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News stories tagged with "common-core"

Common Core isn't working for everyone, including (according to her parents) six- year-old Maddie. Photo: courtesy of Jennifer Hansen
Common Core isn't working for everyone, including (according to her parents) six- year-old Maddie. Photo: courtesy of Jennifer Hansen

Common Core: looking for alternatives

Common Core is making its way into classrooms across New York state. The new standards and curriculum emphasize conceptual learning and critical thinking. But that approach doesn't work for all students.  Go to full article
5th grade math. Photo: Sarah Harris
5th grade math. Photo: Sarah Harris

Inside school: navigating Common Core

Common Core has become a lightning rod for dissatisfaction with educational policy. New York's Education Commissioner John King has been shouted down at public forums accompanying the roll out of the new federal standards in state schools this fall.

For teachers, Common Core isn't just a talking point. They have to find place for the new standards and recommended curriculum in their classrooms.
At Canton Central School, teachers are trying to figure out what Common Core means for them and their students.  Go to full article

"Day of Action" planned by NY teachers, union

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) Teachers across New York will wear blue and rally for more funding and less testing as part of a national "Day of Action" organized across numerous states.

Richard Iannuzzi, president of New York State United Teachers, says he's starting Monday at an event at Nyack High School with American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten, parents and legislators.

Events are also planned in Albany, Binghamton, Rochester, Syracuse, New York City, Yonkers, the Buffalo suburb of West Seneca, and at least two dozen other states.  Go to full article
At a forum on Common Core and standardized testing in Plattsburgh last week, a moderator asks all the parents in the audience to raise their hands. Photo: Sarah Harris
At a forum on Common Core and standardized testing in Plattsburgh last week, a moderator asks all the parents in the audience to raise their hands. Photo: Sarah Harris

Cuomo appears to distance himself from Common Core

Is Governor Cuomo backing away from his support for the new Common Core curriculum in schools? In recent days, Cuomo seems to have cooled from his initial endorsement of the rapid transition to the adoption of the national education standards.  Go to full article

Common Core explained

The new standards for students, known as Common Core, are changing education in New York. The first scores measuring where students stood were released earlier this year. Statewide, only about 30% of students in grades three through eight were considered proficient in English.

To find out more about the new standards and why the results were so low, Monica Sandreczki of WSKG spoke with Doctor Jon Supovitz, Director of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education at the University of Pennsylvania.  Go to full article
State Senator Betty Little (at right) helped organize the forum, which included Assemblyman Dan Stec (left), Board of Regents Chancellor Merryl Tisch, and state education Commissioner John King. Photo: Ian Lowe, high school senior at Schroon Lake Central School, used by permission
State Senator Betty Little (at right) helped organize the forum, which included Assemblyman Dan Stec (left), Board of Regents Chancellor Merryl Tisch, and state education Commissioner John King. Photo: Ian Lowe, high school senior at Schroon Lake Central School, used by permission

State ed officials face "common core" rage

State education commissioner John King and board of regents chair Merryl Tisch faced a barrage of criticism yesterday when they traveled to Schroon Lake in the Adirondacks to meet with parents and educators.

"It is challenging to raise standards. Any change process is challenging. But I am very optimistic because of what I see in classrooms," King said.

King argued that a national effort to raise public education standards was bound to hit road bumps and snags. But behind all the shouting and public debates and angry hearings in Albany, he insisted that students and teachers are adapting.  Go to full article
At a forum on Common Core and standardized testing in Plattsburgh last week, a moderator asks all the parents in the audience to raise their hands. Photo: Sarah Harris
At a forum on Common Core and standardized testing in Plattsburgh last week, a moderator asks all the parents in the audience to raise their hands. Photo: Sarah Harris

Student privacy a major concern

The state's Education Commissioner, John King, faced a bi-partisan grilling by liberal and conservative Assembly members at a hearing on growing concerns over student privacy.  Go to full article
Students in math class. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/8081867203/">woodleywonderworks</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved.
Students in math class. Photo: woodleywonderworks, Creative Commons, some rights reserved.

Why Common Core is having a rocky start

New York's hasty implementation of the Common Core curriculum has become a lightning rod for criticism statewide. Tomorrow state education commissioner John King is holding public meetings to address teachers' and parents' concerns in Schroon Lake and Plattsburgh.

Steve Todd has been visiting classrooms across St. Lawrence county to see firsthand the stumbles and successes of the new curriculum. Todd is assistant superintendent of instruction for St. Lawrence & Lewis BOCES.

He told David Sommerstein he's seen teachers and students alike "rolling up their sleeves" to get used to more rigorous classwork and more homework.  Go to full article
At a forum on Common Core and standardized testing in Plattsburgh last week, a moderator asks all the parents in the audience to raise their hands. Photo: Sarah Harris
At a forum on Common Core and standardized testing in Plattsburgh last week, a moderator asks all the parents in the audience to raise their hands. Photo: Sarah Harris

Poll: New Yorkers divided on Common Core

A new Siena College poll finds over half of New Yorkers think school children are taking too many tests. They're also uneasy about new standards known as the Common Core.  Go to full article
A moderator asks all the parents in the audience to raise their hands. Photo: Sarah Harris
A moderator asks all the parents in the audience to raise their hands. Photo: Sarah Harris

In Plattburgh, hundreds talk Common Core

Over 200 teachers, parents, students, and administrators gathered at SUNY Plattsburgh last night to talk about the new Common Core curriculum and testing in public school.

Assemblywoman Janet Duprey says a lot of her constituents are worried about the new curriculum.  Go to full article

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