clothing

The New York State Assembly, in its new budget, wants to reinstate a sales tax break on some clothing sold in the state. Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article

Dave Murray: Fitting the Well-Dressed 18th Century Gentleman

Todd Moe gets a fitting for a colonial-era waistcoat while visiting Morristown tailor Dave Murray, who specializes in 18th and early 19th century clothing.  Go to full article

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