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News stories tagged with "crime"

Gun rights activist Richard Mack (L) and Clinton County Sheriff David Favro (R) at a press conference earlier this summer in Plattsburgh, opposing the New York SAFE Act. Photo: Brian Mann
Gun rights activist Richard Mack (L) and Clinton County Sheriff David Favro (R) at a press conference earlier this summer in Plattsburgh, opposing the New York SAFE Act. Photo: Brian Mann

Cuomo: sheriffs can't pick and choose among laws

Gov. Andrew Cuomo says law enforcement officials don't get to pick and choose which laws to enforce.

Speaking yesterday in Ausable Forks, Cuomo said that includes county sheriffs who've publicly opposed the state's new gun control measure.  Go to full article
Israel Keyes (top right) being interrogated by FBI investigators a few days before he committed suicide in 2012.  (Photo:  Screen capture of FBI video)
Israel Keyes (top right) being interrogated by FBI investigators a few days before he committed suicide in 2012. (Photo: Screen capture of FBI video)

Israel Keyes video shows cunning, remorseless killer

This month, the FBI made public more information about the serial killer Israel Keyes, whose murder spree included time in the North Country and Vermont. Authorities believe that Keyes' murder spree continued for more than a decade and left as many as 11 people dead before he was captured in March of 2012.

Keyes committed suicide in a jail cell in Alaska last December, leaving unanswered questions about most of his victims.

For the first time, the FBI has released hours of video tape from their interviews with Keyes. The video offers a terrifying portrait of a killer who felt no remorse, who at times seemed to be taunting investigators.  Go to full article
The  Rev. Oberia Dempsey campaigned early against drugs in Harlem. Photo: Wikipedia
The Rev. Oberia Dempsey campaigned early against drugs in Harlem. Photo: Wikipedia

Why did black leaders support America's drug war for so long?

This year, North Country Public Radio is looking in-depth at America's forty year long drug war. Tough-on-crime policies, sparked in part by New York's Rockefeller drug laws, changed the way we think about crime and justice and addiction. They also changed the North Country, as more and more prisons were built to house the swelling number of inmates.

This morning, our series continues with a look at how the drug war has been viewed within the African American community. Some black leaders see tough crime laws as racially biased and unfair. But many supporters of the drug war hoped that long prison sentences and harsh penalties would help clean up neighborhoods plagued by drugs.  Go to full article
Charles Rangel (L) at the signing of a drug-war era law with Nancy Reagan and President Ronald Reagan. Photo:  Wikipedia
Charles Rangel (L) at the signing of a drug-war era law with Nancy Reagan and President Ronald Reagan. Photo: Wikipedia

Charles Rangel: America's "front-line general" in the drug war

America's black leadership supported the drug war for decades in large part because of the efforts of one man.

Charles Rangel, a former federal prosecutor and Korean War veteran, emerged as one of the dominant figures in the nation's politics.

He was also a fierce supporter of tough crime policies and was once described as the "front-line general in the war on drugs" by Ebony magazine.

Our profile of Charles Rangel is the latest installment in our Prison Time Media Project series.  Go to full article
Serial killer Israel Keyes spent significant time in the North Country and Vermont and owned land in Franklin County.  The FBI is hoping the public can provide more information about his activities. Photo: Anchorage Police Department
Serial killer Israel Keyes spent significant time in the North Country and Vermont and owned land in Franklin County. The FBI is hoping the public can provide more information about his activities. Photo: Anchorage Police Department

Who did Israel Keyes murder and where are the bodies?

FBI officials this week released their latest timeline of the activities of Israel Keyes, the serial killer who spent part of his time in the North Country and Vermont.

Keyes committed suicide in his jail cell in Alaska last December 1. His death has left investigators scrambling to identify Keyes' victims and the locations of their bodies.  Go to full article
Gun rights activist Richard Mack (L) and Clinton County Sheriff David Favro (R) hold a press conference in Plattsburgh, opposing the New York SAFE Act. Photo: Brian Mann
Gun rights activist Richard Mack (L) and Clinton County Sheriff David Favro (R) hold a press conference in Plattsburgh, opposing the New York SAFE Act. Photo: Brian Mann

Will upstate NY cops, sheriffs enforce gun control laws?

