Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "conservation"

Lawmakers Sit on Conservation Funding After September 11

Conservation groups say New York's legislature is withholding on tens of millions of dollars that should be spent on environmental projects. The Environmental Protection Fund is one of hundreds of programs derailed by the September 11 attacks. As Brian Mann reports, loss of the money could affect a deal in the Adirondacks that would add 26,000 acres to state forest land.  Go to full article

A Journey to Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, part 3

Alaska's arctic is a place of contrasts. For decades, the vast Prudhoe Bay oil fields have helped to feed the national economy. But the north slope also holds some of America's wildest--and most pristine--places. Brian Mann visited Alaska this summer. In this final part of his special series, Brian looks at two possible futures facing the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.  Go to full article

A Journey to Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, part 2

Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is one of the most remote places on earth. The tundra plain also holds one of the last great deposits of crude oil in North America. If oil development goes forward in the Refuge, it could affect caribou and polar bears. But drilling would also reshape the lives of people who live and travel in the Arctic. Brian Mann spent a month Alaska this summer.  Go to full article

A Journey to Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, part 1

After the terror attacks on September 11, the US House of Representatives voted to open Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil development. The plan is backed by President Bush, who says the oil would lessen America's reliance on the Middle East. The bill is stalled in the Senate. Democratic leaders say the measure would do little to foster energy independence. Many pro-environment groups claim that opening ANWR would destroy one of the world's great wilderness areas. Brian Mann traveled to the Arctic this summer and begins his special report.  Go to full article

People: Clarence Petty, Adirondack Conservationist

Last month, 94-year-old Clarence Petty was honored with the Wilderness Society's Robert Marshall award for a career of activism in the Adirondacks. Petty is one of the most respected men in New York's conservation movement, having grown up in the mountains and lived most of his life in the woods. Reporter Brian Mann met recently with Petty and has this profile of a man still passionate about wild lands.  Go to full article

Large Scale Wetland Reclamation

Lost wetlands are restored for a number of reasons. Sometimes, they replace a wetlands area lost because of construction or farming. Typically those projects are small in scope. Now a conservation group is looking to create an entire ecosystem in the Midwest through a massive wetland restoration program. The plan is garnering attention from scientists as a new model for how to return land to its natural state. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Jonathan Ahl reports.  Go to full article

Heat Wave Spurs Power Generation and Conservation Planning

This week's heat wave has revived talk of the larger issues of the need for new power plants and permanent conservation efforts. Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article

Nature Conservancy Protects Fragile Alpine Vegetation on Adirondack Peaks

For over a decade the Adirondack Nature Conservancy has been protecting the alpines of the Adirondacks through education and careful observation. But that may not be enough, and the group's started a new technique for conservation--carrying rocks up to the summits to stabilize the delicate plants that grow there. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

These aren't the droids you're looking for...

Sorry, but the story you've requested isn't available right now.

These aren't the droids you're looking for...

Sorry, but the story you've requested isn't available right now.

« first  « previous 10  93-194 of 100