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News stories tagged with "corning"

from left, are Anthony Collins, president, Clarkson University; Judge Eugene Nicandri, NYPA trustee; Dekalb Town Supervisor John Frary, St. Lawrence County Legislator Fred Morrill, Assemblywoman Addie Russell; Stephen Hunt, North Country Regional Director, ESD, Gil C. Quiniones, NYPA president and CEO; David Lucht, Corning's Canton plant manager; Curt Weinstein, vice president and GM, Advanced Optics, Corning Specialty Materials; Assemblyman Ken Blankenbush; Senator Patty Ritchie; Patrick Kelly, CEO, St. Lawrence County Industrial Development Agency; and Canton Mayor Mary Ann Ashley. Photo: New York Power Authority
from left, are Anthony Collins, president, Clarkson University; Judge Eugene Nicandri, NYPA trustee; Dekalb Town Supervisor John Frary, St. Lawrence County Legislator Fred Morrill, Assemblywoman Addie Russell; Stephen Hunt, North Country Regional Director, ESD, Gil C. Quiniones, NYPA president and CEO; David Lucht, Corning's Canton plant manager; Curt Weinstein, vice president and GM, Advanced Optics, Corning Specialty Materials; Assemblyman Ken Blankenbush; Senator Patty Ritchie; Patrick Kelly, CEO, St. Lawrence County Industrial Development Agency; and Canton Mayor Mary Ann Ashley. Photo: New York Power Authority

Corning celebrates expansion, 40 new jobs in Canton

State and local leaders dug shovels into dirt last week to celebrate the expansion of the Corning plant in Canton. Corning is investing $21 million and creating 40 new jobs.  Go to full article
The Long Sault Dam is part of the hydropower generating complex on the St. Lawrence River near Massena. Photo: New York Power Authority
The Long Sault Dam is part of the hydropower generating complex on the St. Lawrence River near Massena. Photo: New York Power Authority

Corning gets a boost from NYPA, pledges to add 40 jobs

Corning Incorpoarted's Canton Facility is getting a boost from the New York State Power Authority--2.1 megawatts to be exact. The low-cost St. Lawrence hydropower comes in exchange for the creation of 40 permanent jobs at the plant.  Go to full article
Steuben Vase Copper Wheel Engraving. Source: postcard, Corning Glass Center
Steuben Vase Copper Wheel Engraving. Source: postcard, Corning Glass Center

Steuben Glass closure a long time coming

Steuben Glass will officially shutter its Corning factory on November 29. But as the Innovation Trail's Matt Richmond reports, the company's closure has been coming for a long time.  Go to full article

Steuben Glass closing down

Steuben Glass plans to close its doors on November 29th, after more than 100 years making glassware. The Innovation Trail's Matt Richmond reports on the company's long slide toward closure.  Go to full article
Randy and Sharlene Carpenter, with their son.
Randy and Sharlene Carpenter, with their son.

Year of Hard Choices: A job search, delayed

At the beginning of this year, we began a series called A Year of Hard Choices, looking at the challenges posed by economic losses and budget deficits. You can review all of our coverage on our website, ncpr.org. One of those stories introduced us to the Carpenters. Sharlene and Randy are both in their late 40s. They live in Heuvelton. Sharlene lost her job three days before Christmas last year. She made high tech glass lenses at the Corning plant in Canton. She was collecting unemployment. Her husband, Randy, had been laid off from a pallet mill three months earlier. Randy was looking for work at Fort Drum. Recently, David Sommerstein visited the Carpenters again to see how 2009 treated them, and what next year may have in store.  Go to full article
Sharlene and Randy Carpenter and their granddaughter, Riley.
Sharlene and Randy Carpenter and their granddaughter, Riley.

A Year of Hard Choices: Checking in with the Carpenters

Yesterday in the first installment of our Year of Hard Choices series, we heard economics professor Greg Gardner say manufacturing jobs have been the early victims of the recession in the North Country. General Motors in Massena and Covidien in Watertown are shutting down entirely. Alcoa and New York Air Brake have laid off workers. Corning halved its workforce in 2008. That means hundreds of people around the North Country can no longer rely on a steady wage. They'll spend less at stores, theaters, restaurants, and car dealerships. Their lean times trickle down to local businesses, which may then suffer layoffs of their own. Sharlene Carpenter got her pink slip from Corning in late December, just a few months after her husband, Randy, lost his job at a local pallet mill. For today's installment in our Year of Hard Choices series, we check back with Sharlene and Randy Carpenter at their home in Heuvelton. As David Sommerstein reports, their time off of work hasn't been so bad, but tough choices loom ahead.  Go to full article

Corning to lay off a dozen more

Corning will cut another dozen jobs at its plant in Canton. The company has laid off 80 workers there in the last six months. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Corning cuts jobs as profits slump

Corning Incorporated announced yesterday it's cutting 3,500 jobs. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

Corning workers reflect on jobs cuts

Earlier this month, Corning Incorporated, the high tech glassmaker, put up a list of names on the bulletin board in its plant in Canton. They were the names of 34 people whose last day of work would be three days before Christmas. Sharlene Carpenter of Heuvelton and Phil Furnace of Brasher saw their names on that list. They sat down with David Sommerstein to talk about being casualties of the economy and what the future holds. Corning began cutting its workforce in Canton more than a year ago. Furnace says his layoff was hard not to take personally.  Go to full article

Corning lays off 34; union questions timing

Labor is criticizing the timing of layoffs at the Corning plant in Canton. The high-tech glassmaker is cutting 34 jobs at the same time the plant will shut down for two weeks over the holidays to save money. The union says workers will essentially lose their jobs three days before Christmas. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

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