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News stories tagged with "compost"

This can be a good time to work a little extra compost into the garden to enrich soil exhausted by the growing season. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/bethness/10544820835/">beth h</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
This can be a good time to work a little extra compost into the garden to enrich soil exhausted by the growing season. Photo: beth h, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Giving the flower beds a boost this fall

It seems like there's always a list of garden chores. It's peak harvest season for vegetables, but if you're a flower enthusiast horticulturist Amy Ivy has some tips on applying compost to the perennial beds this season.

Spring is a busy time in the garden, so Todd Moe spoke with Amy Ivy about using compost this fall to reinvigorate the soil, and maybe consider dividing and rearranging some plants to give the garden a new, healthier look next spring.  Go to full article
A bird's nest compost bin. Photo: Tompkins County Cooperative
A bird's nest compost bin. Photo: Tompkins County Cooperative

Kitchen compost: a gift for the garden

Compost is a key ingredient to increasing the organic matter in garden soil. And now is a great time to add it as a layer in the garden to help nourish seeds and seedlings.

Amy Ivy, horticulturist for Cornell Cooperative in Clinton and Essex Counties, explains some of the best ways to use compost in your garden, and alternatives if you don't have your own.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/cafemama/3554624390/in/photolist-6q7nZq-9bWxWy-4FjXbD-48C15n-4B7ks-d33Bcu-4B1fJL-84PDiw-hos2oJ-kmJZQ-Po95f-9kkqg2-hovRDL-ahtbyB-ieJUqN-adLfQb-9Ak9XY-6vikT9-JVDMJ-dAKsT8-83YQcJ-6tNG25-6bCcDi-eh96Pz-6fGSZF-db5C2U-db5BxQ-db5BMC-NxEpj-a4sQ2N-8o4Pya-6f6qui-7PKvEd-4WbwDb-6KeovC-5ek7mn-4X8zQM-2kaEaN-5fgsDp-6jCjBC-7YiN6B-8sZy9F-d33BaN-d33Be9-dWehH-89JiNr-avWqyt-9LbTLM-81LwZ9-4LAwRo">Sarah Gilbert</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Sarah Gilbert, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Gardening call in gleanings: potato scab, blueberry canes, green manure

Horticulturist Amy Ivy and Martha Foley takes up some odds and ends of questions listeners had during our Spring Gardening Call-in program. Issues covered include scab on beets and potatoes, care of blueberry canes, and what you can use in place of compost if you can't get hold of it.  Go to full article
These leaves are lovely on the tree, and a valuable resource for gardeners once they're on the ground. Photo: Brian Mann
These leaves are lovely on the tree, and a valuable resource for gardeners once they're on the ground. Photo: Brian Mann

Leaf compost is garden gold

Trying to figure out how to cope with all those leaves? Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy says to add them to your compost pile. Next year you'll want to put all that nutrition back into your garden plot and plant beds.  Go to full article
Image: Lasagnagardening.com
Image: Lasagnagardening.com

The Weekly Gardening Conversation: Lasagna Gardening

Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulturalist Amy Ivy talks with Martha Foley about "lasagna gardening," which (disappointingly) isn't about pasta at all, but rather about layering organic materials, like compost, newspaper, peat moss, etc., on your gardening spot to create a healthier plot come spring. But can it work for home gardeners in the North Country?  Go to full article
These leaves are lovely on the tree, and a valuable resource for gardeners once they're on the ground. Photo: Brian Mann
These leaves are lovely on the tree, and a valuable resource for gardeners once they're on the ground. Photo: Brian Mann

Many reasons to cherish the fallen leaves

This year's brilliant fall color display is fast giving way to the second annual leaf event: Raking season.

Few people will say raking is their favorite outdoor chore. But in their weekly conversation, Amy Ivy tells Martha Foley there are plenty of reasons to cherish those fallen leaves, and more than one way to deal with them.  Go to full article

Dealing with garden leftovers

With the growing season winding down, some gardeners have already begun garden cleanup chores. Horticulturist Amy Ivy has some tips on composting and ideas for building a proper compost bin.  Go to full article

Nature's way of giving back to the garden

Some of what you pull out of the garden this season could be used to help nourish the soil next spring. Compost is simply decomposed organic material. While it may seem mysterious or complicated, horticulturist Amy Ivy told Todd Moe that composting is a very simple and natural process. She shares some tips.  Go to full article
Gail Brill's compost bucket
Gail Brill's compost bucket

Taking the trash along

During this Earth Week, some members of the Green Circle in the Adirondacks have been carrying their garbage with them in an effort to raise awareness of the amount of garbage they produce, how much they recycle and what they're consuming. The Green Circle was started in 2007 by a handful of folks to help move themselves towards healthier, more sustainable lives. Green Circle member Gail Brill, who lives in Saranac Lake, told Todd Moe that their "Trash Challenge" has had a profound effect on the participants.  Go to full article

Signs of spring in the yard and garden

Winter can seem long; even snow and winter sports enthusiasts begin to yearn for open ground as the sun gets stronger and stronger in March. And gardeners can start to go a little stir-crazy. This past weekend, the weather gave eager folks a chance to get outdoors. It also prompted an early season to-do list when horticulturist Amy Ivy spoke with Martha Foley this morning.

(For info on School and Community Garden Training, a workshop for teachers and community gardeners, at St. Lawrence University March 30, call 315-267-3411)  Go to full article

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