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News stories tagged with "comics"

Sabrina Jones translates the history and statistics of America's era of mass incarceration into a graphic, sometimes claustrophobic story. Image: Sabrina Jones
Sabrina Jones translates the history and statistics of America's era of mass incarceration into a graphic, sometimes claustrophobic story. Image: Sabrina Jones

A graphic account of America's love affair with prisons

This year marks the 40th anniversary of New York's controversial Rockefeller drug laws -- laws that set tough mandatory prison sentences for drug dealers and addicts.

Many of those laws have been reformed and New York's inmate population has been shrinking dramatically.

But the aftershocks of New York's prison boom are still being felt, from urban neighborhoods in New York City to the North Country prison towns where thousands of inmates are still held behind bars.

We're exploring these issues with our year-long Prison Time Media Project.

In our latest installment, Brian Mann profiles Sabrina Jones, a political artist in Saratoga County who's using comic books to capture the complicated, painful history of America's era of mass incarceration.  Go to full article
Richie Rich was one of the characters that Couchey drew for Harvey Comics (Photos:  Brian Mann)
Richie Rich was one of the characters that Couchey drew for Harvey Comics (Photos: Brian Mann)

Sid Couchey wove the North Country into comic book history

Tonight at the Wadhams Library in Essex County, North Country comic book illustrator Sid Couchey will give a talk and answer questions about his life.

Couchey, who is 91 years old, was a so-called "factory artist" for decades. He drew characters like Richie Rich and Little Lotta for Harvey Comics.

When Brian Mann first profiled Couchey six years ago, he found that the artist often worked North Country scenes into his art.  Go to full article
French writer illustrator Charles Berberian
French writer illustrator Charles Berberian

Foreign comics find a path to American readers

Americans don't buy a lot of foreign novels, even in the summer when books are considered a beach accessory. But go to most bookstores these days and you'll find whole shelves devoted to international comics. From Japanese Manga to European art comics, graphic novels from overseas are pushing into the mainstream. Our reporter Brian Mann has been a comic collector for years. So he decided to find out why these foreign books are so popular.  Go to full article

Museum of Comic Art Opens in Ticonderoga

The Cartoon Museum of the Adirondacks has a new home. The museum had a grand opening earlier this month in Ticonderoga. Todd Moe talks with Stan Burdick, who says his museum houses hundreds of originals and prints of comics, cartoons and editorial art.  Go to full article

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