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News stories tagged with "common-ground"

Assemblyman Dan Stec says the Adirondack Park's dialogue has "evolved."  Photo: Brian Mann
Assemblyman Dan Stec says the Adirondack Park's dialogue has "evolved." Photo: Brian Mann

In Adirondacks, maybe we really can get along

When the Adirondack Common Ground Alliance formed seven years ago, it seemed like a rare, small voice calling for a better dialogue.

Former Adirondack Park Agency chairman Ross Whaley once said that the political culture inside the blue line was so combative that people "would rather fight than win."

But even many skeptics now say the Common Ground Alliance -- which held their annual meeting Thursday in Newcomb -- has helped shift the conversation and even produced some tangible victories.  Go to full article
Local residents and seasonals debate the Park's future at a session this week in Long Lake (Photo:  Mark Kurtz)
Local residents and seasonals debate the Park's future at a session this week in Long Lake (Photo: Mark Kurtz)

Is new sustainable life vision for the Adirondack achievable?

Yesterday, we reported on a new planning effort in the Adirondacks, one that aims to find a common ground approach to environmental protection and economic development. The effort is attracting a broad coalition of groups and leaders who in the past have often been at odds. They've developed a concept for the Park's future that's being described as "the sustainable life."

Supporters hope that a richer balance of economic vitality and preservation will attract a new generation of young people and private investors. But as Brian Mann reports, big hurdles remain and for some small towns and villages, time may be running out.  Go to full article
Discussion groups with some of the Park's most influential leaders tackled the topics raised by Herman and Mason (Photos:  Mark Kurtz)
Discussion groups with some of the Park's most influential leaders tackled the topics raised by Herman and Mason (Photos: Mark Kurtz)

Can the Adirondacks offer residents a sustainable life?

The Adirondack Park is famous for its feuds and political controversies. From the Adirondack Club and Resort debate in Tupper Lake to the future of the railroad corridor through the Park, big and sometimes nasty fights often grab headlines.

But a growing coalition of Park leaders say they may have found a set of common principles that will allow more cooperation, while easing some of the tension between environmentalists, local government leaders and business owners. They've developed a concept called "the sustainable life" which would try to balance healthy towns with long term environmental protections.

As Brian Mann reports, the vision was unveiled at a meeting yesterday in Long Lake that was attended by more than 200 of the Park's most influential activists and leaders.  Go to full article
APA chairwoman Lani Ulrich. Photo: Brian Mann
APA chairwoman Lani Ulrich. Photo: Brian Mann

APA chair Ulrich says building "peace table" will bring progress in Adirondacks

Last month, Governor Andrew Cuomo named Lani Ulrich from Old Forge to head the Adirondack Park Agency. She replaces Curt Stiles, who stepped down over the summer. Ulrich has served on the APA commission for seven years and also spearheaded the formation of a new group called the Common Ground Alliance, that has worked to defuse some of the Park's most controversial debates.

She sat down Wednesday with Brian Mann for her first in-depth interview since taking over as chair. Because of legal restrictions, Ulrich declined to answer questions about the Adirondack Club and Resort project now under review by the Agency. But she says it is time to think big about how the regulatory agency can tackle big issues that face Park communities and the environment.  Go to full article
Brian Mann's article appears in the October issue of <em>Adirondack Life</em>
Brian Mann's article appears in the October issue of Adirondack Life

Talking about the future of Adirondack Park towns

This evening in Lake Placid, Adirondack Life magazine will hold a public discussion on the future of communities in the Park. Tonight's conversation follows a meeting yesterday of the Adirondack North Country Association where economists gave their best estimates of where the region's economy is headed.

There has also been a new discussion prompted a group called the Common Ground Alliance, aimed at finding a shared vision for what healthy Adirondack towns and villages might look like. Brian Mann wrote about this conversation in the latest issue of Adirondack Life magazine and he'll be at tonight's round-table.

Martha Foley asked him why this conversation is happening with such intensity now.  Go to full article
The Adirondack Common Ground Alliance meeting was held yesterday in Long Lake (Photo:  Common Ground Alliance website)
The Adirondack Common Ground Alliance meeting was held yesterday in Long Lake (Photo: Common Ground Alliance website)

In the search for common ground, Adirondack groups take small steps

Yesterday in Long Lake some of the Adirondack Park's most partisan groups and activists gathered for a meeting of the Common Ground Alliance.

Over the last four years, the Alliance has been trying to build bridges and find issues that all the Park's factions - from local government leaders to environmentalists - can support.

As Brian Mann reports, even some of the project's organizers say tangible results have been hard to come by.  Go to full article

NC coalition hopes to kill cap on state tax payments

More than 150 local leaders from across the North Country are urging the state legislature to reject a cap on property tax payments in the Adirondack Park. Governor Paterson wants to cap tax payments to communities in the Park at the 2008 level -- about $70 million. Martha Foley spoke with Adirondack Bureau Chief Brian Mann this morning.  Go to full article

Paterson budget plan still targets tax payments to Adirondacks

Governor David Paterson issued his thirty day budget amendments yesterday. A coalition of Adirondack leaders had been pushing for the Governor to drop plans to cap property taxes on state land inside the blue line. But as Brian Mann reports, state officials seem committed to the idea of cutting payments to Park communities.  Go to full article

Adirondack group wants to bridge divides in Park

We heard yesterday about the debate over floatplanes in the Adirondack Park. Disagreement over tourist flights to Lows Lake has triggered a new round of finger-pointing and accusations. A group called the Adirondacks' Common Ground Alliance is hoping to ease some of the tensions inside the blue line. The Alliance has been trying to identify issues that all sides can agree on, including green groups, local leaders, and state officials. Jacob Resneck attended a meeting this week at Paul Smiths and has our story.  Go to full article

Cooperation, common ground sought in Long Lake

More than 160 people, from government officials to special interest groups from all spectrums, gathered in Long Lake yesterday. They set aside their differences to talk about the challenges that Adirondack communities are facing and to look for common ground. It was the second annual meeting of the Common Ground Alliance, a group that hopes to find opportunities to replace conflict with cooperation. Jacob Resneck reports.  Go to full article

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