Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "cooking"

In the baking aisle of the Potsdam Food Co-op.  Lots of choices -- grains, seeds, lentils, beans, flours. Photo: Todd Moe
In the baking aisle of the Potsdam Food Co-op. Lots of choices -- grains, seeds, lentils, beans, flours. Photo: Todd Moe

A new twist on an old grain at the Potsdam Food Co-op

There are a lot of grains, beans and seeds out there that we're told are nutritious, but what's the best way to prepare them? The Potsdam Food Co-op has kicked off its monthly tasting series this summer.

"Juanita's 1st Thursday Creations" is an opportunity to sample something new. The Co-op's Wendy Turnbull and cook Juanita Babcock gave Todd Moe a tour of the baking aisle this week for a lesson on how to cook a tiny seed known as Amaranth. It's packed with iron, calcium, fiber and gluten-free.  Go to full article

Saranac Lake cooking columnist publishes "eating local" cookbook

As a beginner at cooking locally and seasonally, I needed some expert advice on how to work with what you have and make the most of summer. Luckily, I was able to talk with Yvonna Fast last Thursday at Nature's Storehouse, where she was holding a book signing about her self-published cookbook, "Garden Gourmet: Fresh & Fabulous Meals from your North Country Garden, CSA, or Farmers' Market."  Go to full article
Rebecca Weld of Potsdam is "The Cookie Architect." Last year she sent blank, puzzle-piece-style gingerbread cookies out to a few dozen of her favorite cookiers. Each returned a fully designed cookie, and Weld built them into a <a href="http://cookieconnection.juliausher.com/blog/gingerbread-house-of-cards">Gingergread House of Cards</a> - a meta-cookie, if you will. All photos: David Sommerstein, unless indicated
Rebecca Weld of Potsdam is "The Cookie Architect." Last year she sent blank, puzzle-piece-style gingerbread cookies out to a few dozen of her favorite cookiers. Each returned a fully designed cookie, and Weld built them into a Gingergread House of Cards - a meta-cookie, if you will. All photos: David Sommerstein, unless indicated

Potsdam "cookie architect" makes edible art

You might remember the rise of the gourmet cupcake from several years back. Now, a new designer baking trend it involves that humblest of desserts - the cookie. Bakers around the country and around the world are making incredibly intricate and artistic cookies, and then sharing photos of their creations online.

One cookie designer who won what you might call the "Oscar" of cookie culture last year lives right here in the North Country. Rebecca Weld earns her living as an architect in Potsdam. But during her free time, Weld is hunched over the kitchen counter, like an alchemist, dripping food coloring drop by drop and stirring to achieve the perfect colored icing to decorate cookies.  Go to full article

"Three Squares" traces the rise and fall of the American meal

Vermont food historian and scholar Abigail Carroll's new book, Three Squares: The Invention of the American Meal, is the story behind our modern eating habits. And it might be surprising to learn that the way we eat today is not as age-old as we might think. Three meals a day, that many of us try to adhere to, has more to do with cultural inheritance than biological necessity. Todd Moe spoke with Carrol about the history of meals from colonial breakfast porridge to modern casseroles and snack foods.  Go to full article
Dan Mullin minds his grill at the Potsdam Summer Festival. Photo: Conant Neville
Dan Mullin minds his grill at the Potsdam Summer Festival. Photo: Conant Neville

Barbecue is serious business

A lot of people like to barbecue in the summer. For most, it's a relaxing activity. For others it's serious business. Dan Mullin of Gouverneur has a passion for cooking and has made a career out of it. Conant Neville caught him at the Potsdam Summer Festival as he was flipping burgers and mixing barbecue sauces for this "Heard up North" feature.  Go to full article
Three members of the Hermon-DeKalb <i>Dominators</i> taste-test their Hillbilly Chili during the Junior Iron Chef contest in Canton.   Photo: Todd Moe
Three members of the Hermon-DeKalb Dominators taste-test their Hillbilly Chili during the Junior Iron Chef contest in Canton. Photo: Todd Moe

