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News stories tagged with "conservation"

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/mdgovpics/11425470136/in/photostream/">Maryland GovPics</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell. Photo: Maryland GovPics, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

NY state gets $28M from feds for wildlife programs

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) New York state is getting more than $28 million from the federal government to fund fish and wildlife conservation and recreation projects.

That's the Empire State's share of the nearly $1.1 billion in excise tax revenues paid by sportsmen and sportswomen that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will distribute to state fish and wildlife agencies nationwide. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced the funding Tuesday.  Go to full article
Photo via <a href="https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10153850682500702&set=a.10151455321020702.832469.566575701&type=1&theater">Clarinets for Conservation on Facebook</a>, used with permission
Photo via Clarinets for Conservation on Facebook, used with permission

Tree-saving clarinetists bring mission to Saranac Lake

This evening, a quartet on a mission will play the BluSeed Studios in Saranac Lake. C4C Quartet will raise money for Clarinets for Conservation, an organization clarinetist Michele Von Haugg founded with a goal to save the African Blackwood Tree, or 'Mpingo, in Tanzania. The wood is used to make musical instruments including the clarinet.

Over a the last few years, Von Haugg and other clarinetists have raised money to travel to Africa to teach music and plant hundreds of trees. She told Todd Moe that the students learn about sustainability, and that learning music benefits kids in much broader ways, too.  Go to full article
Governor Andrew Cuomo, who visited Saranac Lake on Sunday, played a personal role in crafting the Finch wilderness deal. Photo:  Mark Kurtz
Governor Andrew Cuomo, who visited Saranac Lake on Sunday, played a personal role in crafting the Finch wilderness deal. Photo: Mark Kurtz

How Cuomo shaped new Adirondack wilderness

Later this month, Governor Andrew Cuomo is expected to sign off on a vast new wilderness and primitive area in the Adirondacks.

The classification deal for the former Finch lands was formally approved on Friday by the Adirondack Park Agency. But many of its details were crafted by the governor himself and by his staff in Albany.

Cuomo has taken an active role in the Finch conservation deal for more than a year, often pushing state officials, environmentalists and local government leaders to reach a compromise.  Go to full article

Books: "Adirondack Civilian Conservation Corps Camps"

This year marks the 80th anniversary of the Civilian Conservation Corps. Created by President Roosevelt during the Depression, millions of young men provided manual labor for environmental, conservation and natural resources projects across the country. Todd Moe talks with Marty Podskoch, author of Adirondack Civilian Conservation Corps Camps, a book about the CCC camps that were set up in the Adirondack-North Country region.

Podskoch interviewed dozens of former CCC workers and their families about the men who helped plant trees, build roads and fire forest fires from 1933 to 1942. He says there were 60 CCC camps in New York State, and much of the conservation work by the young men is still enjoyed today.  Go to full article
James Murphy and author Marty Podskoch at a CCC reunion in Winthrop.
James Murphy and author Marty Podskoch at a CCC reunion in Winthrop.

Memories of hard work during tough times

Eighty years ago, President Franklin Roosevelt created the Civilian Conservation Corps. The organization provided much needed employment to young men in the midst of the Great Depression.

From 1933 to 1942, more than two-million men helped plant trees in hundreds of parks across the country. They also fought forest fires, and built dams and public roadways. The CCC's results can still be seen today. And the memories of that era are still strong for 93-year-old James Murphy, of Massena. Murphy shared his thoughts at a CCC reunion last Sunday night in Winthrop. He told Todd Moe that he was 18 in 1938 and like many of his buddies in Buffalo, jobless.  Go to full article
Michele Von Haugg and <i>Clarinets for Conservation</i> member Scott Horsington joined music students at Korongoni Secondary School to plant 'Mpingo seedlings last summer. Photo: Clarinets for Conservation
Michele Von Haugg and Clarinets for Conservation member Scott Horsington joined music students at Korongoni Secondary School to plant 'Mpingo seedlings last summer. Photo: Clarinets for Conservation

Using music to save an endangered tree

Clarinetist Michele Von Haugg is on a mission to save a very important tree for a lot of musicians. She grew up near Saratoga Springs and is the founder of Clarinets for Conservation. Von Haugg will give a concert in Plattsburgh on Saturday night at the North Country Cultural Center for the Arts. Todd Moe talks with her about efforts to save the African Blackwood Tree, or 'Mpingo, in Tanzania. The wood is used to make musical instruments, like the clarinet.

Over a the last few years, Von Haugg and other clarinetists, have raised money to travel to Africa to teach music and plant hundreds of trees. She says the 'Mpingo wood is durable and very valuable.  Go to full article
The Essex Chain of Lakes. Photo: Carl Heilman II, courtesy Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy via <em>Adirondack Daily Enterprise</em>
The Essex Chain of Lakes. Photo: Carl Heilman II, courtesy Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy via Adirondack Daily Enterprise

Essex Lakes could be opened to limited motorized access

New York's Department of Environmental Conservation has proposed opening up large portions of the 69,000 acres of former Finch, Pruyn and Co. timberlands the state is acquiring from The Nature Conservancy for public recreation.

Among other things, DEC's classification plan would allow motor vehicle and limited floatplane access to the Essex Chain of Lakes tract, which would become a new canoe area.

The plan is drawing praise from local government leaders who've fought for access to the former Finch lands, and criticism from environmentalists who want more the property protected as wilderness.  Go to full article

Champlain Valley land to be preserved

A property owner between the towns of Essex, NY and Willsboro has donated a conservation easement that will preserve more than 300 acres for forest and farmland in the Champlain Valley.

According to the group Champlain Area Trails, the fields protected under the easement will continue to be farmed.

A forested section of the property will be developed for public hiking and cross-country skiing trails.

The easement was donated by the DeNeale family. It will prevent most development on the land which sits on a section of Lakeshore Road.  Go to full article
Student Conservation Association president  Dale Penny.  He's one of the guest speakers Saturday at the Paul Smiths College VIC.   Photo: SCA
Student Conservation Association president Dale Penny. He's one of the guest speakers Saturday at the Paul Smiths College VIC. Photo: SCA

Green groups seek better communication, collaboration

Leaders from the region's environmental and conservation groups will gather at the Paul Smiths College VIC on Saturday to talk about improving communication, collaborations and the next generation of stewardship of the Adirondacks.

The nonprofit organization Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve is sponsoring the workshop at the Paul Smith's College VIC. Todd Moe talks with one of the keynote speakers at the workshop - Dale Penny, president of the Student Conservation Association.  Go to full article
The Essex Chain of Lakes will be purchased by New York State this year. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy)
The Essex Chain of Lakes will be purchased by New York State this year. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy)

NY to shape public use of new Adirondack park land

State officials say they plan to buy the first big chunk of the former Finch timberlands by the end of the year.

Roughly 19,000 acres will be added to the "forever wild" forest preserve in the first phase of the project. State officials say they plan to buy the first big chunk of the former Finch timberlands by the end of the year. Roughly 19,000 acres will be added to the "forever wild" forest preserve in the first phase of the project. Supporters say these lands will open popular new areas for hiking, paddling, hunting and fishing.

The process is now underway to determine the kind of rules and guidelines that will shape public access, and state officials say they hope to avoid the kind of clashes that have marked past land classification efforts.  Go to full article

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