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News stories tagged with "craft"

Annette and Sherman Craig retired to the Adirondacks, volunteering and forming a woodworking business. Photo: Brian Mann
Annette and Sherman Craig retired to the Adirondacks, volunteering and forming a woodworking business. Photo: Brian Mann

Woodworking and activism in the shadow of a shuttered mill

This summer, North Country Public Radio has been reporting on the final closure of the paper mill in Newton Falls. A Canadian firm has auctioned off the mill's equipment and is looking for a buyer for the land and buildings.

It's an old story in our region, as factories, mines, and mills have closed or moved overseas. One big question for places like southern St. Lawrence County is - what next? What will the next economy look like?

This morning, Brian Mann profiles Sherman and Annette Craig, owners of Wanakena Woodworks.

They're artisan furniture makers and community activists who hope that their kind of investment can help revitalize struggling corners of the Park.  Go to full article
Emily Holt at work, summer 2011. Looking over her shoulder is the Rev. Thomas Brown of the Parish of the Epiphany in Winchester, Mass. She said he had no idea the embroidery would take over two years to complete. Photo courtesy Caroline Larson
Emily Holt at work, summer 2011. Looking over her shoulder is the Rev. Thomas Brown of the Parish of the Epiphany in Winchester, Mass. She said he had no idea the embroidery would take over two years to complete. Photo courtesy Caroline Larson

Heard Up North: Emily Holt

In today's Heard Up North, we meet a woman who's one of the last experts in ecclesiastical embroidery in America. Emily Holt has spent 60 years illuminating church altars and vestments with specialized and painstaking hand-work.

Martha Foley visited her summer work space in the Thousand Islands, where she was finishing up her latest project. After two and a half years of work, she hopes to have a reproduction of an altarpiece for her church done for Christmas.  Go to full article
Sam drives the tacks, Ev holds the rib and the clenching iron.
Sam drives the tacks, Ev holds the rib and the clenching iron.

Heard Up North: steam-bending, baby-size

Steam-bent ribs are a standard feature in many traditional boats. Oak (or other wood) ribs are softened by steaming, then quickly forced to conform to inside of the shell of the boat and clench-nailed in place. It's a two-man job. And the process is the same, big boat or small. Sam Newman got help bending the ribs into a very traditional, but very small craft: a cradle.  Go to full article
Nancy Hammill with her drop spindle-full of new yarn. Her tutor, Donna Adams of Long Lake, looks on.
Nancy Hammill with her drop spindle-full of new yarn. Her tutor, Donna Adams of Long Lake, looks on.

Heard Up North: dropping the drop spindle

Nancy Hammill of Ft. Jackson was at Traditional Arts in Upstate New York recently for a lesson in an ancient craft: turning wool fleece into yarn by hand with a drop spindle. She and her tutor, Donna Adams of Long Lake, are today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article
Sandy Maine hopes to break into mass market retail with "Bug Off."
Sandy Maine hopes to break into mass market retail with "Bug Off."

A Year of Hard Choices: SunFeather Soap - tough times, hope for the future

In our Year of Hard Choices series today, we go to a mainstay of the North Country's homegrown business community. You find the SunFeather Soap Company in a tidy, low building on the old state road outside Parishville, in St. Lawrence County. Martha Foley went for a tour, and got a lesson in small business 101.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: pounding black ash for basket-making

Black ash is one of the sources of raw material for Native American basket makers. They de-bark and then pound ash logs to produce long, pliable strips. Gregory Warner learned the basics from a master: Henry Arquette of Akwesasne.  Go to full article
Adirondack guideboat (Source:  Chris Woodward)
Adirondack guideboat (Source: Chris Woodward)

Heard Up North: Building An Adirondack Guideboat

Paddlers competed yesterday in the 44th annual Willard Hanmer guide boat race in Saranac Lake. Hanmer was one of the great Adirondack boat builders. In today's Heard Up North, we hear from Chris Woodward who now operates Hanmer's boat building shop.  Go to full article

For Women Who Knit Too Much

The yarn harlot comes to Canton tonight. Stephanie Pearl-McPhee is author of a book called "At Knit's End" Meditation for Women Who Knit Too Much", author also of a funny web blog for people like her who are obsessed with knitting. Pearl-McPhee is a mother in her mid-thirties, a Canadian. She's found echoes of her OWN fixation in the hearts of knitters across both Canada and the US. She'll be at the St. Lawrence University Bookstore in Canton this evening from 6 to 8. Martha Foley spoke with her in May. She was at home in Toronto.  Go to full article

"An Adventure": Mixed Reviews for NYC Street Fair from North Country Artisans

17 artisans from the North Country caravanned to New York City this weekend. They set up booths at one of the largest one day street fairs in the country. The fair stretched for 20 blocks down 2nd avenue in Manhattan. Woodworker Dave Crosby called in by cell phone just after the fair ended.

Dave and the other artisans are part of the Northern Adirondack Trading Cooperative; a project organized by the St Lawrence County Chamber of Commerce. The cooperative is an international finalist for a World Chamber award for micro-enterprise initiatives.  Go to full article
Vest by Barbara Cobb
Vest by Barbara Cobb

North Country Artisans Head to NYC

A small business initiative in St Lawrence County was named as an international finalist for the World Chamber of Commerce's "Best Unconventional Project" award. It's the only American finalist in any category. The Northern Adirondack Trading Cooperative was launched in 2003. It offers technology and marketing tools and workshops to small business owners and artisans. Next weekend, most of the group is caravaning to New York City for a one day street fair said to attract over a million people. Greg Warner stopped by their last meeting and brings us this report.  Go to full article

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