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News stories tagged with "cornell-cooperative-extension"

Video at healthcare.gov attempts to explain how the healthcare marketplace will function. CCE hopes to help clarify how New Yorkers will cope with the changes.
Video at healthcare.gov attempts to explain how the healthcare marketplace will function. CCE hopes to help clarify how New Yorkers will cope with the changes.

As enrollment in NY health exchanges nears, CCE offers a hand

New York's new health exchange opens for business October 1st. It's one of the first direct contacts most people will have with the federal Affordable Care Act. The State Health Department has been working on the exchange for months, and recently launched a campaign to convince New Yorkers that it will be an easy, efficient way to find and buy health insurance under Obamacare.

But people are confused about how it will work, and how it will affect their businesses, including how this new marketplace will function. Zach Hirsch reports on a series of workshops that might help.  Go to full article

In the garden: already time for a clean-up

No rest for the weary gardeners! This time of year, it's all about getting things really set for the growing season. The vegetable seeds and transplants go in. The perennials are divided. The mulch goes down. The trellises are back in place, and fences are mended. But it's not quite all about anticipation...there's some clean-up to be done, too. Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy has tips on daffodils, tulips and all those volunteers.  Go to full article

Vegetable gardeners on the look-out for a return of late blight

It was in the 80s and 90s across the North Country this past weekend. Some eager gardeners were no doubt out in the vegetable patch, planting the earliest of early crops, like spinach and peas. It won't be long till the planting season is underway in earnest. And there's an important question lingering from last year: what about late blight?

Horticulturist Amy Ivy assures Martha Foley there are no worries about tomatoes carrying the disease over the winter, but potatoes are another story.  Go to full article

It's a good time to start over with houseplants

Horticulturist Amy Ivy says she spent time this past weekend propagating a whole new generation of houseplants. Geraniums, a goldfish plant, a jade tree -- all got a fresh start. Amy, with the Cornell Cooperative Extension Service, is a true green thumb. But according to what she told Martha Foley, starting new plants from old ones isn't only for the expert gardener.  Go to full article

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