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News stories tagged with "cree"

Rupert River diversion was a massive industrial project rooted in Quebec's wilderness (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Rupert River diversion was a massive industrial project rooted in Quebec's wilderness (Photo: Brian Mann)

As Northeast looks to Hydro Quebec for power, thorny environmental questions remain

Northeast states are increasingly looking to Canada to meet a growing demand for low cost hydro electricity from renewable sources.

But the energy imports are stirring controversy. In northern New Hampshire, local activists are fighting a power line that would send the electricity south. And questions are being raised about whether big hydro is really green.

As part of a collaboration of Northeast stations John Dillon of Vermont Public Radio reports.

Northeast environmental reporting is made possible, in part, by a grant from United Technologies. Northeast environmental coverage is part of NPR's Local News Initiative.  Go to full article
The Rupert River before it was diverted by Hydro Quebec
The Rupert River before it was diverted by Hydro Quebec

Story 2.0: Power for the US, a changed river for the Cree

As we've been hearing in John Dillon's report, there is a debate raging over the future of Hydro Quebec's power projects and their impact on the environment.

Brian Mann has traveled repeatedly to Cree Crounty in northern Quebec, talking with local leaders about the way industrial power projects are changing their villages and the landscape.

This morning as part of our series Story 2.0, we'll revisit his report from 2007.  Go to full article
The wild Rupert River will soon be altered radically.
The wild Rupert River will soon be altered radically.

On a wild Quebec river, wolves, caribou and the encroachment of industry

Last November, Brian Mann reported on plans to dam and divert the massive Rupert River in northern Quebec. The project, developed by the provincial utility, Hydro-Quebec, will provide hydroelectricity to consumers in New York and Vermont. His story was recognized with an Edward R. Murrow Award. Last week, Brian returned to paddle the Rupert again. He made the trip as part of a documentary project called "Encounters." Here's his reporter's notebook.  Go to full article
The wild Rupert River is already straddled by distribution lines
The wild Rupert River is already straddled by distribution lines

Electricity bound for NY, VT comes at a cost for the Cree

Beginning today, North Country Public Radio will air a series of special reports about a part of the world that feels very remote: the Cree Indian territory in northern Canada.

Back in the 1990s, New York's then-governor, Mario Cuomo, canceled a $15 billion deal to buy hydroelectric power from Quebec. That move effectively killed a project that would have built a network of dams and reservoirs along the Great Whale River, near James Bay. That was a victory for the Cree and for their allies in the environmental community. But now Hydro-Quebec is moving forward with a new project that will uproot and rechannel another northern river. Supporters say it's an engineering feat that rivals the Trans-Alaska pipeline, one that will supply cheap, carbon-free electricity to consumers in New York state and Vermont. As Brian Mann reports, the Rupert River is sacred to the Cree who live nearby.  Go to full article

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