New York's tough gun law, known as the SAFE Act, was pushed through last January by Governor Andrew Cuomo, winning support from the Democratic Assembly and the Republican-controlled Senate.

Over the last six months, however, political opposition to the law has grown, especially in upstate counties where gun ownership is popular. A growing number of law enforcement officials, especially county sheriffs, now say they're deeply troubled by the law, which bans assault rifles and large ammunition clips. Some officers say they won't actively enforce the SAFE Act.  Go to full article
Gov. Andrew Cuomo announces the formation of the "Commission to Investigate Public Corruption" under the Moreland Act and Executive Law Section 63(8) to probe systemic public corruption and the appearance of such corruption in state government, political campaigns and elections in New York State. Photo:  Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office via <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/governorandrewcuomo/page2/">Flickr</a>
Gov. Andrew Cuomo announces the formation of the "Commission to Investigate Public Corruption" under the Moreland Act and Executive Law Section 63(8) to probe systemic public corruption and the appearance of such corruption in state government, political campaigns and elections in New York State. Photo: Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office via Flickr

NYS corruption commission issues subpoenas

The co-chair of Governor Cuomo's Moreland Act Commission on public corruption, Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice, says subpoenas have been sent out and more public hearings are planned.  Go to full article
Bedford Hills Correctional Facility. Photo by Amy Lindemuth
Bedford Hills Correctional Facility. Photo by Amy Lindemuth

In NYS prison, women hold on to motherhood

In New York state's prison nursery program, a woman can qualify to live with her newborn baby for up to one year.

But during the many hours when their mothers have to attend programs like GED classes or addiction counseling, or work in the garment shop, these babies have another group of inmates who look after them. Each of these inmate caregivers has to go through a long training to have this job. And the majority of them are mothers themselves.

This morning, our Prison Time Media Project continues, with a profile of one caregiver at Bedford Hills, New York's maximum-security prison for women.  Go to full article
Cassidy and Hermione. Cassidy says she has to work hard not to obsess about the day her daughter will leave. "You can't get sad about it yet, because everything that you feel they feel." Photo: Natasha Haverty
Cassidy and Hermione. Cassidy says she has to work hard not to obsess about the day her daughter will leave. "You can't get sad about it yet, because everything that you feel they feel." Photo: Natasha Haverty

When should babies stay with their moms in NY prisons?

The number of women in American prisons has gone up 800 percent over the last thirty years, according to the Federal Bureau of Justice. Most of these women are mothers. And about one in twenty of them are pregnant.

Here in New York State, a woman who gives birth while serving time has the chance to stay with her baby in a prison nursery, for up to one year, or eighteen months if the mother is eligible for parole by then.

A Department of Corrections study found that participating in prison nurseries lowers recidivism rates dramatically--cutting the chances of a woman coming back to prison in half.

Researchers say these programs also help the babies, giving them a chance to form secure attachments to their moms.

But in recent years, the numbers of mothers in the prison nurseries have gone down. In our latest installment of the Prison Time Media Project, reporter Natasha Haverty set out to learn why.  Go to full article
Gov. Andrew Cuomo announces the formation of the "Commission to Investigate Public Corruption" under the Moreland Act and Executive Law Section 63(8) to probe systemic public corruption and the appearance of such corruption in state government, political campaigns and elections in New York State. Photo:  Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office via Flickr
Gov. Andrew Cuomo announces the formation of the "Commission to Investigate Public Corruption" under the Moreland Act and Executive Law Section 63(8) to probe systemic public corruption and the appearance of such corruption in state government, political campaigns and elections in New York State. Photo: Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office via Flickr

Past Albany corruption probe had mixed results

The past legislative session was scarred by a series of corruption scandals. One senator was taken away in handcuffs. An assemblyman resigned after sexual harassment charges and lawsuit. Nearly three dozen lawmakers were arrested, jailed or indicted.

Last week, Gov. Andrew Cuomo appointed what's known as a Moreland Commission to "root out" the wrongdoing in the legislature.

This Moreland Act Commission is not the first time a Governor has named a panel to probe state lawmakers. Andrew Cuomo's own father did so a quarter century ago, with mixed results.  Go to full article

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