Heard up North: Young chefs have fun cooking, competing

More than two-dozen teams of young cooks from Franklin, Jefferson and St. Lawrence Counties gathered to show off their culinary skills in Canton on Saturday. Middle and high school teams with names like, The Bacon Boys of Brasher Falls, Peru Blue and the Massena Treble Chefs, competed for top kitchen honors at the North Country Junior Iron Chef competition at St. Lawrence University. The event was organized by St. Lawrence Health Initiative. The dishes were judged based on taste, creativity, presentation and whether their peers would eat them in the school cafeteria.

For today's Heard Up North, Todd Moe caught up with the Hermon-DeKalb Dominators -- 6th and 7th graders Garrett, Miranda and Cassidy, and their faculty coach Erin Green -- working on their Hillbilly Chili recipe.  Go to full article
Jemila Saleh in her kitchen in Potsdam. Photo: Natasha Haverty
Jemila Saleh in her kitchen in Potsdam. Photo: Natasha Haverty

Eritrean refugee finds home in cooking

Eritrea is a small country in the African Horn. It's been at war on and off with neighboring Ethiopia for decades. And since 2001, the government has been sending thousands of its citizens to prison for being a part of any faith group that isn't on the government's approved list of churches.

Jemila Saleh is sure she would have been sent to prison for her beliefs, if it hadn't been for a series of what she calls miracles. Just after her pastor was imprisoned, Jemila connected with a church here in the North Country, and they offered to support her escape. So in the middle of the night Jemila packed up all she could, and got on airplane with her three daughters. Members of the church picked them up at the Syracuse airport with a backseat full of blankets and winter coats, and brought them to their new apartment in Potsdam, which the church members had rented and furnished.

Four and a half years later, Jemila has a degree in finance from SUNY Canton, her daughters are in school, and Jemila is practicing her faith freely here. But the way she's kept a grip on her life, and her story, is through cooking.  Go to full article
Kohlrabi for sale at the Canton farm market last summer. Photo: Julie Grant
Kohlrabi for sale at the Canton farm market last summer. Photo: Julie Grant

Cooking up something new: kohlrabi

Food is on many a mind as Thanksgiving approaches. Of course, there will be potatoes, squash, and green beans for the big meal. But what about something different?

This past summer, Julie Grant was at the Canton farmers' market looking for something new to put on the table. So she picked up a space-age looking veggie, a kohlrabi, and set out to find some recipes.  Go to full article
Mrs. McGarrigle's Fine Mustard anchors one of Merrickville's charming main streets.
Mrs. McGarrigle's Fine Mustard anchors one of Merrickville's charming main streets.

More than mustard: sharing the region's bounty

Farmers, chefs and retailers gathered in Kingston, Ontario yesterday to share ideas about locally produced food. Todd Moe talks with entrepreneur Janet Campbell, who was the featured speaker at the first Great Waterway Regional Culinary Tourism Summit.

For nearly 20 years, Campbell has owned and managed Mrs. McGarrigle's Fine Mustard in historic Merrickville, Ontario. She uses locally grown ingredients, including Canadian mustard seeds, in her products. Displays in her store feature many foods - cookies, chutneys and cheeses - created by regional growers and chefs. Todd Moe toured her shop and spoke with Janet Campbell about how the localvore culture can promote tourism and local economies.  Go to full article
Rosemary, looking like it's getting too much water.
Rosemary, looking like it's getting too much water.

Bringing herbs indoors

The outdoor gardening season is about over, but cooks can still enjoy fresh herbs, with a little luck and the proper care. Amy Ivy, horticulturist with the Cornell Cooperative Exstension offices in Clinton and Essex County shares some tips and some warnings with Martha Foley.  Go to full article

1-10 of 32  next 10 »  last »