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News stories tagged with "community"

Louise Gava, Coordinator of Sustainability Projects at St. Lawrence University, talks strategy with SLU ReUse employees and volunteers. Photo: Zach Hirsch
Louise Gava, Coordinator of Sustainability Projects at St. Lawrence University, talks strategy with SLU ReUse employees and volunteers. Photo: Zach Hirsch

SLU crew rescues graduation goodies

It's graduation season, and all over the country there's a mass exodus out of the dorms. Students often leave a lot of stuff behind - things like futons, lamps, TVs, and other items that are difficult to pack.

At St. Lawrence University, one group is trying to rescue those items before they get tossed in the dumpster. SLU ReUse salvages, donates, and resells students' leftovers. They've even opened a small thrift store on campus.

Zach Hirsch tagged along with the SLU ReUse team on the big senior move-out day, and he produced this audio postcard.  Go to full article
Third generation co-owner Peter Depthereos in front of The Crystal. Photo courtesy of TAUNY
Third generation co-owner Peter Depthereos in front of The Crystal. Photo courtesy of TAUNY

Watertown's oldest restaurant faces eviction deadline

Last week, the North Country learned that one of its iconic places to eat has been served an eviction notice. The Crystal, Watertown's oldest restaurant, opened its doors more than 90 years ago, and since the '40s, it's been run by the Dephtereos family.  Go to full article
Canton resident Betty Peckham at the Unitarian Universalist Church, where students are cleaning up after the weekly Campus Kitchens dinner. Photo: Zach Hirsch
Canton resident Betty Peckham at the Unitarian Universalist Church, where students are cleaning up after the weekly Campus Kitchens dinner. Photo: Zach Hirsch

Campus Kitchens: free food and companionship in Canton

Campus Kitchens is a nation-wide program, run by college students, that feeds the needy. In Canton, St. Lawrence University students started their own branch a few years ago.

Every Monday, volunteers cook a meal and serve it for free. But people don't just come for the food.  Go to full article
Montreal artist Aquil Virani (in gray) chats over a collection of doodles with a group of new students at Paul Smiths College.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Montreal artist Aquil Virani (in gray) chats over a collection of doodles with a group of new students at Paul Smiths College. Photo: Todd Moe

Aquil Virani: revealing the artist in everyone

New artwork created during Welcome Week at Paul Smiths College will be unveiled this afternoon. A Canadian visual artist worked with first year Paul Smiths students over the weekend on a community art project.

The idea sounds simple enough -- hand out slips of paper to students and ask them to create a doodle that will added to a larger triptych. But, what about those who say they can't draw? Todd Moe talks with Montreal artist and graphic designer Aquil Virani about revealing the artist in everyone and how art can bring people together.  Go to full article
Sharon Bastille ("Mom") presents a pie. Photo: Nora Flaherty
Sharon Bastille ("Mom") presents a pie. Photo: Nora Flaherty

Mom's Schoolhouse Diner closes after a decade in West Potsdam

For the last ten years, Sharon Bastille - better known as "Mom" - and her husband Dick have been running Mom's Schoolhouse Diner in West Potsdam. But the Mom's era will come to an end this weekend, as the diner shuts its doors after Saturday, August 17.  Go to full article
Sharon Bastille ("Mom") presents a pie. Photo: Nora Flaherty
Sharon Bastille ("Mom") presents a pie. Photo: Nora Flaherty

Serving up meatloaf, pie and community at Mom's Schoolhouse Diner

At its best, Thanksgiving is about food, family, and community--and Sharon Bastille, better known around her West Potsdam stomping ground as "Mom", has built her business around all those things.

Bastille and her husband, who's a carpenter, own Mom's Schoolhouse Diner, located in a former one-room schoolhouse. Mom's is a '50s diner, where the staff wears red and white checked circle skirts under their aprons.

Bastille has had Mom's for about a decade, after a couple decades spent at home with her kids. She tries to make the diner as much like home as possible by knowing customers' names, likes and dislikes, for example. Though Mom's is a business, Bastille doesn't think of herself as a businesswoman. She told Nora Flaherty she doesn't make a living from the diner. But as long as it breaks even, her priority is creating a nice place for people in the community to come together.  Go to full article
Gail and Bob Simmons are among the year-round and seasonal Wanakenans profiled in Kristin Rehder's photo exhibition, <i>The Way to Wanakena</i>, at the Ranger School through September 30th.
Gail and Bob Simmons are among the year-round and seasonal Wanakenans profiled in Kristin Rehder's photo exhibition, The Way to Wanakena, at the Ranger School through September 30th.

Photographer captures Wanakena's community spirit

Using images and text, a new photography exhibit explores the meaning of community and small town life in the northern Adirondacks. The Way to Wanakena is the thesis project of seasonal resident Kristin Rehder, a graduate student at Skidmore College. Her photos are on display at the Ranger School through September 30th.

Rehder told Todd Moe that she's a writer by profession who is also a "passionate photographer" who uses the camera to help her "learn something about the world." Her exhibit is in the tradition of social-activist photography. Rehder says she fell in love with Wanakena during her first visit eleven years ago.  Go to full article

Preview: Harvest Social at SUNY Potsdam

Music, socializing and food will be part of Gardenshare's Harvest Social this Thursday night (7pm) at SUNY Potsdam. The event is free and open to everyone. GardenShare is a nonprofit organization seeking to end hunger and strengthen food security in northern New York. The group will also present its nine annual Growing Community Award. Todd Moe spoke with Phil Harnden, Executive Director of GardenShare, about Thursday's event.  Go to full article
There doesn't seem to be as many babies. Our baby is pretty much standing alone right now. When I grew up...there was a ton of kids...

As Hamilton County ages, will communities hang on?

Last week, the US Census found that the New York population is aging much faster than the rest of New York state. The average resident in St. Lawrence County is forty years old. The number of young children in the county, below age five, dropped ten percent over the last decade.

In Hamilton County, the median age is even higher - more than 51 years old. That's thirteen years older, on average, than New York state as a whole. Brian Mann was in Hamilton County last week talking to people about the Census findings and what these numbers mean for their communities. He talks with Martha Foley.  Go to full article
Keegan Muldowney (left) waits for his turn on a vehicle fire drill held last summer in Keeseville (Photo courtesy of Saranac Lake Volunteer Fire Department)
Keegan Muldowney (left) waits for his turn on a vehicle fire drill held last summer in Keeseville (Photo courtesy of Saranac Lake Volunteer Fire Department)

Volunteer fire squads battle blazes and a shortage of recruits

Across the North Country, volunteer fire squads are struggling to find new recruits.

Departments face a lot of challenges. Many small towns have fewer and fewer young people.

Training demands have grown over the years.

As Chris Morris reports, the region's fire chiefs are organizing to try to rebuild the tradition of service.  Go to full article

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