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News stories tagged with "cornell"

A nest with Eastern Bluebird eggs.  Photo: Carl Austin, Jr., Grovetown, GA
A nest with Eastern Bluebird eggs. Photo: Carl Austin, Jr., Grovetown, GA

Want to keep an eye on bird nests this spring?

Lots of birds have begun returning to the North Country from their wintering grounds. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology is recruiting volunteers for its annual NestWatch citizen science project. Participants map any nest or birdhouse location on the NestWatch website. They report the species of nesting bird, when eggs laid, how many hatch and how many fledglings leave the nest.

Todd Moe spoke with NestWatch project leader Robyn Bailey says the nationwide program tracks and analyzes nesting bird data all year. She says sometimes NestWatchers see something remarkable that surprises scientists.  Go to full article

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A male Common Redpoll (photo: Larry Master, Lake Placid)
A male Common Redpoll (photo: Larry Master, Lake Placid)

Birders prepare for annual count

Birders in the Northeast expect to see fewer robins and more redpolls as thousands of citizen scientists across North America get out their tally sheets for the 14th annual Great Backyard Bird Count, sponsored by Audubon and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Pat Leonard, of the Cornell Lab, helps coordinate the annual weekend count. She says the survey, which began this morning and continues through Presidents' Day, gives a snapshot of bird populations and migration trends. Leonard says the event typically records millions of observations.  Go to full article
LaFargeville students fill buckets with soil and tomato seedlings for local food pantries.
LaFargeville students fill buckets with soil and tomato seedlings for local food pantries.

Fighting hunger by the bucket

Three hundred "bucket gardens" are being handed out to those in need at food pantries in Jefferson County this week. LaFargeville students, nutrition experts at Cornell Cooperative Extension and the Food Bank of Central New York have teamed up again this year to help increase food security and decrease hunger. Rosalind Cook, with Cornell Cooperation Extension, told Todd Moe that the "garden in a bucket" program began four years ago, and each year they get more ambitious.  Go to full article

Cornell asks backyard birders to help out

Ornithologists at Cornell University would like the public's help with counting birds this winter. Project FeederWatch runs from November 14th through early April. Participants count the number and kinds of birds at their feeders and enter it online. Todd Moe talks with ornithologist and Project Feeder Watch coordinator David Bonter.  Go to full article
The Uihlein Maple Research Station, Lake Placid. Photo: Brian Chabot
The Uihlein Maple Research Station, Lake Placid. Photo: Brian Chabot

Study looks at climate change and maple season

Six North Country maple producers are working with Cornell University researchers on climate change and its effects on the industry. The climate patterns producing warmer winter weather and increased thawing in January are causing some maple producers to test their taps earlier in the winter. Todd Moe spoke with Mike Farrell, Director of the Uihlein Maple Research Station in Lake Placid, about climate warming and maple production. Will the North Country's annual Maple Weekend in 2080 be held in mid-January?  Go to full article
The Angel of Inerrancy, by Ted Cornell (Source:  Crooked Brook website)
The Angel of Inerrancy, by Ted Cornell (Source: Crooked Brook website)

Sculptor Ted Cornell reinvents self, North Country farm

If you drive down the back roads near Wadhams, in Essex County, you may come across an old farm that straddles Crooked Brook. In the place of corn and hay you'll find massive sculptures turning slowly in the wind. Piles of stone decorate the fields. This is the reinvented world of Ted Cornell, an artist and activist who made his home in the North Country fifteen years ago. Brian Mann visited Cornell's farm this autumn and sent this audio postcard.  Go to full article

Emergency farm meeting planned

Severe storms last Thursday knocked out power to thousands of people across the North Country and Vermont. Strong winds downed trees and power lines, even blew over a tractor-trailer on the Adirondack Northway. The fast-moving storms also produced hail which hit some area farm fields hard. Damage to crops was severe in the Beekmantown area. Clinton counties cooperative Extension is holding an emergency meeting today at noon to talk about what farmers can do to salvage as much of their harvest as possible. Field corn, hay and soybeans will be the focus. The meeting will be held at the Bill Atwood farm on the corner of Burke and Pardy roads. Martha Foley talks with horticulturist Amy Ivy about today's meeting.  Go to full article

Farmers facing real winter weather

Temperatures this winter have left a lot of people wondering... December's 70-degree days caused flowers to bloom - but also contributed to concerns over global warming. This week's cold snap - reassuring to some - has raised new questions about the health of the North Country's ecosystem. What do these fluctuating temperatures do to plants, soils and watersheds? Was there any damage to area farms? Or livestock? Jonathan Brown put these questions to farm-business manager Bill Van Loo, at the Cornell Cooperative Extension.  Go to full article

Gardening success stories

Horticulturist Amy Ivy has news about a new on-line resource for gardeners. The new website allows growers to share gardening updates, vegetable and seed reviews and growing guides.  Go to full article

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