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News stories tagged with "crime"

Franklin County legislator Billy Jones calls for action to stop the closure of Chateaugay Correctional Facility in his home town. Photo: Brian Mann
Franklin County legislator Billy Jones calls for action to stop the closure of Chateaugay Correctional Facility in his home town. Photo: Brian Mann

Another North Country town rallies to save its prison

This year, we're looking in-depth at the North Country's prison industry, how it grew into one of the region's top employers and how it's changing.

Over the weekend, hundreds of corrections officers, families, and elected officials gathered in Chateaugay in northern Franklin County.

They came to protest the latest round of state prison closures, now slated for 2014.

Four correctional facilities are on the chopping block, including two here in the North Country -- Mt. McGregor in Saratoga County and Chateaugay Correctional Facility.  Go to full article
Gov. Andrew Cuomo announces the formation of the "Commission to Investigate Public Corruption" under the Moreland Act and Executive Law Section 63(8) to probe systemic public corruption and the appearance of such corruption in state government, political campaigns and elections in New York State. Photo:  Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office via Flickr
Gov. Andrew Cuomo announces the formation of the "Commission to Investigate Public Corruption" under the Moreland Act and Executive Law Section 63(8) to probe systemic public corruption and the appearance of such corruption in state government, political campaigns and elections in New York State. Photo: Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office via Flickr

Corruption panel will hear from reformers

The second hearing by Gov. Andrew Cuomo's Moreland Act Commission on corruption in the legislature will be held Tuesday evening in Albany. Government reform groups are scheduled to testify, and some say the commission should also be looking at some of the campaign contributions to the governor himself.  Go to full article
Mary Rain (right) announces her candidacy at the St. Lawrence County courthouse in Canton. Joining her is Tandy Cyrus, whose son, Garrett Phillips, was murdered in 2011. The crime is still unsolved. Photo: David Sommerstein.
Mary Rain (right) announces her candidacy at the St. Lawrence County courthouse in Canton. Joining her is Tandy Cyrus, whose son, Garrett Phillips, was murdered in 2011. The crime is still unsolved. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Republican DA hopeful launches sharp attacks early

The race for St. Lawrence County District Attorney is on. And yesterday the challenger came out swinging. Republican Mary Rain attacked two-term incumbent Nicole Duv for failing to bring criminals to trial. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Gov. Andrew Cuomo announces the formation of the "Commission to Investigate Public Corruption" under the Moreland Act and Executive Law Section 63(8) to probe systemic public corruption and the appearance of such corruption in state government, political campaigns and elections in New York State. Photo:  Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office via Flickr
Gov. Andrew Cuomo announces the formation of the "Commission to Investigate Public Corruption" under the Moreland Act and Executive Law Section 63(8) to probe systemic public corruption and the appearance of such corruption in state government, political campaigns and elections in New York State. Photo: Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office via Flickr

Are pensions a backdoor way to fight corruption?

The commission appointed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo to investigate public corruption is holding its first series of hearings.

At the kick-off event in New York City, a federal prosecutor prominent in busting corruption in the legislature says he's found a back door way to confiscating the pensions of convicted state politicians.  Go to full article
Sheriff Kevin Mulverhill has come under fire from county legislators in Franklin County following the arrest of one of their members last month. Photo: NYS
Sheriff Kevin Mulverhill has come under fire from county legislators in Franklin County following the arrest of one of their members last month. Photo: NYS

Legislator arrest sparks political fight in Franklin County

County legislators in Malone are raising questions about the arrest of one of their own members last month for allegedly driving with his ability impaired by alcohol.

Tim Smith from Fort Covington pleaded not guilty to the charge. But now some of his fellow elected officials are questioning why the arrest was made.

This latest fight is part of an on-going feud between county legislators and Franklin County Sheriff Kevin Mulverhill.  Go to full article

Gun control fight shapes bitter Saratoga sheriff primary

Today's is primary day across New York state. There are big races in New York City and western New York.

One of the biggest contests in our region is the Republican battle for the sheriff post in Saratoga County.

Mike Zurlo, a former sheriff's lieutentnat, had been seen as the Republican frontrunner in that contest. He's been endorsed by the county GOP and by retiring sheriff James Bowen.

But he's faced a stiff challenge from Jeff Gildersleeve, a former state police
investigator who currently works for the Warren County sheriff's department.

Gildersleeve gained momentum after promising not to enforce New York's tough new gun control laws.

Brian Mann reports that the bitter Saratoga primary has emerged part of a wider debate over sheriffs and their response to the SAFE Act.  Go to full article
Gun rights activist Richard Mack (L) and Clinton County Sheriff David Favro (R) at a press conference earlier this summer in Plattsburgh, opposing the New York SAFE Act. Photo: Brian Mann
Gun rights activist Richard Mack (L) and Clinton County Sheriff David Favro (R) at a press conference earlier this summer in Plattsburgh, opposing the New York SAFE Act. Photo: Brian Mann

Cuomo: sheriffs can't pick and choose among laws

Gov. Andrew Cuomo says law enforcement officials don't get to pick and choose which laws to enforce.

Speaking yesterday in Ausable Forks, Cuomo said that includes county sheriffs who've publicly opposed the state's new gun control measure.  Go to full article
Israel Keyes (top right) being interrogated by FBI investigators a few days before he committed suicide in 2012.  (Photo:  Screen capture of FBI video)
Israel Keyes (top right) being interrogated by FBI investigators a few days before he committed suicide in 2012. (Photo: Screen capture of FBI video)

Israel Keyes video shows cunning, remorseless killer

This month, the FBI made public more information about the serial killer Israel Keyes, whose murder spree included time in the North Country and Vermont. Authorities believe that Keyes' murder spree continued for more than a decade and left as many as 11 people dead before he was captured in March of 2012.

Keyes committed suicide in a jail cell in Alaska last December, leaving unanswered questions about most of his victims.

For the first time, the FBI has released hours of video tape from their interviews with Keyes. The video offers a terrifying portrait of a killer who felt no remorse, who at times seemed to be taunting investigators.  Go to full article
The  Rev. Oberia Dempsey campaigned early against drugs in Harlem. Photo: Wikipedia
The Rev. Oberia Dempsey campaigned early against drugs in Harlem. Photo: Wikipedia

Why did black leaders support America's drug war for so long?

This year, North Country Public Radio is looking in-depth at America's forty year long drug war. Tough-on-crime policies, sparked in part by New York's Rockefeller drug laws, changed the way we think about crime and justice and addiction. They also changed the North Country, as more and more prisons were built to house the swelling number of inmates.

This morning, our series continues with a look at how the drug war has been viewed within the African American community. Some black leaders see tough crime laws as racially biased and unfair. But many supporters of the drug war hoped that long prison sentences and harsh penalties would help clean up neighborhoods plagued by drugs.  Go to full article
Charles Rangel (L) at the signing of a drug-war era law with Nancy Reagan and President Ronald Reagan. Photo:  Wikipedia
Charles Rangel (L) at the signing of a drug-war era law with Nancy Reagan and President Ronald Reagan. Photo: Wikipedia

Charles Rangel: America's "front-line general" in the drug war

America's black leadership supported the drug war for decades in large part because of the efforts of one man.

Charles Rangel, a former federal prosecutor and Korean War veteran, emerged as one of the dominant figures in the nation's politics.

He was also a fierce supporter of tough crime policies and was once described as the "front-line general in the war on drugs" by Ebony magazine.

Our profile of Charles Rangel is the latest installment in our Prison Time Media Project series.  Go to full article

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